Royole’s rollable keyboard design is even more flexible than its tablet!

Royole seems to be truly championing the flexible, foldable future. After the Flexpai, arguably the world’s first folding tablet, the California based startup is looking to embrace folding tech… especially with the RoType.

The RoType is a neat, rollable keyboard. Unlike those hideous flexible silicone/TPU keyboards that you now find on novelty gadget shops, the RoType is slick, professional, and classy. With a miraculously transparent keyboard that embraces and becomes the surface you place it on, the RoType feels sort of like typing on air.

The keyboard uses a special film which contains a hidden circuit. With a transparency of 92%, and a thickness of a dazzling 0.04mm, the RoType flexes, stretches and curls multiple times without deformation. The flexible hidden circuit allows you to type by simply touching the keys, giving it an incredibly feathery UX… and when not in use, rolls right back into the RoType’s robust metal case.

All of the RoType’s critical hardware lies in its metallic case. The case, other than encasing the flexible keyboard when rolled up, houses all the important electronics, and connects wirelessly to any device to allow you to type with ease. The RoType comes with a complete, full-length keyboard that even packs function keys on the top, and doesn’t compromise on key-size… so you’ve got a perfectly capable and feature-laden keyboard in a form-factor that’s 1/10th the size of a physical keyboard. That’s pretty impressive if you ask me!

The Royole RoType is a winner of the A’ Design Award for the year 2019.

Designer: Royole

This modular PC aims to repurpose and lessen our electronic waste

New technologies being released every day promise a futuristic look that is years ahead of the current devices. But with the speed at which our technology evolves, the same devices begin to feel out-dated and due for a refresh within a couple of years. The Level is a modular Home PC concept that explores how users can be encouraged to retain their devices for a longer period of time, even after their primary use is over!

The modular and highly adaptable home computer’s flexibility centers around the building blocks that provide even the least experienced users to upgrade the aging hardware; The pyramid of blocks is neatly concealed within the aesthetically-clean casing. It isn’t just the extended life-cycle of the product that has been considered, but also the user experience has been explored in great detail; from adjustable articulation of the screen through to the intuitive and fuss-free user interface, it’s certainly a device we would love to see in our homes for years to come!

Designer: Louis Berger

The Bone Mouse doesn’t follow ergonomic design by the book

With a profile that one can best describe as influenced by Ross Lovegrove’s iconic Andromeda Lamp, the Bone Mouse experiments with form and mass… or rather the lack of it.

This is the Bone Mouse, a mouse that’s skeletal in form, yet functional. Based off an older design of Jin’s, the Bone Mouse retains the mouse’s most crucial surface, its top, and turns the rest of the mouse into a voronoi playground. I’m not entirely sure how comfortable holding the Bone Mouse would be, but I imagine one’s fingers would easily get used to the negative spaces. In fact, they’d probably go on to become fidget-worthy, as our thumb runs up and down the hollow spaces.

Sticking to its bony, basic aesthetic, the mouse is even devoid of details like buttons or scroll-wheels. Instead, the mouse’s entire top surface is touch-sensitive, allowing you to tap, scroll, or even pinch to interact with digital elements!

Designer: Lingsong Jin

The Braille-book brings computing one step closer to inclusiveness

The minute I say the words All-In-One PC, what do you think of? A screen, right? An iMac-esque display that houses a CPU within it, and all you need is a keyboard and a mouse. The caveat with that setup, however, is that a display is literally the last thing a visually impaired person needs. The Braille-book, designed around this unique yet existing problem, merely shifts all the electronics into a keyboard. The Braille-book is an all-in-one PC that’s designed to be housed within the keyboard, and can easily be hooked to a monitor and a mouse.

The monitor, keyboard, and mouse are completely essential to the computing experience, and the Braille-book just simply changes which device takes the center-stage. The keyboard comes with ports that let you hook all the peripherals you need to it, and even packs a dynamic braille display along its base, with keys to match. Since the visually impaired constantly need to touch and feel their way around a keyboard surface to know which keys they have their fingers on, the Braille-book packs an easy alternative. The braille display at the base shifts and changes based on your typing needs, switching between alphabetical to numeric, and above it lie a row of keys that correspond to each braille unit. The user runs their finger along the dynamic braille display and when they find the right character, they press the key above it. The Braille-book even packs its own in-built speakers that improve accessibility by providing audio feedback to the user as they use the computer. Alternatively, right beside the HDMI port (for a display, if you do need one) is a headphone jack that lets you hook up headphones to the all-in-one PC for a more personal, private browsing experience. Computers, for the longest time, have developed more around the visual sense than any other sense. The Braille-book corrects that imbalance.

Designer: Youngdo Choi

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

It’s been roughly two years since the first time we saw a flexible-screen device (or imagined it) and to be honest, we still haven’t figured out WHY exactly we need one. The only conceivable answer seems to be that mobiles are running into a creative roadblock and flexible phones seem to be the only way out, but differentiation can’t be the only reason to add a bending screen to a gadget, no?

Designer Hyeong Seop Lee seems to have a pretty incredible use for bending displays. The FRAME is a flexible-gadget designed by Lee that uses OLED technology to serve many masters… because the FRAME is capable of being a tablet, a laptop, and even a desktop! With a flexible spine running right along the middle, the FRAME can be carried around folded much like a laptop. Open it out completely and you’ve got yourself a pretty big 15-inch tablet that’s great for multi-tasking, browsing, sketching, and watching movies on. Fold the tablet along its flexible spine and one half of the screen immediately turns into a touchscreen keyboard, giving you the ability to use the FRAME as you would a laptop. In its laptop mode, you can practically angle the display in any way, propping it up vertically just like you would a laptop screen, allowing you to alternate between tablet and laptop whenever you want-need.

When you’re looking for more firepower, the FRAME has the ability of becoming your all-in-1 PC. With a dock that allows it to stand vertically (while also supplying power to it), the FRAME becomes your very own desktop, allowing you to connect keyboards, mice, hard-drives, thumb-drives and even the occasional SD card to it (it even packs an audio jack), giving you all the benefits of a desktop in a gadget that also possesses all the merits of a laptop and tablet. With USB and HDMI ports on its side, along with a card-reader and audio jack, the FRAME is a no-holds-barred tablet. Factor in the flexible OLED display and the FRAME becomes a pretty remarkable laptop. Finally add the dock to the mix and the FRAME easily becomes the most versatile desktop in the world, allowing you to carry your data/work/entertainment with you, and giving you the sheer joy of having three completely different products in one singular design.

This article is also an open-letter to Samsung, which should clearly take some lessons from Lee’s design. Flexible displays are capable of being MUCH more than just a novelty. The FRAME proves it.

Designer: Hyeong Seop Lee

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

This portable armrest makes working on computers much more comfortable

The Mouzen is a product that previously never existed in a category that previously never existed. However, it’s one of those products that should pretty much instantly catch on, given how incredibly valuable it is in terms of upping comfort, and productivity.

The Mouzen, and I find it weird even saying this, is a portable armrest. Why would you need one? Because it’s designed specifically to support your arm as you work on a computer. Think of it as one of those padded mousepads, but less of an afterthought, and more of an actually useful product. What makes the Mouzen pretty innovative is that it mounts on your table, leveling your arms at the correct height, unlike the armrests on your chair that are placed at arbitrary heights… that’s if your chair even HAS armrests.

The Mouzen cantilevers right off your table, giving your forearm a place to rest comfortably, instead of hovering in space. The platform retrofits easily onto the edge of any table, and takes not more than 10 seconds to fasten. The platform comes with a freely moving armrest that sits on top of it. Using a patented ErgoFlow mechanism, the armrest moves and rotates in any direction with near-zero friction, giving you the ability to freely move your hand around as you switch from mouse to keyboard and back, typing, clicking, scrolling, etc. Built to take up to 50 lbs (21 kg) of weight, the mechanism has multiple shock absorbers and silencers built in to ensure the Mouzen works smoothly and silently.

Designed to be a product that’s easy to carry and set up, and comfortable to use over long periods of time, the Mouzen helps reduce repetitive strain caused by working on a desktop or laptop without the proper arm support. In turn, it helps prevent injuries and ailments like Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Tendonitis, and in turn boosts productivity by keeping your hand well-rested and comfortable. With its ability to retrofit on any desk at any height, the Mouzen can be used in offices (even with standing desks), cyber cafes, or even at home for freelancers and dedicated PC Gamers, promising hours of work and efficiency without any of the wrist-pain.

Designer: Gašper Kumprej

Click Here To Buy Now: $89 $120 (25% Off). Hurry, Limited Early Bird Offer!

Mouzen employs the best of ergonomics and industrial design. It optimizes the position of your arm and reduce wrist and shoulder tension while working with your mouse and keyboard.

With its ErgoFlow mechanism, it allows you to move freely and comfortably in all directions, supporting your arm in a natural state and forcing you to maintain an upright posture.

It works great on almost all surfaces and is suitable for desks of thickness 0.2″ (0.5 cm) – 2.1″ (5.5 cm). Every Mouzen comes with a hex key that will allow you to lock it securely on your desk.

The Mouzen cantilevers right off your table, giving your forearm a place to rest comfortably, instead of hovering in space. The platform retrofits easily onto the edge of any table, and takes not more than 10 seconds to fasten.

Thanks to the innovative ErgoFlow mechanism, Mouzen can hold up to 50 lbs (21 kg) of load, without losing any movement properties. The mechanism has multiple shock absorbers and silencers built in, making it the most smooth and silent ergonomic armrest on the market.

Mouzen helps reduce repetitive strain caused by working on a desktop or laptop without the proper arm support.

In turn, it helps prevent injuries and ailments like Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Tendonitis, and in turn boosts productivity by keeping your hand well-rested and comfortable.

Click Here To Buy Now: $89 $120 (25% Off). Hurry, Limited Early Bird Offer!

The Manta Mouse is a mouse and mousepad all-in-one!

The Manta Mouse takes inspiration from the Manta Ray, with its wide, stingray-inspired design. At the very center is a bulbous volume forms the bulk of the mouse, the part your palm rests on, while the rest of the mouse skirts around the side. This side-skirt essentially works as a cushion for the base of your palm, promising to give your hand a comfortable place to rest as you operate the mouse. The mouse’s finish looks like blackened cork too, so you’ve essentially got yourself a mouse that isn’t rigid, bulky, and uncomfortable. It’s almost like a recliner chair… for your hands!

Designer: Alberto Aguado Baudil for Render Weekly

Microsoft’s flattest, most flexible, functional mouse yet

Curved when you want, flat when you need, the Arc Surface mouse by Microsoft follows a format it set a long time ago. The mouse comes as a flat, remote-ish shape and can bend/curve/arc into an ergonomic mouse when needed. When you’re done, the mouse unfolds and becomes flat again.

The Arc Surface mouse, however, has a key difference that makes it rather useful and advanced. It ditches the clicking keys and scroll wheel for a touch surface, much like Apple’s Magic Mouse. The surface lets you perform right and left clicks, but its capacitive-touch property also lets you scroll sideways, vertically, and just generally navigate with precision and intuition. And when you’re done, the mouse flattens into a remote-ish form that’s rather easy to slip into bags without occupying any bulk!

Designer: Microsoft

Click Here to Buy Now

Click Here to Buy Now

This hemispherical mouse adds a different aesthetic to your work-desk

Look at the Hemisphere and tell me it isn’t adorably eye-catching. The mouse’s name pretty much tells you all you need to know. Its design is a perfect hemisphere, unlike most organically-designed computer mice, and features the standard two click buttons and a scroller, but laid out in the mouse’s half-sphere design.

The mouse has, for too long, been bound to ergonomics-influenced design. I am, by no means, bashing ergonomics, but different mice appeal to different people. There’s no one-glove-fits-all design for computer mice. The Hemisphere takes advantage of that. Much like holding a cricket or tennis ball, the Hemisphere’s half-spherical construction feels comfortable yet sort of radical too. Plus, I can’t get enough of that glossy green finish!

Designer: Deokhee Jeong for Render Weekly

Samsung’s latest space-saving design-driven monitors are an absolute win

I remember some 3-4 years ago when Samsung released their Serif TV and I couldn’t possibly imagine what the company was thinking. The TV was hideous, as it tried to tread the line between domestic appliance and gadget. Then one year later, Samsung debuted their QLED TVs with the Ambient Mode that, rather than making the TV stand out, made it blend in. The Ambient Mode was a work of genius, and showed that Samsung took research and design seriously rather than just coming up with eye-catching forms.

Their latest product, the Space Monitor reaffirms my belief that Samsung can make some spectacular products that are also state-of-the-art. The Space Monitor (SR75) does literally what it says. Made to give you a remarkably better desktop experience, the monitor saves tonnes of space on your workdesk by clamping to the edge of your desk, allowing the Monitor be pushed back up against the wall. Most monitors come with large, bulky stands, only because they’re so big and unstable. The Space Monitor doesn’t have that problem, because it relies on a vice-grip rather than a stand. A large arm connects the grip to the screen, allowing you to push the monitor back and forth, giving you the comfort of having a wall-mounted screen at times, and a screen that’s up-close at other times. Angles can be easily adjusted too, without the worry of anything toppling over, or even without having to make space on your desk. Samsung goes the extra mile to use this long, wide arm to conceal power cables and HDMI cables too, giving you a monitor that’s just simply beautiful and keeps your workspace empty and clean.

The Space Monitor comes in two size variants… a 27-inch model with QHD resolution and a 32-inch model that’s 4K UHD. Announced ahead of CES 2019, we’ll probably get a better look at it in the coming week, but one thing’s for sure. Samsung’s certainly putting design to good use!

Designer: Samsung

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