Ten of the most unconventional award-winning Architecture Designs from A’ Design Award 2019

In keeping with Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s description of architecture as frozen music, this post is quite literally a playlist of the best architectural designs from 2019.

One of the A’ Design Awards’ most strong categories, Architecture sees a lot of entrants as well as winners from around the globe. We handpicked some of the most beautiful, most intriguing, most inspirational, and definitely the most unique architectural pieces from the A’ Design Award and Competition’s winners list of 2019. Ranging from conceptual designs to residential units, to religious spaces, offices, museums, and retail spaces, the A’ Design Award covers architecture in its entirety, aside from a wide roster of other design categories. Not only does winning an A’ Design Award look great on an architect’s resume, it also brings a lot of repute and focus to the work, uplifting the value of both the designer and the design!

The A’ Design Award is currently accepting entries for the 2020 edition of the award program, so go ahead and give your work and career the push it deserves!

If you’re an architect looking to participate in the A’ Design Awards 2020, click here to register. Hurry! The regular deadline ends on 30th September!

01. Arbor Arena Parametric Pavilion by Selvagen
Taking inspiration from low-poly structures, the Arbor Arena Pavilion is a neat exploration in parametric architecture that uses a series of triangles to create a geodesic dome shape, complete with windows and even a star-shaped skylight on the top. Designed for a temporary event in 2018, the modular structure is now being rebuilt as a permanent addition to the Botanical Garden in Recife, Brazil.

02. Cohen Chapel by Joaquim Portela
Featured on Yanko Design back in 2016 as the Aurelios Chapel, Joaquim Portela’s chapel design explores something absolutely unique in terms of architecture, leave alone religion-inspired architecture. A chimney-esque detail acts as an abstract steeple on the outside, but in fact works as a skylight, diverting a strong shaft of light into the chapel to beautifully illuminate the altar.

03. Cecilip Facade by Dante Luna G.
Designed as a facade for a plastic surgery clinic, the organic shape of this facade takes inspiration from the undulating curves of human skin. Its reflective nature is designed to be instantly recognizable but also attractive, in a way being a metaphor for what the clinic hopes to achieve for the patients that visit. The facade was made locally and is composed of more than three thousand profiles of stainless steel with mirror finish, each with two pieces cut CNC and armed with 3M structural tape, similar to those used in aviation, on a metal support structure.

04. Volcano Eyes Observation Platform by Jaskó+Vági Építész Kft.
Created using a basic metal framework, and filled with the rocks found in and around the area, this elevated observation platform was made in May 2018 for the Nemrut Volcano Eyes Competition, to help view a 360 degree panoramic view to the Nemrut Volcano’s caldera or crater. An upper part of the structure acts as a platform for viewing the volcano, while the lower half transforms as a shelter for the people who decide to camp or spend the night at the location.

05. Liberty Stadium by Aysan Moosvai and Farzad Saeidi
Designed to be equal parts alluring (from both the top as well as bottom, and from inside and out) as well as lightweight, the Liberty Stadium uses a combination of support structures and tensegrity to create its design. Designed around the popularity and pull of football, the structure relies on being able to create spaces for crowds to navigate easily, preventing bottlenecks and enabling circulation of the public. The project started in October 2018 and finished in January 2019 in Tehran.

06. Old Palapye Museum by Beullah Serema
For the record, this is what I imagine buildings in modern Martian societies will look like. A combination of beautiful indigenous materials like the red rock along with futuristic styles and facades made of glass. The outstanding burnt brick church ruins stand proudly within perimeters of a rich historic site of the 19th century capital of the Bangwato tribe. Built in 1891 by the London Missionary Society, it was later abandoned after the royal King Khama III relocated his capital to another resource-rich site. Designed as a museum to showcase and preserve the past cultures and artifacts, the architect designed a museum and exhibition space by working with the existing ruins, so as to not override them but rather create a new life around them!

07. Wuxi Wanda Mall by WANDACTI and CCI Architecture Design & Consulting Co.,Ltd.
Unusual for combining a rectangular footprint with its flower-esque inspiration, the Wuxi Wanda Mall has a rather unique aesthetic. The design inspiration of the project is derived from the Wuxi city flower “azalea”, and is designed to cover five different theme parks with five azalea petals respectively. The project is located in the main axis of Wuxi cultural tourism city, accommodating for shopping, catering, culture, entertainment and leisure.

08. Casa Ojala House by Beatrice Bonzanigo
The term used to describe Casa Ojala is that it’s a ‘highly flexible house’, which immediately makes it quite an interesting concept in the first place. A sustainable, minimal, compact and flexible product for a new comfort, away from TV or air conditioning, the Casa Ojala blurs the lines between what’s indoors and what’s outdoors. The flexible house has two bedrooms, one with a double bed and one with a single bed, a bathroom, a terrace, a kitchenette and a living room, which can, in fact, be continuously transformed into one another or become a large outdoor platform, a house with no roof or even no floor. “The home becomes a surprise, a game, a theatre, fragrances and gestures. The landscape is its facade”, says Beatrice Bonzanigo. The project was patented in December 2017 in Milan, and was exhibited in Salone del Mobile in April 2019 in Milan.

09. M50 Art Hotel by Yun LU – MUDA-Architects
Built in the musical town of Pingle in Sichuan, the M50 hotel actually abstracts a musical piece and turns it into architecture, pretty much canonizing Goethe’s quote of architecture being like frozen music. The external curved facade mimics the rhythmic movement of music and the bodily sway associated with it while the external curtain wall employs a horizontally subdivided aluminum plate, which closely resembles the texture of bamboo, as a hat tip to Sichuan’s bamboo culture.

10. Sailing Castle Pavilion by Cheng Tsung Feng
Bringing the ship’s sails to land as a strong expression-piece, the Sailing Castle Pavilion is a quaint open space that reacts with its surroundings by billowing with the wind, while remaining static on land. Tapping into the feeling of seeing a fleet of boats and fishermen sailing out to see, or making their journey back to land, the pavilion hopes to create that feeling of awe, at looking at a vast number of sails billowing in the wind together. The interaction among people and the Sailing Castle is a representation of the prosperity of the fishery industry, communal unity, expectation, and joy.

Impressed? Inspired? Go ahead and grab a spot for your own designs at the A’ Design Award and Competition 2020! Click here to Register Now! Hurry! The regular deadline ends on 30th September!

Entries are now open for the A’ Design Awards and Competition 2020!

Promising yet again to cover the best in design across all disciplines, the A’ Design Award and Competition‘s 2020 edition is now open for entries. Every year, the awards honor and celebrate designs and designers spanning over a hundred categories, ranging from Furniture, Architecture, Industrial Design, Consumer Electronics, Medical Design, Service Design and many other design domains. Gathering a jury of over 200 senior designers and educators from around the world, A’ Design Award is perhaps one of the most recognized platforms for true validation.

The A’ Design Awards were founded to be a Yellow-Pages of sorts for good designs and designers. Applicants range from non-designers to students, professionals, teams, to even vast organizations. Judges take an agnostic approach to the entries, evaluating them for their concept, execution, aesthetics, philosophy, and potential for social change. Winners of the A’ Design Award are then entitled to not just a trophy and certificate, but also vast PR campaigns, extensive publication on design blogs, and the ability to get their designs to millions of more eyes across the globe. Even participants find themselves on the winning side, because just registering for the A’ Design Award entitles participants to a free evaluation of their design, as well as an inclusion in the Business Network, as well as access to A’ Design Award’s free Design Fee Calculator that allows designers to accurately price their products and services.

At the end of the day, the awards annually plot the best work from around the world, creating an extensive map of good design from across the globe. A’ Design Awards’ program even ranks individual designers on an international scale, as well as provides scores for each country, creating value by allowing you to capture progress and even study design trends as they happen. Be a part of the most diverse international design competition there is! Registrations for the A’ Design Awards and Competition 2020 are now open!

Click Here to Register for the A’ Design Award and Competition 2020! Deadline for registrations and submissions: 30th September 2019


A look at winners from A’ Design Award and Competition 2019

01. Flexpai Flexible Smartphone by Royole

Currently the first and only flexible smartphone to be shipped to the public (Samsung’s Fold was faulty, and Huawei had its own problems), the Flexpai is at the forefront of the bending-smartphone revolution! With an outward-bending screen that can be used in both folded and unfolded formats, the Flexpai innovates in a category that most company haven’t even properly set foot into!

02. Intermodality Desk by Attila Stromajer

Inspired by the prominent role and place of grand pianos in homes, the Intermodality desk is just as grand. With a design that follows the cues of the large instrument, the desk comes with a similar shape, size, and even features a large lid that opens sideways, like in a grand piano. Standing on three legs, like the musical instrument, the Intermodality desk is crafted from antiqued plywood, and features copper trimmings near the handles and at the base of the legs, adding a touch of finesse to the desk’s grand design.

03. Luminous Lighting + Sound System by Mohammad Hossein Namayandegi


A combination of light and sound, Luminous is a chandelier that also works as a speaker with 360° surround sound. The setup comprises a ring-shaped design with LEDs on the inside of the ring, casting an ambient glow across the room, while 20 audio drivers arranged around the outer part of the ring create a rich, immersive audio experience fitting for a grand ballroom or even a large living space.

04. Sidekick Notebook by Tan Mavitan

The Sidekick is quirky, but has logic to it. An A5 notebook looks small on your desk, but open it and it doubles in size, becoming an A4, and occupying precious real estate on your desk. The Sidekick has no such problem. Its unusual shape and diagonal spine allows it to open into an ‘L’ shaped notebook that can easily sit at the corner of your keyboard, or your mousepad, or even tablet. The notebook won’t serve well for sketching, but makes a good note-taking pad, offering both landscape and portrait writing areas. Take notes, make doodles, or probably even sketch on it if you can, the Sidekick is that one notebook you won’t buy and put away only because you’ll love keeping it on your table to occasionally take notes, and to perpetually show off.

05. Natede Air Purifier by Vincenzo Vitiello – Laboratori Fabrici

The Natede is a nifty planter/air-purifier hybrid that keeps the house green and the air clean! The core technology of Natede is phytoremediation, a NASA-developed technology that forces the air through the roots of the plant to amplify its natural purification power. Designed to work discreetly and with no need for external filters that need constant replacement, Natede conveniently purifies the air you breathe by getting the plant to absorb microorganisms, gases, and dust particles, while also adding a dash of fauna to your decor!

06. Tearista Automatic Tea Maker by Shilton Chong

The Tearista is a one-of-a-kind device that democratizes instant-tea-making the way the coffee-maker allowed households to automatically brew coffee every day. At the center of the Tearista (combination of Tea and Barista) is its kettle-and-brewer combo. The kettle or carafe holds the water in it, while a perforated brewer compartment holds the tea-leaves. A control panel at the base allows you to program the steep-time and water temperature, based on the leaves you’ve selected, and the machine does the rest. A mechanical arm descends the brewer into the kettle, immediately kickstarting the tea-brewing process. When the timer comes to an end, the brewer compartment ascends upwards, ending the brewing process and leaving you with a perfectly prepared vessel full of tea!

07. Quiett Induction Cooktop by Seokhyun Park and Dosun Shin

Quiett isn’t like most induction cooktops. While induction cooking is still relatively in its prime, Quiett takes it a step further, showcasing the future of culinary preparation. The Quiett uses wonderfully sleek induction modules that snap to one and other, conveying information to each other while also giving you the ability to lay your hob out in a format that fits your countertop. The cooking surfaces are slightly recessed, making sure your vessels don’t slip off the glossy glass surface easily, and Quiett’s most futuristic feature remains its screen, built into an area right beside one of the induction plates. The screen displays recipes, allowing you to cook and follow instructions at the same time, seamlessly taking you through the cooking process, and allowing you to create new dishes without breaking a sweat! I imagine the display could play videos too, helping cooks master new techniques and skills in the kitchen and create remarkably tasty food!

08. Supporting Umbrella by Li Purui

With a shape that looks like a splash of water and a yellow color that almost gives it the appearance of a mini-crown, the Supporting Umbrella solves two rather annoying problems with the umbrella experience. A. Stability, and B. Water dripping on the floor.
The Supporting Umbrella retrofits onto most umbrella designs with the spoke at the end. It gives your umbrella a cute crown when open in the rain, and when you’re done, lets you stand the umbrella vertically on its tip. When placed vertically upside down, the Supporting Umbrella attachment uses a small concavity to collect all the water that drips off your umbrella, so that you’re not left with a pool of water on the floor every time you try to dry your umbrella out.

09. Shiny Movie Ticket by Li Peitong

The Shiny Movie Ticket is the perfect example of a simple idea that’s so revolutionary that it just absolutely warrants recognition. Designed to eliminate the need for people to constantly shine a light on their ticket stub to see which seat they’re supposed to sit in, the Shiny Movie Ticket comes with perforated numbers that tell you your row as well as seat number. It’s so remarkably simple I can’t believe no one’s ever done something like this. While movie halls need to remain dark for the projection to look bright and vivid, the Shiny Movie Ticket allows you to easily see your row and seat number by simply holding the perforated ticket to the illuminated cinema screen. Sheer simplicity, absolute genius.

10. Shell Sofa by Natalia Komarova

With a voluminous yet hollow frame, the Shell sofa is instantly visible. It is, in a strictly physical sense, minimalist (because it’s mainly hollow), but visually, the Shell sofa is almost pillowy, spacious, and a treat to look at. The sofa is a frame that curves from the left to the back and to the right, with space in between for cushions, or even two side tables if you remove the cushions at the extreme ends. It’s visually imposing, but still manages to look light and airy, thanks to its wickerwork of metal rods. The interwoven rods also create this moire effect that creates a dynamic optical illusion, making the Shell sofa’s body incredibly interesting to look at… and while we’re on the subject of interesting, the sofa comes with two small openings at the beginning and end of its structure, making it perhaps the most entertaining play area for a domestic cat. Good luck getting it out though once it goes inside!

Click Here to Register for the A’ Design Award and Competition 2020! Deadline for registrations and submissions: 30th September 2019

‘Game of Thrones’ and Amazon’s ‘Mrs. Maisel’ lead Emmy nominations

The Television Academy has revealed this year's Emmy nominations and to absolutely no one's surprise, Game of Thrones scooped up the most nods with 32, including Outstanding Drama Series and 10 nominees across various acting categories. The show with...

There are only 2 days left to enter TISDC. Winners receive up to $13,000 cash.

If the past few years have been any indication, the east is strongly embracing design culture and the power of design when it comes to shaping lives, societies, and cultures. Countries like China, Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan are looking to adopt design thinking and design-led innovation on a massive, government-backed scale. The TISDC, or the Taiwan International Student Design Competition, integrates their Ministry of Education’s art and design talent fostering programs, creating the very reverse of a brain drain, and bringing great design thinking to their societies and their cultural landscape.

Held every year since 2010, the TISDC is a great way to use design to create a visible impact, especially since the competition is organized closely with the patronage and support of the Taiwan’s Ministry of Education. With past themes ranging from “Embrace”, and “Circles of Life” to last year’s theme of “Breakthrough & Innovation” and this year’s theme of “Empathy”, the competition encourages participation on an international scale, while also creating a crucial information exchange between Taiwan and the rest of the design world. The current year’s theme of “Empathy” aims to get designers to take on a more user-centric approach and address problems by putting themselves in the user’s specific scenario, by “Seeing the problem through their eyes”.

The Taiwan International Student Design Competition is held across various categories, spanning Product Design, Visual Communication, and Digital Animation, and is judged by a jury panel for their creativity, interpretation of the theme, expression of concept, and aesthetic approach. Winners are awarded a trophy + certificate along with a hefty cash prize of up to $13,000. Organized specifically to foster and nurture student talent, the awards program is made for students, prospective students, and immediate graduates, and requires no registration fee.

Recap:

– No Registration Fee
– Grand Prix (1 winner): $13,000
– Gold Prize (1 winner for each category): $8,000
– Silver Prize (1 winner for each category): $5,000
– Bronze Prize (3 winners for each category): $2,000
– Last Date for Submission: June 30 at 24:00 Taipei Time

Click Here to Submit Your Designs Now. Closes on June 30th.

Below: Winning Designs from TISDC 2018

Easy-Pull Barrier by Jhe-Wei Lin, Jui-Feng Tang

Much like how a QueueMaster makes it really easy to organize crowds and manage queues at airports, movie halls, concerts, and museums, the Easy-Pull Barrier quite easily creates specialized paths on roadways for cars to follow. Relying on the existing barricade design, the Easy-Pull Barrier just puts a convenient collapsible gate within it, giving it extra purpose. Use the barrier as is, or extend the metal gate within to give you more control, the Easy-Pull Barrier is a much more effective way of cordoning off, or outlining roadways during construction, or emergencies. A single barricade can now block off an entire road, when in the past one would need multiple barricades to block out a road. Plus, given their linked-metal construction, these collapsible gates can bend too, giving you full control over how you want to lay the barriers out!

Smart Gloves by Xue Hou, Ying Zhao, Qiu-Shi Zheng, Yue Wang

The Smart Gloves aren’t your ordinary prosthetic. Using an induction-chip/sensor the Smart Gloves can perceive the skin and skeleton changes of nearby fingers to analyze the movement path of the missing finger. The glove’s chip picks up on tiny actions on the backside of your palm to intelligently predict how your prosthetic should behave, giving them the dexterity and nuance you’d get from any normal fingers.

Breathing Barrier by Tsung-Ying Hsieh, Hsuan-Ting Huang

Designed to play multiple roles in making cities better for residents within cities, the Breathing Barrier does the job of an aesthetic, audio, and pollution barrier, making city-life much more liveable. The moss barrier is pleasing to look at, and adds a touch of greenery to our lives, while the barrier itself helps block out noise pollution caused by vehicles on the roads. The barrier comes with multiple layers on the inside which trap dust, dirt, and particulate matter, which the moss uses as nutrients, feeding off the pollution and emission caused by automobiles. The Breathable Barrier is a clever way to turn cities green without changing the transportation setup to an emission-free electric one. The emissions from cars end up nourishing the barriers, causing them to flourish, and in turn, naturally purify our air. It’s a win for everyone!

Safety Protection by Zhi Li, Jia-Yuan Zhao, Yun-Qing Wang, Si Liu

With a collapsible shield that unfolds when in use, the Safety Protection fire extinguisher not only fights fire, it protects the firefighter too. The collapsible shield comes with a window that the firefighter can look through, and guards the fighter from any flames that may approach them. The shield even acts as a thermal barrier, keeping the waves of heat from reaching the firefighter, effectively allowing them to fight fire without experiencing the burning effects of the proximity to high heat.

Easy Take by Zhou-Quan Song, Xing-Ting Liang

A simple solution for a simple problem, Easy Take introduces a strip of fabric/plastic to packaged tins, making them easier to pull out, rather than having to dig around to get your fingers in and pull a can out from a full row. A simple string, made from recycled plastic, zigzags its way around the cans, and pulling on the string can disrupt the cans’ order, allowing you to easily grab a single can out of a tightly packed box. Worthy of an honorable mention, I’d say.

Protective Stretcher by Qiu-Shi Zheng, Yun-Qing Wang, Jin He, Shi-Chun Yu

The Protective Stretcher combines the benefits of a stretcher with that of a makeshift cast, by cushioning your body in place using airbags. The bags hold the injured patient in the supine position as the medics carry them out, avoiding any secondary injuries or paralysis that could occur during an emergency evacuation or transit. The airbags are laid out according to ergonomic and medical specifications, gently cushioning bones and joints to keep them in shape, while also keeping the head slightly elevated to prevent blood from rushing to the head.

Wathield Bucket by Ming-Sheng Shih

Ever tried to fill a big bucket in a tiny sink? If so, you know that it’s impossible to use the bucket’s full capacity because of the tilt. Even worse, if the sink is too small, you might not be able to fill it at all. Designed with these issues in mind, the WATHIELD bucket aims to make this everyday task much easier.
Shaped like a traditional bucket, it sports an additional feature in the form of an extended lip that funnels water into the bucket with ease. Better yet, it can be tucked away when it’s not being used. Simply unfold the lip and run it under the sink to capture water even if the space is compact.

Nipple Dust Mask by Jin-Ho Chae, Na-Yeun Kim

The Nipple Dust Mask is an unusual product that may just become a necessity in a few years, with rising environmental concerns about unchecked emissions. Designed to pacify as well as protect the baby’s young respiratory system, the Nipple Dust Mask keeps a child pacified, via a BPA-free polymer nipple, but also surrounds the nose and mouth with a HEPA filter that traps particulate matter, ensuring the child is breathing contaminant-free air.

Click Here to Submit Your Designs Now. Closes on June 30th.

The copyright of all works and pictures are owned by the winners of 2018 Taiwan International Student Design Competition.

There are only 10 days left to enter “Design For Empathy” Competition

If the past few years have been any indication, the east is strongly embracing design culture and the power of design when it comes to shaping lives, societies, and cultures. Countries like China, Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan are looking to adopt design thinking and design-led innovation on a massive, government-backed scale. The TISDC, or the Taiwan International Student Design Competition, integrates their Ministry of Education’s art and design talent fostering programs, creating the very reverse of a brain drain, and bringing great design thinking to their societies and their cultural landscape.

Held every year since 2010, the TISDC is a great way to use design to create a visible impact, especially since the competition is organized closely with the patronage and support of the Taiwan’s Ministry of Education. With past themes ranging from “Embrace”, and “Circles of Life” to last year’s theme of “Breakthrough & Innovation” and this year’s theme of “Empathy”, the competition encourages participation on an international scale, while also creating a crucial information exchange between Taiwan and the rest of the design world. The current year’s theme of “Empathy” aims to get designers to take on a more user-centric approach and address problems by putting themselves in the user’s specific scenario, by “Seeing the problem through their eyes”.

The Taiwan International Student Design Competition is held across various categories, spanning Product Design, Visual Communication, and Digital Animation, and is judged by a jury panel for their creativity, interpretation of the theme, expression of concept, and aesthetic approach. Winners are awarded a trophy + certificate along with a hefty cash prize of up to $13,000. Organized specifically to foster and nurture student talent, the awards program is made for students, prospective students, and immediate graduates, and requires no registration fee.

Recap:

– No Registration Fee
– Grand Prix (1 winner): $13,000
– Gold Prize (1 winner for each category): $8,000
– Silver Prize (1 winner for each category): $5,000
– Bronze Prize (3 winners for each category): $2,000
– Last Date for Submission: June 30 at 24:00 Taipei Time

Click Here to Submit Your Designs Now. Closes on June 30th.

Below: Winning Designs from TISDC 2018

Easy-Pull Barrier by Jhe-Wei Lin, Jui-Feng Tang

Much like how a QueueMaster makes it really easy to organize crowds and manage queues at airports, movie halls, concerts, and museums, the Easy-Pull Barrier quite easily creates specialized paths on roadways for cars to follow. Relying on the existing barricade design, the Easy-Pull Barrier just puts a convenient collapsible gate within it, giving it extra purpose. Use the barrier as is, or extend the metal gate within to give you more control, the Easy-Pull Barrier is a much more effective way of cordoning off, or outlining roadways during construction, or emergencies. A single barricade can now block off an entire road, when in the past one would need multiple barricades to block out a road. Plus, given their linked-metal construction, these collapsible gates can bend too, giving you full control over how you want to lay the barriers out!

Smart Gloves by Xue Hou, Ying Zhao, Qiu-Shi Zheng, Yue Wang

The Smart Gloves aren’t your ordinary prosthetic. Using an induction-chip/sensor the Smart Gloves can perceive the skin and skeleton changes of nearby fingers to analyze the movement path of the missing finger. The glove’s chip picks up on tiny actions on the backside of your palm to intelligently predict how your prosthetic should behave, giving them the dexterity and nuance you’d get from any normal fingers.

Breathing Barrier by Tsung-Ying Hsieh, Hsuan-Ting Huang

Designed to play multiple roles in making cities better for residents within cities, the Breathing Barrier does the job of an aesthetic, audio, and pollution barrier, making city-life much more liveable. The moss barrier is pleasing to look at, and adds a touch of greenery to our lives, while the barrier itself helps block out noise pollution caused by vehicles on the roads. The barrier comes with multiple layers on the inside which trap dust, dirt, and particulate matter, which the moss uses as nutrients, feeding off the pollution and emission caused by automobiles. The Breathable Barrier is a clever way to turn cities green without changing the transportation setup to an emission-free electric one. The emissions from cars end up nourishing the barriers, causing them to flourish, and in turn, naturally purify our air. It’s a win for everyone!

Safety Protection by Zhi Li, Jia-Yuan Zhao, Yun-Qing Wang, Si Liu

With a collapsible shield that unfolds when in use, the Safety Protection fire extinguisher not only fights fire, it protects the firefighter too. The collapsible shield comes with a window that the firefighter can look through, and guards the fighter from any flames that may approach them. The shield even acts as a thermal barrier, keeping the waves of heat from reaching the firefighter, effectively allowing them to fight fire without experiencing the burning effects of the proximity to high heat.

Easy Take by Zhou-Quan Song, Xing-Ting Liang

A simple solution for a simple problem, Easy Take introduces a strip of fabric/plastic to packaged tins, making them easier to pull out, rather than having to dig around to get your fingers in and pull a can out from a full row. A simple string, made from recycled plastic, zigzags its way around the cans, and pulling on the string can disrupt the cans’ order, allowing you to easily grab a single can out of a tightly packed box. Worthy of an honorable mention, I’d say.

Protective Stretcher by Qiu-Shi Zheng, Yun-Qing Wang, Jin He, Shi-Chun Yu

The Protective Stretcher combines the benefits of a stretcher with that of a makeshift cast, by cushioning your body in place using airbags. The bags hold the injured patient in the supine position as the medics carry them out, avoiding any secondary injuries or paralysis that could occur during an emergency evacuation or transit. The airbags are laid out according to ergonomic and medical specifications, gently cushioning bones and joints to keep them in shape, while also keeping the head slightly elevated to prevent blood from rushing to the head.

Wathield Bucket by Ming-Sheng Shih

Ever tried to fill a big bucket in a tiny sink? If so, you know that it’s impossible to use the bucket’s full capacity because of the tilt. Even worse, if the sink is too small, you might not be able to fill it at all. Designed with these issues in mind, the WATHIELD bucket aims to make this everyday task much easier.
Shaped like a traditional bucket, it sports an additional feature in the form of an extended lip that funnels water into the bucket with ease. Better yet, it can be tucked away when it’s not being used. Simply unfold the lip and run it under the sink to capture water even if the space is compact.

Nipple Dust Mask by Jin-Ho Chae, Na-Yeun Kim

The Nipple Dust Mask is an unusual product that may just become a necessity in a few years, with rising environmental concerns about unchecked emissions. Designed to pacify as well as protect the baby’s young respiratory system, the Nipple Dust Mask keeps a child pacified, via a BPA-free polymer nipple, but also surrounds the nose and mouth with a HEPA filter that traps particulate matter, ensuring the child is breathing contaminant-free air.

Click Here to Submit Your Designs Now. Closes on June 30th.

The copyright of all works and pictures are owned by the winners of 2018 Taiwan International Student Design Competition.

PocketMaker is literally a palm-sized, low-cost 3D printer!

Determined to make 3D printing accessible to all, the PocketMaker was created to be an incredibly competitive, low-cost, value-for-money printer to beat all other printers. Unlike most 3D printers that occupy a good 4-9 sq.ft. of space, the PocketMaker literally occupies the same amount of space as your palm and fingers, and comes with a detachable/replaceable printer head/extruder that you can easily swap when you find the nozzle getting blocked. The PocketMaker comes with plastic rails, not only bringing down the cost, but the weight too, and while plastic-to-plastic movement isn’t as smooth as a metal-on-metal gear/rail system, the PocketMaker’s small size makes up for it, giving you a tiny, low-cost printer that is capable of generating 8*8*8cm prints with no hassle. The PocketMaker works with PLA filament, allowing its baseplate to remain plain (unlike ABS printers that need a heated plate), truly working to create a proper, easy-to-use printer that’s low on space and cost, but high on possibilities!

The PocketMaker is a winner of the A’ Design Award for the year 2019.

Designers: Lang Qiyue and Yang Tian

“Design for Empathy” is the 2019 theme for the Taiwan International Student Design Competition

If the past few years have been any indication, the east is strongly embracing design culture and the power of design when it comes to shaping lives, societies, and cultures. Countries like China, Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan are looking to adopt design thinking and design-led innovation on a massive, government-backed scale. The TISDC, or the Taiwan International Student Design Competition, integrates their Ministry of Education’s art and design talent fostering programs, creating the very reverse of a brain drain, and bringing great design thinking to their societies and their cultural landscape.

Held every year since 2010, the TISDC is a great way to use design to create a visible impact, especially since the competition is organized closely with the patronage and support of the Taiwan’s Ministry of Education. With past themes ranging from “Embrace”, and “Circles of Life” to last year’s theme of “Breakthrough & Innovation” and this year’s theme of “Empathy”, the competition encourages participation on an international scale, while also creating a crucial information exchange between Taiwan and the rest of the design world. The current year’s theme of “Empathy” aims to get designers to take on a more user-centric approach and address problems by putting themselves in the user’s specific scenario, by “Seeing the problem through their eyes”.

The Taiwan International Student Design Competition is held across various categories, spanning Product Design, Visual Communication, and Digital Animation, and is judged by a jury panel for their creativity, interpretation of the theme, expression of concept, and aesthetic approach. Winners are awarded a trophy + certificate along with a hefty cash prize of up to $13,000. Organized specifically to foster and nurture student talent, the awards program is made for students, prospective students, and immediate graduates, and requires no registration fee.

Recap:

– No Registration Fee
– Grand Prix (1 winner): $13,000
– Gold Prize (1 winner for each category): $8,000
– Silver Prize (1 winner for each category): $5,000
– Bronze Prize (3 winners for each category): $2,000
– Last Date for Submission: June 30 at 24:00 Taipei Time

Click Here to Submit Your Designs Now. Closes on June 30th.

Below: Winning Designs from TISDC 2018

Easy-Pull Barrier by Jhe-Wei Lin, Jui-Feng Tang

Much like how a QueueMaster makes it really easy to organize crowds and manage queues at airports, movie halls, concerts, and museums, the Easy-Pull Barrier quite easily creates specialized paths on roadways for cars to follow. Relying on the existing barricade design, the Easy-Pull Barrier just puts a convenient collapsible gate within it, giving it extra purpose. Use the barrier as is, or extend the metal gate within to give you more control, the Easy-Pull Barrier is a much more effective way of cordoning off, or outlining roadways during construction, or emergencies. A single barricade can now block off an entire road, when in the past one would need multiple barricades to block out a road. Plus, given their linked-metal construction, these collapsible gates can bend too, giving you full control over how you want to lay the barriers out!

Smart Gloves by Xue Hou, Ying Zhao, Qiu-Shi Zheng, Yue Wang

The Smart Gloves aren’t your ordinary prosthetic. Using an induction-chip/sensor the Smart Gloves can perceive the skin and skeleton changes of nearby fingers to analyze the movement path of the missing finger. The glove’s chip picks up on tiny actions on the backside of your palm to intelligently predict how your prosthetic should behave, giving them the dexterity and nuance you’d get from any normal fingers.

Breathing Barrier by Tsung-Ying Hsieh, Hsuan-Ting Huang

Designed to play multiple roles in making cities better for residents within cities, the Breathing Barrier does the job of an aesthetic, audio, and pollution barrier, making city-life much more liveable. The moss barrier is pleasing to look at, and adds a touch of greenery to our lives, while the barrier itself helps block out noise pollution caused by vehicles on the roads. The barrier comes with multiple layers on the inside which trap dust, dirt, and particulate matter, which the moss uses as nutrients, feeding off the pollution and emission caused by automobiles. The Breathable Barrier is a clever way to turn cities green without changing the transportation setup to an emission-free electric one. The emissions from cars end up nourishing the barriers, causing them to flourish, and in turn, naturally purify our air. It’s a win for everyone!

Safety Protection by Zhi Li, Jia-Yuan Zhao, Yun-Qing Wang, Si Liu

With a collapsible shield that unfolds when in use, the Safety Protection fire extinguisher not only fights fire, it protects the firefighter too. The collapsible shield comes with a window that the firefighter can look through, and guards the fighter from any flames that may approach them. The shield even acts as a thermal barrier, keeping the waves of heat from reaching the firefighter, effectively allowing them to fight fire without experiencing the burning effects of the proximity to high heat.

Easy Take by Zhou-Quan Song, Xing-Ting Liang

A simple solution for a simple problem, Easy Take introduces a strip of fabric/plastic to packaged tins, making them easier to pull out, rather than having to dig around to get your fingers in and pull a can out from a full row. A simple string, made from recycled plastic, zigzags its way around the cans, and pulling on the string can disrupt the cans’ order, allowing you to easily grab a single can out of a tightly packed box. Worthy of an honorable mention, I’d say.

Protective Stretcher by Qiu-Shi Zheng, Yun-Qing Wang, Jin He, Shi-Chun Yu

The Protective Stretcher combines the benefits of a stretcher with that of a makeshift cast, by cushioning your body in place using airbags. The bags hold the injured patient in the supine position as the medics carry them out, avoiding any secondary injuries or paralysis that could occur during an emergency evacuation or transit. The airbags are laid out according to ergonomic and medical specifications, gently cushioning bones and joints to keep them in shape, while also keeping the head slightly elevated to prevent blood from rushing to the head.

Wathield Bucket by Ming-Sheng Shih

Ever tried to fill a big bucket in a tiny sink? If so, you know that it’s impossible to use the bucket’s full capacity because of the tilt. Even worse, if the sink is too small, you might not be able to fill it at all. Designed with these issues in mind, the WATHIELD bucket aims to make this everyday task much easier.
Shaped like a traditional bucket, it sports an additional feature in the form of an extended lip that funnels water into the bucket with ease. Better yet, it can be tucked away when it’s not being used. Simply unfold the lip and run it under the sink to capture water even if the space is compact.

Nipple Dust Mask by Jin-Ho Chae, Na-Yeun Kim

The Nipple Dust Mask is an unusual product that may just become a necessity in a few years, with rising environmental concerns about unchecked emissions. Designed to pacify as well as protect the baby’s young respiratory system, the Nipple Dust Mask keeps a child pacified, via a BPA-free polymer nipple, but also surrounds the nose and mouth with a HEPA filter that traps particulate matter, ensuring the child is breathing contaminant-free air.

Click Here to Submit Your Designs Now. Closes on June 30th.

These innovative paper plates are infinitely washable and reusable

Look closely and the Omotenasino Otomo don’t really look like paper plates. They look almost like plastic or melamine, with how incredibly glossy and opaque they are. The texture makes them almost look like cast iron, I’d say… but these plates aren’t made of any of those materials. They are, in fact, paper.

Japan’s fascination with paper spans over a millennium, with the introduction of Washi paper in 610 AD. It’s seen itself embedded in Japan’s culture, with its most popular use being in Origami, or the art of paper folding. The Omotenasino Otomo employ an Origami-esque pattern, and their innovation lies in the treatment of the paper, which makes it washable and reusable. This incredible ability comes from the design company Otomoshikki’s specialty lacquer, which allows the paper to turn into a stiff, waterproof, grease-proof, infinitely reusable material, almost perfect for utensils… and not just plates, spoons too!

The Omotenasino Otomo is a winner of the Design Intelligence Award for the year 2019.

Designer: Otomoshikki

Yamaha’s uniquely designed e-violin is all about the flair of the performance!

Short for the Yamaha Eletric Violin, the YEV explores a fundamental truth of electric instruments… and that is that electric instruments don’t need to worry about sound acoustics. A guitar is shaped the way it’s shaped so that air can vibrate in its hollow body. A drum too. Even a saxophone. But when you look at the electric versions of these instruments, you don’t need to worry about resonance, vibrations, and acoustics. That’s why an electric guitar is thinner and doesn’t have a hole. Electric drums are just literally tiles that you strike a drumstick against… and the YEV, just like with other electric instruments, doesn’t need to worry about hollow spaces and sound vibrations. However, what the YEV does with this liberation-from-volume is rather interesting, in that the violin is designed to be completely skeletal.

Looking at the YEV’s body, it’s easy to tell that it’s a violin, but I guess you’d spend a good 10 seconds marveling exactly how it treats surfaces and volumes… or in other words, how it looks. With an extremely streamlined body that houses all the electronics, the YEV comes with a relatively violin-esque silhouette, thanks to a curved wooden veneer that gives the violin its definition. The veneer also interestingly makes the YEV see-through, because the product doesn’t have a front or back, making for a very interesting performance, which is honestly what this violin is all about!

The YEV Electric Violin is a winner of the Design Intelligence Award for the year 2018.

Designer: Yamaha

Here are the hottest winning-designs from the A’ Design Award 2019

What makes the A’ Design Award stand out from others is its mission statement. It wants to find a common link between great design ACROSS all disciplines, and is committed to being a consortium or a common-ground for all sorts of good design. The A’ Design Award and Competition is more than just an awards program. It actively seeks good design, markets it, brings value to the project as well as the designer in the form of a wide range of value added services like a dedicated PR Campaign, a Gala Night with the world’s biggest design patrons and designers alike, a proof-of-creation document for your work, and even a platform to sell your design on.

The A’ Design Award’s perks aren’t just limited to winning designs, but also to participants. Your participation entitles you to a proof-of-creation document, inclusion in A’ Design’s Business Network, and the Design Fee Calculator service that lets you accurately price your design services for clients.

Judged by a grand jury of 209 elite designers and educators, here are a select few of A’ Design Award and Competition 2019’s winners. We’ve hand-picked some of our favorites from this year’s list of winners spanning categories such as Product Design, Lighting Design, Architecture, Furniture, Medical, and Social Design. Scroll down below to have a look at what’s making the waves this year in the design circuit! And don’t forget to register below to participate in the Competition next year to make the most of the opportunities that the A’ Design Award promises!

Grab an Early-bird Registration for A’ Design Awards 2020 by clicking here!

YD Handpicks: Winning Designs from A’ Design Awards 2018-19

01. RoType Flexible Keyboard by Royole

The RoType is a neat, rollable keyboard. Unlike those hideous flexible silicone/TPU keyboards that you now find on novelty gadget shops, the RoType is slick, professional, and classy. With a miraculously transparent keyboard that embraces and becomes the surface you place it on, the RoType feels sort of like typing on air. The keyboard uses a special film which contains a hidden circuit. With a transparency of 92%, and a thickness of a dazzling 0.04mm, the RoType flexes, stretches and curls multiple times without deformation. The flexible hidden circuit allows you to type by simply touching the keys, giving it an incredibly feathery UX… and when not in use, rolls right back into the RoType’s robust metal case, which is practically 1/10th the size of a regular keyboard!

02. Hexa Passenger Drone by Maform Design

We’ve all secretly waited for drones to be powerful enough to lift humans, haven’t we? While VTOLs are still somewhere in the near future, the Hexa passenger drone is a pretty plausible concept that demonstrates how a drone that lifts a human could look. With 18 propellers arranged in two circles (12 outside, 6 inside), the Hexa has a flight time of around half an hour. Where would one be able to travel in that much time? Maform Design thinks the Hexa isn’t a transportation device but an experience device. Designed to give you the experience of piloting a vertical take-off and landing vehicle, Hexa’s all about allowing riders to experience the thrill and adrenaline of drone flight! Maybe with advancing battery technologies we’ll see the Hexa turning into a proper short-distance transport solution!

03. Right Angle Screwdriver by Qian Xiaowei and Ye Xinmin

Designed for portability, and to get into those tough-to-reach spots, the Right Angle Screwdriver is a neat multi-tool with interchangeable heads and the ability to maneuver itself into difficult spots thanks to its novel design that allows the screwdriver to bend 90°. The miter-joint not only lets you reach screws in recessed places, but the 90° bend even gives you the power to unscrew or screw with much more torque. The size of a pen, the Right Angle Screwdriver is an ideal piece of EDC for the tinkerer, and its multiple heads just extend the product’s versatility!

04. The Barisieur by Josh Renouf

The Barisieur is a concept that’s definitely garnered its deserving share of interest. Featured on YD as a conceptual one-of-a-kind product years ago, the Barisieur has developed a lot over time, becoming the award-winning product it is today. What is it? Basically the best alarm clock ever made, because rather than jolting you out of sleep with an alarming noise, it gently and effectively awakens your senses by brewing you a fine cup of coffee! The alarm is hooked to a water heater which transfers the water to a pour-over coffee filter that decants your brew as you awake to the aroma of coffee. Paired with a small vessel of milk on the side (and a tray for storing your sugar), the Barisieur proposes perhaps the most effective way to get you out of bed. With a hot cuppa!

05. Twig Dumbbells by Ji Hoon Lee

When you think about it, a twig-shaped dumbbell is rather ironic, right? The word twig is often used to describe skinny or scrawny arms or legs, while on the other hand dumbbells, well, they help bulk up arms. The Twig dumbbells are an innovative dumbbell design by Ji Hoon Lee. With a handle and three prongs on each side, the weight of these dumbbells can be changed simply by switching the prongs.
The prongs or branches of the Twig are individual weights. Different prongs come with different weights and you can simply switch them to make each individual Twig heavier or lighter… although they’re sure to always look visually light, thanks to their twig-like form. Wait! That’s probably the idea! To get you to psychologically lift more by fooling your eyes into thinking you’re lifting tiny, weightless branches! Pretty clever!

06. Sidekick Notebook by Tan Mavitan

The Sidekick is quirky, but has logic to it. An A5 notebook looks small on your desk, but open it and it doubles in size, becoming an A4, and occupying precious real estate on your desk. The Sidekick has no such problem. Its unusual shape and diagonal spine allows it to open into an ‘L’ shaped notebook that can easily sit at the corner of your keyboard, or your mousepad, or even tablet. The notebook won’t serve well for sketching, but makes a good note-taking pad, offering both landscape and portrait writing areas. Take notes, make doodles, or probably even sketch on it if you can, the Sidekick is that one notebook you won’t buy and put away only because you’ll love keeping it on your table to occasionally take notes, and to perpetually show off.

07. Tsutsumu Card Holder by Hirotaka Satoh

It’s incredible what one can achieve out of a single piece of leather. The Tsutumu card holder is made from a stamped piece of leather. That’s literally the only production process it went through (aside from the branding being stamped into it too). No glue, no stitches, no rivets. Just pure leather. Basing itself on the Japanese culture of wrapping valued items carefully (google Furoshiki), the Tsutumu comes flat-packed and can easily be folded into shape. Its design ensures it holds its shape while holding cards within it too!
Elegant, simple, stylish, and differently vibrant, the Tsutumu cases wrap around your cards in a way that looks beautiful and unusual. The leather ages with time, gathering a beautiful patina, but the case itself lives on for years and years!

08. Kurio Modular Shelfing System by Markus Hofko

Designed like a breadboard that you plug electrical elements into, the Kurio Modular Shelfing System comes with a universal base-platform that you plug planes into, to make shelves. Based on the size and quantity of items you want to keep on your shelf, you can build any layout you choose by simply plugging pieces together. Made from aluminum, the Kurio doesn’t use additional fixtures like screws or glue, just good old mechanical joineries that allow the planes to be pulled apart and rearranged whenever you choose!

09. Symphony Number 7 Chair by Chen Ting-Hsiang

Similar in spirit to the Butterfly Chair by Eduardo Garcia Campos, the Symphony 7 Chair is inspired by the softness and sweetness of the 7th Symphony by Beethoven. The rocking chair is made from a pipe frame, and comes with leather cushioning, combining comfort, strength, and an incredibly organic skeletal design that makes for a great silhouette. The chair looks even beautiful when paired together with another of its kind, creating a beautiful symmetry!

10. Grid Table by Mian Wei

Made entirely of interlocking wooden pieces, the Grid Table takes inspiration from Chinese wooden structures called Dougongs (Dou Gong). Dougong is essential to the timber frame structure of traditional Chinese building, as it binds the roof, girders and pillars together to distribute weight evenly. The Grid table brings that approach to table-design, with its top-heavy-yet-stable construction that does a great job of distributing the table’s weight, while also turning the Dougong construction technique into an artform, with its wonderful, Jenga-esque geometric aesthetic!

Grab an Early-bird Registration for A’ Design Awards 2020 by clicking here!