Turn your wired Bose headphones into a truly wireless headset!

There’s a higher likelihood of your headphone having a 3.5mm jack than your phone having a 3.5mm input… but don’t ditch your headphones for wireless ones yet! It’s exactly what these large corporations want! To have you adopt standards that help them further their vision. Your wired set of headphones are more than capable of being your primary headphones, the only hurdle is turning them wireless. The AirMod by Bolle & Raven helps that happen. Designed here for the Bose QuietComfort QC25 headphones, the AirMod just conveniently plugs into your headphone where the aux cable wood, and turns them, with a simple touch of a button, into wireless-enabled headphones. The AirMod is quite literally a Bluetooth receiver, catching audio from your phone or playback device and playing it through on your headphones.

Designed to fit snugly around the profile of the earpiece, the AirMod sits on your headphone pretty innocuously, without gathering much attention. It delivers up to 7 hours of constant playback on a single charge, and features a built-in mic and controls to make switching from phone calls to music a breeze. The AirMod currently comes in three variants, for the Bose QC15, QC25, and the Beats Solo 2, and are designed to exactly fit the profile of these headphones, but maybe Bolle & Raven will release more variants with time! After all, isn’t it better spending a quick buck to make your great headphones wireless than to burn a hole in your pocket trying to buy a good wireless headset??

Designer: Bolle & Raven

Click Here to Buy Now

Click Here to Buy Now

What we’re listening to in March: Star Wars and ‘Keeping the Rave Alive’

We've been listening to a lot over the past month, but two items stand out. Managing Editor James Trew discusses DJ Kutski's podcast, and Social Media Producer Michael Morris discovers an expanded audio version of the classic Star Wars films.

Wearing headphones at a concert isn’t as weird as I thought it would be

One of the worst concerts I've ever attended in my life -- in terms of pure sound quality -- was at Barclays Center. I get that arena shows are never going to be known for their top-notch acoustics, but the concrete cavern that the Brooklyn Nets call...

Samsung Galaxy Buds review: A waste of good design

Apple has the AirPods for the iPhone, and now Samsung has a true wireless headphone made specifically for its Galaxy lineup. The Galaxy Buds offer a lot of the same features as most other true wireless earbuds: charging case, on-board controls, audio...

Speakers that let you design your own surround sound

The Museg is a pretty neat looking guitar-pick-shaped speaker. Unlike most speakers that are either squarish, cylindrical, or circular, the Museg’s use of a triangular form feels slightly unusual, but makes it deservingly eye-catching.

However, it isn’t Museg’s shape that’s worth lauding, it’s its ability to use its shape along with modularity to be portable when you want it, and an immersive music setup when you need. When used individually, the Museg is a slim speaker that’s great to use solo. It throws audio in a 120° wide cone, making it ideal for carrying around with you. However, snap two speakers together and you’ve got a synced audio unit that fits well in corners, throwing sound in a conveniently wide 240° cone. The Museg, in its dual-setup works great when placed against a wall, like on a cabinet/mantelpiece. If you want the Museg to be placed in the center of a room, pair three of them together to get an immersive 360° experience. The Museg’s ability to be used in a single, dual, and triple setup means it can be used as a personal audio device, or a space-specific audio device too. The units conveniently pair when near each other, and the logo on the upper part of the speaker grille even has a pretty intuitive way of letting you know when two or more speakers have synced together. Pretty nifty, no?

Designer: Jake Naish

The Eames Radio is making a modern comeback after over 70 years

After a little over 70 years, Vitra is doing a special reissue of Ray and Charles Eames’ iconic radio design, but bringing it back with a slight modern twist. The Eames Radio, if you look at it, looks quite like the icon of a radio. It’s perhaps the most natural design ever, featuring a use of geometry, proportion, and just pure sense, to make something so clear and so beautiful, it looks stunning even after 70 years. Vitra’s reissue takes that design and puts a modern spin on it. The radio still comes with a molded plywood exterior, an antenna, and a matrix of circular holes that serve as the speaker grille. It still comes with two rotary knobs, but also packs four extra control buttons and an LCD display that’s equally vintage and modern. With the Eames signature on the bottom left, the Vitra Eames Radio pays tribute to an icon of product design, created by two of product design’s most revered names. In honor of how special the original design is, Vitra is limiting their production/reissue to just 999 pieces.

Designer: Vitra X Ray & Charles Eames