Top 5 Job Openings at YD Job Board for this week

As a part of our careers-related columns, these are our top five picks of the best industrial design opportunities on Yanko Design’s recruitment platform YD Job Board. This week brings you openings from designing a boat to creating analog synthesizers and many more interesting opportunities.

Check out Yanko Design Job Board for more design openings.

Want your requirement to be featured along with these global design-driven companies? Post a Job with us right away!


Junior Industrial Designer at Moog Synthesizers

Moog Music is the leading manufacturer of analog synthesizers in the world. Our Employee-owned company and its customers carry on the legacy of our founder, electronic musical instrument pioneer, Dr. Bob Moog. Moog employs a group of wonderfully diverse individuals who share a passion for discovering elegant solutions that empower creative self-expression and joyous experimentation. We are seeking inspired individuals to join our team as we synthesize new experiences to enrich the creative community. The role of Junior Industrial Designer requires a self-driven creative with a passion for original design and out-of-the-box thinking. This individual will support the Design and Marketing departments through the implementation of specified directives pertaining to product modeling/rendering, graphic design, physical conceptual mock-ups, and trade show installations. This is a full-time position that reports directly to the Director of Design.

Read more details about this job 

Designer at Nautique Boat Company

Join Our Team: Nautique Boat Company has an outstanding career opportunity available at our boat manufacturing facility in East Orlando, FL. We are celebrating over 90 years of excellence in the marine industry. Nautique Boat Company is a subsidiary of Correct Craft and has been on the waters of the world with a passion for innovation since 1925. Nautique is known to push the envelope of possibility on the water, and our owners have come to expect nothing but the absolute best. The world’s best ski boat, world’s best wake boat, and a company that cares. Through our Nautique Cares initiatives, we’re dedicated to not only making a difference on the water but to people in need around the world. As a Designer II, you will work as an integral member of Nautique’s Product Design and Development (PD&D) team helping design our award-winning Nautique wakeboard, waterski and wake surf boats. This person will help ensure that future designs will be the highest quality in safety, design, efficiency and customer satisfaction. Be a part of a team that allows you to bring your passion and skills to our highly collaborative environment. Be a part of the talents responsible for the development of all award-winning wakeboard, waterski and wake surf boats produced by Nautique Boats.

Read more details about this job 

Junior Designer, Planning & Architecture at Pandiscio Green

Pandiscio Green is a New-York based creative studio specializing in brand creation, marketing, advertising, creative direction, and exhibition design. Our work includes a range of projects in luxury real estate, hospitality, art, culture, and publishing. We collaborate with artists, architects, museums, galleries and developers, among them Jean Nouvel, Herzog & de Meuron, SHoP Architects, Rem Koolhaas / OMA, Bjarke Ingels, Four Seasons Hotel, The Standard, Hotel Americano, The Mark Hotel, John Currin, David Salle, Peter Doig, Neue Galerie, Starr Restaurants, Union Square Hospitality and Major Food Group. Pandiscio Green is seeking an eager, ambitious, and highly-creative Junior Designer, Planning & Architecture to join the team. An ideal candidate is a strong conceptual thinker and confident at tackling a brief from beginning to end. This individual is responsible for conceptualization, establishing direction and design solutions, and ensuring the highest quality production on all fronts. The Junior Designer, Planning & Architecture must have excellent verbal and visual presentation skills, the ability to explain and substantiate design direction to the team and clients, and a willingness to push the extravagant and celebrate the non-traditional.

Read more details about this job 

Sr UX/UI Designer at Drone Deploy

DroneDeploy makes software for drones that helps businesses manage complex job sites. Our software automates everything from flight to insight, allowing teams to survey large areas and make informed decisions quickly, safely, and accurately. We’re making drone data accessible and useful across all industries, improving site communications, planning, and operations. We are the leading drone software company with over 4,000 customers that have flown over 1 million flights, across 180 countries! We’re looking for an experienced Senior UX Designer to help build and strengthen our design team and propel the company towards its goal to make drone data available to everyone.

Read more details about this job 

Drafter/ Project Designer at Twoseven Inc.

TWOSEVEN is a multidisciplinary design/build firm located in Brooklyn, New York. We specialize in the creation of store window displays, retail interiors, and showrooms for high-profile fashion, luxury and lifestyle brands in NYC, and for export worldwide. TWOSEVEN combines a design studio, fabrication workshop, and installation team, all under one roof, providing our clients with a wide range of services. No matter the size of the project, excellent craftsmanship, high-quality design, and attention to detail are essential in all of the work that we do. Currently seeking experienced drafter with excellent design skills + fabrication experience. We are looking for a multitalented individual with previous experience in event, exhibition, and retail design. Must be able to work quickly and accurately, solve problems, and be self-directed. Responsibilities include drafting shop drawings, producing install directives, and assisting project managers in creating renders for client presentations. Hands-on fabrication experience encouraged. The ideal candidate will have a positive, helpful attitude, good judgment, and problem-solving skills. Must be able to work under pressure and crazy deadlines, while staying calm and focused.

Read more details about this job 


Check out all the latest design openings on Yanko Design Job Board

Or recruit your ideal candidate by posting a job here!

 

Google will have offices and data centers in 24 states by the end of 2019

Google is still closely associated with California to many people (and to a lesser degree New York), but it's determined to change that reputation. The company is launching a $13 billion expansion in 2019 that will give it a total US footprint of 24...

Top 5 Industrial Design Jobs for this week

00 title

As a part of our careers-related columns, these are our top five picks of the best industrial design opportunities on Yanko Design’s recruitment platform YD Job Board. This week brings you openings at LEGO, Bose, Tasty and more interesting opportunities.

Check out Yanko Design Job Board for more design openings.

Want your requirement to be featured along with these global design-driven companies? Post a Job with us right away!


01 Image

Senior Creative Automotive Designer at Mercedes-Benz Research & Development North America, Inc.

Mercedes-Benz Research & Development North America, Inc. in Carlsbad, CA seeks a Senior Creative Automotive Designer: Contribute to Advanced and Production Design projects, create sketches and renderings, and deliver design presentations.

Read more details about this job 

02 Image

Industrial Designer at Playmobil ( the geobra Brandstätter Foundation & Co. KG)

With more than 4 400 employees worldwide, the geobra Brandstätter Stiftung & Co. KG is a true global player. In addition to the company headquarters in Zirndorf near Nuremberg and currently four production sites throughout Europe, the company has a total of twelve international sales subsidiaries. The two brands PLAYMOBIL and LECHUZA stand for tradition, innovation and top quality. From development to production, commitment and motivation are required of all employees in order to continue the success story together.

Read more details about this job 

03 Image

Senior Design Engineer at Rich Brilliant Willing

Rich Brilliant Willing is a Brooklyn-based studio that designs and manufactures LED fixtures for hospitality, workplace, and residential projects. Incorporated in 2009 by Theo Richardson, Charles Brill and Alexander Williams, the studio has been a pioneering force in the use of LEDs in contemporary design, recognizing its potential to bring both warmth and energy efficiency to everyday life. Today, through an experimental approach guided by technology, creativity, and simplicity, the studio continues to break new ground in lighting design. Products range from subtle to statement pieces, continually providing new solutions to architects’ and designers’ needs. Part start-up, part design firm, RBW prides itself on being a different kind of company, one that builds direct relationships with specifiers and oversees its manufacturing and production details directly. What began as a three-person studio a decade ago has grown into a 30+ person team with a global network of vendors, specifiers, and customers. In this role, the Senior Design Engineer will be part of our Product Development Team. As a key member of our design team, you will have the opportunity to be on the ground level of a wide range of product development activities; from design and development to prototyping and testing, to working with a cross-functional team in order to drive an idea from concept to production.

Read more details about this job 

04 Image

Senior Experience Designer at Universal Robots

We believe that collaborative robotic technology can be used to benefit all aspects of task-based businesses – no matter what their size. Our robot arms are advanced tools that can be used by all levels of production staff to help increase productivity, reduce injury, and boost morale. With a Universal Robots robot arm, you can automate and streamline repetitive or potentially unsafe processes, so staff can be assigned to jobs that provide them with new challenges. We believe that the latest collaborative robot technology should be available to all businesses. As a Senior Experience Designer in our Boston R&D Department, you will be responsible for continuously improving and innovating our software user interfaces across Universal Robots products. We are looking for a seasoned designer who thrives in ambiguity, has a strong human-centered design process, has the desire to learn and collaborate cross-functionally, and designs systematic solutions that are equally thoughtful, elegant, and delightful.

Read more details about this job 

05 Image

Freelance Industrial Designer at Prime Studio

Prime Studio is a Product + Brand design consultancy based in the heart of midtown Manhattan. We’re a small team with big ideas. Our insights and thinking have been trusted since 1998 by some of the best companies and most talked-about brands. We love what we do. We value our clients. We embrace a good challenge. Visit our website for more background on what we do and how we do it. We are looking for people who are interested in designing for a range of markets including consumer products, personal care and structural packaging and who can hit the ground running. We’re a fast-paced office and a previous consultancy experience is a big plus.

Read more details about this job 


Check out all the latest design openings on Yanko Design Job Board

Or recruit your ideal candidate by posting a job here!

 

YD Job Board: Openings at LEGO, Bose and more

00 Title

As a part of our careers-related columns, these are our top five picks of the best industrial design opportunities on Yanko Design’s recruitment platform YD Job Board. This week brings you openings at LEGO, Bose, Tasty and more interesting opportunities.

Check out Yanko Design Job Board for more design openings.

Want your requirement to be featured along with these global design-driven companies? Post a Job with us right away!


01 Image

Product Designer at Lego

In a culture where collaboration and creativity are key, you will work closely in teams to brainstorm, create and design products that delight and inspire children globally. You will join a large international design team in Billund, counting approximately 300 designers from around the world, who are all passionate about the impact of play. You are passionate about creating fun play experiences for kids. To be a successful designer at LEGO®, you enjoy working in a team, you want to learn, and you know how to create playful concepts. We are looking for new talented designers to sketch, prototype, develop and build new play experiences and concepts. As a LEGO® designer you will create the world#s best building and play experiences for boys and girls through brands like LEGO Super Heroes, LEGO Disney, LEGO City, Creator, LEGO Technic, LEGO Friends and DUPLO.

Read more details about this job 

02 Image

Industrial Designer, Consumer Products Director at Epoca International

Epoca International is a designer and distributor of consumer houseware products. Epoca is focused on building strong consumer brands and driving innovation within the marketplace. Within the portfolio includes Ecolution Cookware, Primula Beverage Products, Tasty home goods, Goodful kitchen products, and Cooking Light products, as well as a variety of private label retailer offerings. Epoca is looking for a talented Industrial Designer, highly proficient in 3D CAD as well as hand drawing.

Read more details about this job 

03 Image

Hardware User Experience Designer at Bose

Bose is a research company dedicated to developing breakthrough technologies and quality products that enrich people’s lives. To do so, we take a different approach than most companies. The result is a longstanding reputation for innovation and quality. Reaching our goals requires uniquely talented individuals with a strong desire to grow and achieve. Individuals who share the values of passion, innovation, excellence, respect and integrity that are embedded throughout our organization today. You find the results of their work all around you—in homes, automobiles, supersonic jets, retail stores, restaurants, and stadiums. We are capable and curious individuals who champion user-centered design. Our work reaches and delights millions of people daily. We are professionals skilled in multi-faceted interaction design creation. We derive satisfaction by creating the best hardware, software, and mobile application experiences. This role focuses on hardware-based user experience challenges.

Read more details about this job 

04 Image

Senior Industrial Designer at Kelty

KELTY is looking for a talented, passionate, outdoor lovin’ designer to join the product design team. Starting in the garage of Dick Kelty, the brand has humble beginnings dating back to 1952. KELTY has since become a trusted brand for backpacking and camping gear. No one believes in work hard, play hard more than KELTY. So, if you’re ready to help push the boundaries of design and gear, check out the details below and apply to join us in the pursuit of outdoor awesomeness! The Senior Designer will lead and develop market disruptive, creative design concepts and solutions that address the specific product requirements as formalized in the design briefs. The Sr. Designer will develop new products under Kelty’s design principles which will coincide with Kelty’s overall brand strategy. They will report to the Sr. Creative Director to translate design concepts, sketches, drawings, and prototypes into the final product sample.

Read more details about this job 

05 Image

Senior Industrial Designer at TEAMS Design

TEAMS is an award winning design firm with over 100 professionals including designers, engineers and strategists, all from diverse backgrounds. You can think of us as a colorful mix, just like our brand colors. We specialize in global product-oriented brand development in the areas of industrial design, user experience design and brand communication. To us, the word ‘product’ transcends what is tangible and also includes services, results, solutions and ideas that help a brand or company to achieve their mission. Our talent to take concepts all the way from strategy to realization sets us apart and makes us experts in delivering strategies that can be successfully implemented and sustained. We are a truly global company, our flourishing studios are located in Esslingen, Hamburg, Chicago, Belgrade, and in Shanghai. Never staying in the same place for too long, our team of designers, engineers and strategists are constantly on-the-go, making each studio their ‘home.’ With nearly 60 years of experience and over 1,000 prestigious design awards, we are one of the longest-running design consultancies in the world.

Read more details about this job 


Check out all the latest design openings on Yanko Design Job Board

Or recruit your ideal candidate by posting a job here!

YD Job Board’s top 5 picks with jobs at Amazon and more

00 Title

As a part of our careers-related columns, these are our top five picks of the best industrial design opportunities on Yanko Design’s recruitment platform YD Job Board. With some famous names across our board, this week’s pick includes openings at Amazon, Johnson & Johnson, CONAIR and more interesting opportunities.

Check out Yanko Design Job Board for more design openings.

Want your requirement to be featured along with these global design-driven companies? Post a Job with us right away!


01 Image

Creative Director at Amazon

As a Creative Director, you will be responsible for the end to end user experience for Amazon Key. This involves the full Amazon Key App, and touchpoints in service and delivery design, Amazon.com landing pages, shopping experience, hardware integration, and packaging. Challenges will include designing patterns, new experiences, evolving the product and finding balance with other 3P apps. You will define and drive the design vision for a complex set of product portfolios, some of which will be the first of their kind. To be successful in this role you will have designed innovative products and multi-modal systems, and you will need to understand how to implement design strategies across multiple devices and device types.

Read more details about this job 

02 Image

Design Manager, Industrial Design & Human Factors at Johnson & Johnson

Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies. Caring for the world, one person at a time has inspired and united the people of Johnson & Johnson for 125 years. We embrace research and science — bringing innovative ideas, products, and services to advance the health and well-being of people.  The Product (Travel) Designer is responsible for delivering all aspects of the design from concept to pre-production via prototyping, testing, sourcing, color/fabric/trims processes, and specification packages (tech-packs). The Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices (JJMDC) Industrial Design and Human Factors (IDHF) organization is seeking a Design Manager (Level 1) to support the growing Orthopedic Solutions Team. With worldwide sales of over $27 billion, Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices is one of the world’s largest, most innovative surgical companies. We are a growing organization with over 8 global and domestic IDHF teams within the Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices (JJMDC) sector.

Read more details about this job 

03 Image

Senior R&D Designer / R&D Designer at CONAIR

CONAIR is a leading developer, manufacturer, and marketer of nationally branded personal, health & beauty products, kitchen and electronic appliances, it’s founding since 1959, with it Far East Headquarter in Kwun Tong ( Near Ngau Tau Kok MTR Station ).  The Product (Travel) Designer is responsible for delivering all aspects of the design from concept to pre-production via prototyping, testing, sourcing, color/fabric/trims processes, and specification packages (tech-packs). This position must meet multiple deadlines and goals in regard to analyzing research and designing products for presentations to customers, new product development and research projects. The Industrial Designer must possess design skills, free hand, computer-aided design, and sample making. They must have complete understanding of the new product development process and basic engineering skills in order to work with engineering to ensure manufacturability of the designs created. This position requires great attention to detail and up-to-date knowledge of computer-aided design, model making and design technique to enhance the performance of the duties.

Read more details about this job 

04 Image

Senior Product Designer at NEMO Equipment, Inc.

NEMO is a New Hampshire-based outdoor gear design company known for creating award-winning products that are built to last, comfortable and fun to use. In the company’s 17 years, it has been awarded many of the most prestigious design awards in the outdoor industry and has established brand recognition around the world. But despite the success of the brand, the team still has the spirit of a start-up, with a fully collaborative, highly creative, radically innovative approach that resembles a hungry, young company more than a well-established corporation. The company is looking for an experienced, talented, highly motivated senior industrial designer to join the Product team. The right person will have exceptional skills at the drawing table, the CAD station, the prototyping shop, and the sewing machine. A true love of making things. And a great intuitive understanding of mechanics coupled with a strong sensibility for aesthetics. Plus, a penchant for managing complex projects and keeping things organized.

Read more details about this job 

05 Image

Industrial Designer at SimpliSafe

SimpliSafe Home Security is a disruptive tech company, with big ideas and a team full of people who are chomping at the bit to make them happen. Simplisafe is looking for an Industrial Designer as we scale our Product Design team. In this role, you will help design our next generation of Simplisafe branded home security products. This role is a great opportunity to influence and contribute to a new Product Design team. We are in the midst of an aggressive hiring plan to fill our needs as we prepare for our next steps as a company. The Product Design team is a primary focus and our Head of Product Design will be building his team from the ground up. As such, you will have an opportunity to make an immediate impact on Simplisafe’s product design and you will be in a great position to grow within the department as Simplisafe continues to expand.

Read more details about this job 


Check out all the latest design openings on Yanko Design Job Board

Or recruit your ideal candidate by posting a job here!

What to expect from Design Testing

01 Title

Designers will design but the validation of the said design comes from its actual users. Take any scenario we can think up of into account, the best results are often achieved once we get inputs from multiple potential users or in other words by doing ‘Design Testing.’ With all the hype and hoopla asserted with regards to testing, it is better to step into that arena with an open mind and goals as to what are your expectations. In that case, there are lesser chances of getting lost in all the feedback you receive. To clear the noise around design testing, the article below by Jonas Downey at SignalvNoise walks us through his thought process about design testing and what to expect when you’re testing!

Looking to hire a talented designer? Post a job with us to source the best talent for your requirement.

Want an amazing internship or job opportunity? Check out YD Job Board to work at some of the best design companies in the world.


02 Image

If you search the Internet to learn about A/B testing, you’ll find scads of articles bursting with tips for cranking your business performance into the stratosphere.

You’ll get blazing hot secrets like…

BOOST YOUR CONVERSION RATE BY 300% WITH THIS TINY TWEAK

and…

DESTROY YOUR COMPETITION USING A STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT SHADE OF BLUE

…and it just keeps going like that, into an overenthusiastic pit of armchair psychology and semi-authoritative pseudoscience.


As the gurus tell it, A/B testing is like Vegas slots: plunk some crap into a machine, score a handful of 🍒🍒🍒s, and voilà, Easy Bake Revenue!

With a pitch like that, who could resist? It sounds so simple. If you don’t do it, you’re obviously a fool who’s leaving money on the table.

Well, I have a couple of hard truths for ya:

  1. It’s not as easy as it sounds, and those big gains aren’t such a sure thing.
  2. Setting out to dramatically boost some arbitrary metric (signups, conversions, revenue, whatever) is exactly the wrong way to approach a design problem.

How do I know this?

I spent most of last year testing dozens of conversion-related design ideas in Basecamp, and I found that the JACKED UP PERFORMANCE aspect is the least interesting part of the process, by far.

The most interesting part is how it can change your thinking. Testing is a ticket to ride. It energizes your adventurous spirit, introduces you to uncharted territory, and lands you in cool places you never expected to go.

Here’s what I learned, and why I’ve come to love doing experimental design.

03 Image

Testing turns your designs to trash

After running tests for a while, you’ll find yourself throwing away mountains of design work for just a handful of meaningful improvements.

Do that enough, and you’ll notice something: Maybe design isn’t such a special endeavor after all!

The truth is…a lot of design is ephemeral, malleable, disposable…garbage.

Anything you make today merely represents one moment in time. Maybe it’s your best idea now, but it’s not necessarily the best idea you’ll have in another two days or two months.

Testing makes this painfully obvious on a shorter time scale. You’ll soon become less emotionally invested in your precious creations, and more focused on the problems you care about.

Testing strengthens your gusto

I don’t know about you, but it took me years to build up the confidence to make hard design decisions. I still struggle with it sometimes.

You have to succeed and fail a lot. You have to take criticism a lot. And you have to trust your gut and keep at it, day after day.

Experimentation is a great way to build that muscle. It’s an opportunity to try things you aren’t completely sure about and gives you a sweet little safety net for failures.

04 Image

Testing makes you thoughtful

It can be tempting to do experiments like the lottery: throw a bunch of random shit at the wall and then declare victory when one thing performed best by random chance.

You might get lucky a few times that way, but it’s a terrible long-term approach. Without some overarching vision, you’ll be left with a gnarly mess of test results born from guesses, and no clear plan for what to do next.

The better way, of course, is to start with good ideas! Do some research, come up with educated hypotheses and concepts you believe in, then build and test them to verify your thinking instead of defining it.

Testing destroys perfectionism

It’s so freeing to ship a bare-bones version of an idea because it’s “just a test” that you’ll either improve or throw away when it’s done.

If you thought that same design had to stick around permanently, you’d probably never launch it with a lot of known flaws or incomplete parts. You’d want to fix up every last detail and make everything perfect first.

Amazingly, those rough, imperfect tests often outperform the supposedly perfected version you already had in place. When you see that, you’ll realize your outsized attention to detail might not matter as much as you thought.

A license for imperfection is an extremely useful defense against Fussy Designer disease. We should all be vaccinated early and often.

Testing builds empathy

This sounds counterintuitive: running an experiment is mostly a pragmatic and statistical kind of thing. How is that related to empathy?

It’s related because you’re forced to learn what happens when real human people interact with your work. Your choices all have directly measurable effects, so you can’t hide behind bullshitty designer speak or vague justifications when the data shows you’re just flat wrong.

That means you have to get outside your insular designer bubble, stop thinking of people as numbers, and get in their shoes a bit.

When you do that, the business boosts you want will happen as a natural side effect of continually tuning your product to serve your customers’ real-life situations. Making things clearer or more efficient for your customers always pays off.

05 Image

Testing helps you make space

One tough challenge in UI design is making physical space for new things you want to do. There’s only so much room on a screen!

You might have ideas that require injecting steps into an existing UI flow, adding more screens, revising a visual hierarchy, or rearranging certain navigational elements.

Doing stuff like that is a gamble. You might be confident that your new version is better in some way, but are you sure your improvements are worth the extra steps or added complexity?

Testing lets you dip your toes in the water. You can run a short experiment and see if you’re busting your business before committing to a direction.

Testing tells the truth

The truth is weird. Sometimes common sense wins out. Sometimes a wild idea succeeds. Sometimes a version you hated performs the best. Sometimes your favorite design turns out to be a total stinker.

Where else in the design world can you get opinion-free feedback like this? There are no Art Directors or Product Managers or App Store reviewers telling you what they think is right. It’s real human nature telling you what’s right!

It’s a fascinating, powerful, bizarre reality.


The original write up by Jonas Downey published on SignalvNoise can be found here.

Our endeavor is to increase efficiency and speed by connecting you to your ideal candidates. Yanko Design has curated Industrial Design followers for the past 15+ years, and we know these are the best match for your company. To recruit now,  Post a Job with us!

06 image

Top 5 Industrial Design Jobs for this week

00 Title

As a part of our careers-related columns, these are our top five picks of the best industrial design opportunities on Yanko Design’s recruitment platform YD Job Board. With some famous names across our board, this week’s pick includes openings at the backpack innovators Osprey, quirky design products at Oxo along with sporting and fitness product designers.

Check out Yanko Design Job Board for more design openings.

Want your requirement to be featured along with these global design-driven companies? Post a Job with us right away!


01 Osprey

Product Designer – Travel at Osprey Packs, Inc.

Osprey Packs is seeking a dynamic team player to join our Design Team in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The Product (Travel) Designer’s focus is to deliver innovative seasonal gear-carrying solutions and special designs, ranging from packs to hard-sided, soft-sided, and hybrid wheeled travel & luggage, and accessories. The Product (Travel) Designer is responsible for delivering all aspects of the design from concept to pre-production via prototyping, testing, sourcing, color/fabric/trims processes, and specification packages (tech-packs).

Read more details about this job 

02 Oxo

Packaging Designer at Oxo

At OXO, we’re on a quest to make every day better. For over 25 years, we’ve made household tools that delight our customers and exceed their expectations. When we have an idea, we’re going to make it happen, even if it hasn’t been done before. As a member of OXO’s Brand Design team, the Packaging Designer is responsible for the conception and design of graphics for all OXO packaging as well as point of purchase, signage and sales collateral. The designer works closely with the Associate Design Director, Copywriters, Photographers, Production Manager and Project Managers.

Read more details about this job 

03 Johnson Matrix

Industrial Designer at Johnson Health Tech North America Inc

MATRIX Fitness North America is seeking a mid-level Industrial Designer with 3-5 years of experience. Wed like you to join our team of dedicated design professionals and help solve problems within the fitness markets. Our preferred candidate will have a varied background have had multiple product successes. As well, they should have a thorough understanding of the product development process.
We work on all aspects of the fitness markets: cardio, strength, and functional fitness. The work is engaging and offers many challenges. Some travel is expected for this position.

Read more details about this job 

05 Dicks Sporting

Industrial Design Lead at Dick’s Sporting Goods

DICK’S Sporting Goods was founded in 1948 when an 18-year-old Dick Stack was working at an Army surplus store in Binghamton, New York.  Under the direction of the Director of Industrial Design, the Lead designer will demonstrate the use of development tools and an understanding of all aspects of the product design process during the development of the assigned projects. They will utilize core design skills, adhere to the timing and action calendar, execute production level information including 3D data, follow through with all steps for execution of the product from concept to post design finalization, increase the number of projects executed with the use of external resources, maximize vendor resources, assist in driving the category assigned from a design perspective, and work with cross-functional team members during all aspects of execution.

Read more details about this job 

04 Microsoft Spark

Packaging Designer at Spark (Design North) at Microsoft

The Packaging Design Department at Microsoft is looking for a dynamic Designer with 0-4 years professional experience in structural package design. The ideal Candidate should have an industrial design background, structural packaging design knowledge and skills are a plus. Candidate must have demonstrated success in driving conceptual ideas from ideation to iteration, presentation to production; we’re looking for a builder, thinker, communicator and expansive creative who obsesses over perfect packaging and every detail involved therein. This Candidate will be working within an exceptional internal Packaging Design Team to deliver structural design solutions for major global product lines such as Xbox, Surface, Microsoft Hardware, Windows and Office.

Read more details about this job 


Check out all the latest design openings on Yanko Design Job Board

Or recruit your ideal candidate by posting a job here!

Five more major trends shaping Product Design

00 title

Last week we walked through the 5 major trends shaping product design. The trends covered there speak of the current positivity wave, with most people looking to live a more wholesome, fulfilled life. In part 2 of this series, Ryan Chen (Director of Design & Innovation Strategy at the Bressler Group) talks about five more points he considers pivotal in shaping up the future of product design.

Looking to hire a talented designer? Post a job with us to source the best talent for your requirement.

Want an amazing internship or job opportunity? Check out YD Job Board to work at some of the best design companies in the world.


02 image

The Five Global Megatrends I wrote about last month touched on a number of fundamental shifts in consumer and social trends, and their implications for design. The picture they painted was of a more pared down, meaning-focused world, where just enough is better than too much, focus is better than distraction, and well-being trumps getting ahead.

But they only paint a partial picture of what the next decade is going to look like — there’s also a lot changing in the way we communicate with each other, our ability to impact the world around us, and our expectations for products and services to understand and adapt to our needs. To get a full understanding of what’s going to change in the next five to ten years, and how brands and organizations need to change in order to stay relevant, you need to go deeper.

These next five megatrends plumb the depths of identity, community, and meaning, revealing some sky-high expectations from consumers, but also an increased willingness to form lasting relationships, especially with communities (and products) that treat us as individuals rather than just wallets or eyeballs.

03 image

6. Radical Personalization

Never before has it been so easy or cheap to personalize products and experiences. Where bespoke and highly targeted offerings were once reserved for the wealthy and sophisticated, such customization is now commonplace, for everything from laptops and athletic shoes to vacations and medical advice.

Part of the appeal is function: a personalized product satisfies your specific needs more completely and efficiently than a one-size-fits-all alternative. But the emotional aspect is perhaps even more important. If you want to build a true connection between consumer and brand, there’s nothing more direct or more certain than giving them something unique, that shows you know them and understand their individuality like no one else does.

What’s driving this trend?

  • Digital services are naturally easier to customize (digital stickers in social media, recommendations based on browsing history, etc.), pushing consumers to expect higher levels of personalization offline as well.
  • Technologies like 3D printing and rapid prototyping make customized products feasible to produce at scale, at far lower cost than in the days when personalized automatically meant made-by-hand.
  • An explosion of available data means the information needed to create a personalized product or service has already been gathered. All the customer needs to do is give permission for it to be accessed.

What does this imply for design?

  • Customization still often comes at a premium, so target niche users who stand to get the most out of it. IKEA’s user-specific 3D-printed chairs, for example, are aimed specifically at the hardcore gamer crowd.
  • Seek personalized offerings that reinforce your brand direction. Nestle’s Wellness Ambassador service does this by using customer-supplied genetic data to make diet and supplement recommendations, in keeping with its pivot in recent years away from sweets & snacks, and toward health-conscious living.
  • Recognize the difference between pragmatic and emotional personalization: it doesn’t always have to provide technical benefits. Candy store Lolli & Pops, for example, uses facial recognition to alert sales associates when VIP customers enter, giving them a list of preferences and allergies so they can make more personalized recommendations.

04 image

7. Search for Authenticity

More abundant, more probing media and the rise of fake-everything means consumers rarely take things at face value anymore. And in an era when anyone can publish content, there’s no reason to rely on the traditional sources for our information. All of this makes it much harder for brands to convince consumers that they’re for real.

“Symmetry of Information” is one of the most promising responses to this skepticism: the idea that customers should know as much about the brand as the brand knows about them. While marketing campaigns are often met with skepticism, a clear window into the workings of the company is hard to dismiss, especially if it comes with a shift in policy, away from misleading images, statements or practices.

What’s driving this trend?

  • A social media and political climate in which traditional sources of reliable truth are increasingly seen as untrustworthy.
  • Cynical corporate practices around environmental responsibility and labor practices are harder to hide, leading to declining faith in once-trusted brands.
  • The rise of small, socially conscious startup brands and citizen media are giving real alternatives to traditional commercial and media channels, and an opportunity for consumers to find new brands that more closely resonate with their own values.

What does this imply for design?

  • Give consumers a little credit — they don’t necessarily need every video, photo and testimonial to be flawless. Suave’s “Hair You Can Believe” campaign and Dove’s “No Digital Distortion” mark, for example, both attract followings among customers tired of unattainable standards of beauty and perfection.
  • Look inside your organization for qualities to celebrate externally. Fashion brand Everlane has built a huge loyalist base (and grown 100% annually for five years now) by exposing every detail of its business, from manufacturing costs to tours of the factories where its clothes are made.
  • Invite real customers to participate in marketing messages. Lush Cosmetics now sources spokespeople from among its “superfan” customers, who make up in enthusiasm and authenticity what they might lack in adherence to traditional norms of photogeneity.

05 image

8. Connection/Disconnection

For decades, technology and telecommunications has worked relentlessly to give us more access, more information, more communication — and now it seems we’re victims of their success. Bandwidth is so cheap and communication channels so abundant today that choosing when and how to be connected has become a treasured capability.

Increasingly, this means services that make connection easier with the right people or information, while providing more fine-grained control over who we interact with, when, and in what context. In some cases, it can also mean disconnecting, as evidenced by the proliferation of “digital detox” vacations and device-free events.

What’s driving this trend?

  • Smartphones, connected devices, ubiquitous WiFi, dozens of messaging and sharing apps, all conspiring to keep us communicating non-stop, whether we like it or not.
  • Increased competition in digital services means one size no longer fits all. Consumers can choose the platforms that make the most sense for their situation and desired communication modes.
  • Greater awareness of the downsides of constant connection. The latest research identifies developmental effects of too much screen time on kids, as well as the emotional burden of being “always on”.
  • Increasing social isolation, as younger generations delay marriage and move more frequently than their parents. This has created a critical mass of digitally-savvy solo consumers, eager for connection but wary of unmoderated interactions.

What does this imply for design?

  • Consider offering alternative versions of existing products and services, to address different styles of browsing and communication. Dating apps are a good example, with a landscape that includes image-first (Tinder), conversation-first (Taffy), women-first (Bumble) and algorithm-driven (Match, OKCupid) approaches — each of which has a loyal audience.
  • Look for new ways to serve solo customers, by connecting them with each other to share costs and experiences in a curated way. Co-working spaces like WeWork and ridesharing apps like UberPool make this effortless and relatively secure.
  • Create services that put a moderation layer between strangers who still need to communicate. Airbnb and eBay have been doing this for years; more recently, apps like MoveCar allow residents of Chinese cities to leave virtual notes for their neighbors, asking them to move vehicles without fear of awkward or dangerous interactions.

06 image

9. Empowered Individual

The line between consumer and producer has been blurring for years, with newly democratized tools for producing and publishing content, and communications platforms that allow entire new movements to spring up practically overnight. For companies this can be a two-edged sword: empowered individuals can be tremendous marketing allies, merciless critics, or even upstart competitors.

Many brands are seizing on this fluidity as a source of ideas and a way to activate their customer communities. It’s still early days though, and a poorly executed customer engagement effort can easily come across as a cynical attempt to exploit authentic social connection for commercial gain.

What’s driving this trend?

  • Social movements are exploding, from #MeToo and grassroots political campaigns to environmental protests and pro-housing YIMBY activism. More than just making noise, they’re affecting real change in the lives of millions — including consumers.
  • User reviews are so credible and so easy to leave that they’ve largely supplanted marketing and professional reviews, for everything from restaurants to taxi rides to people’s homes.
  • Powerful, easy-to-learn tools have transformed a wide range of creative endeavors, making tasks that once took a roomful of seasoned professionals achievable with a laptop or smartphone.
  • Investment and commerce have been democratized too, with crowdfunding and sales platforms designed for broad access, and blockchain promising to remove the need for central controlling authorities in many transactions.

What does this imply for design?

  • Take a page from independent makers and use crowdfunding platforms to try out experimental product ideas. LEGO did this recently, proposing the FORMA line of mechanical kits on IndieGoGo, and using the launch to solicit feedback and build buzz while testing the concept’s appeal with a new audience: adults.
  • Look for opportunities in the peer-to-peer (“sharing”) economy created by new technologies. South Korean ridesharing app TADA, for example, is taking on Uber by using blockchain payment utilities to cut out the middleman, letting drivers earn more per ride.
  • Crowdsource new products and features — carefully. Fashion label Nyden uses Instagram stories to get feedback on new designs, inviting followers to vote on their favorites. This is different, though, from simply asking users to design something for you from scratch, which can appear exploitative, and rarely produces good results.

07 image

10. Consumer Remapped

More granular information about customers and more powerful ways of processing it are giving companies unprecedented insight into who’s using their products and services, and what their interests and needs are. This has the potential to revolutionize market segmentation, making it far more granular, and accurate, while also letting customer service associates know more about who they’re talking to when offering assistance or solving problems.

The results of all this insight can upset accepted wisdom: it turns out that consumers are more likely to fall into a spectrum than a series of buckets. Some skateboarders are girls, some makeup users are men or transgender, and some NBA fans are disabled. In the past these were dismissed as niches too small to address, but with today’s informational and personalization tools, they’re sources for growth — and intense loyalty for the brands that get there first.

What’s driving this trend?

  • Big Data, in all its glory. As consumers travel through their connected lives, they leave a massive trove of information about their interests, habits and social connections.
  • Machine learning and improved processing algorithms are making it easier to draw meaning out of the petabytes of data now available.
  • Multi-culturalism is becoming the norm, with ever more mobile societies, and significant fractions of North American and European kids identifying as multi-racial.
  • Consumer expectations for personalized experiences mean more than just being able to ask for something specific. They want to be known, and to see brands proactively shaping products and services for them, without effort or fuss.

What does this imply for design?

  • Over-reliance on traditional demographic segmentation like age, income level, gender and education is becoming a liability. Conversely, more granular consumer insights can translate directly into new offerings, such as a recent special issue from Vogue, focusing on readers over 60.
  • “Inclusive design” is no longer just to satisfy policy or demonstrate virtue. Properly done, it can also signal to underserved consumer groups that they are valued and welcome, as with Sephora’s makeup classes for transgender customers, or the NBA Store’s efforts to make its NYC location more comfortable for autistic shoppers and those suffering from PTSD or dementia.
  • Use the customization potential in new technologies to show customers what’s uniquely relevant to them. UK fashion retailer ASOS, for example, is using Augmented Reality to let customers view clothes on a variety of body types, going far beyond the typical 5’10” size 2 model.

The original write-up on the Bressler Group blog by Ryan Chen can be found here.

Yanko Design has a long established designer following that you can connect to by publishing your requirement on our network. We know that YD Job Board will connect you to the best designers as they follow the best content published by us. Post a job and get featured on our extensive Social Media network.

08 image

Apple’s latest expansion puts it closer to its biggest rivals

Apple is on track to become the largest private employer in Austin, Texas, after announcing plans to invest $1 billion in a new campus less than a mile away from its existing facilities there. The 133-acre site will initially be home to 5,000 new emp...