Astronomers just measured a whole lot more than gravitational waves

A couple of weeks ago, the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) and Virgo teams announced the detection of another set of gravitational waves -- the fourth since LIGO's first detection in September of 2015. The observations of t...

Long-delayed Thirty Meter Telescope gets the go-ahead, for now

Building the world's largest telescope has proven to be even more difficult than one might expect. The Thirty Meter Telescope, which has been planned for construction atop of Hawaii's Mauna Kea, has hit a number of snags, but it got a major approval...

Nine of Cassini’s most exciting discoveries about Saturn

Saturn is something of a solar system unto itself (minus the requisite sun). It's surrounded by 53 confirmed moons and another 9 "moonlets," tiny worlds that are among the most exotic and diverse we've seen in this neck of the galaxy. For as much as...

How Star Trails Look from the ISS

If you’re in a dark enough place, and are patient enough to shoot lots of long exposure photos, you can capture some impressive star trail photography right here on Earth. The result are images which basically show the movement of the Earth relative to the stars around us.

During expeditions 30 and 31 on the International Space Station a few years back, astronauts captured a bunch of long exposure images of the stars around them, which were later used to create some beautiful star trail imagery.

In the video below, you can see the star trails as they were captured from the viewpoint of the ISS. It appears that the video’s editor layered multiple long-exposure images into a sort of time-lapse to build up the trails step by step:

It’s a fascinating way to look at space, and the result is some stunning, gallery-worthy imagery. If you want to shoot your own star trails without being launched into orbit, there’s an easy to follow tutorial over on PetaPixel.

Scientists may have found a Neptune-sized alien moon

Astronomers have found an abundance of exoplanets, but no exomoons. Despite ongoing efforts, the tiny celestial bodies have just been too elusive to detect using modern technology. However, researchers might have just hit paydirt. They've used Kepler...

Citizen scientists find a failed star in the Sun’s neighborhood

Citizen scientists may not have the time and equipment of their pro counterparts, but their dedication can sometimes lead to discoveries that would otherwise be impractical. Case in point: a NASA-backed citizen science initiative, Backyard Worlds: P...

Researchers discover one of the brightest galaxies ever seen

Scientists at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, a research institute in the Canary Islands, just discovered one of the brightest galaxies we've ever come across. It's around a thousand times brighter than our galaxy, has a very high rate of s...