Scientists unveil image of quantum entanglement for the first time ever

For the first time ever, physicists have captured an image of quantum entanglement. In a paper published in the journal of Scientific Advances, scientists from the University of Glasglow shared the first known image of a Bell entanglement. The photo...

AI can simulate quantum systems without massive computing power

It's difficult to simulate quantum physics, as the computing demand grows exponentially the more complex the quantum system gets -- even a supercomputer might not be enough. AI might come to the rescue, though. Researchers have developed a computat...

Are you Buying Fitness Wearables From Electronics Companies?


Having spent the week at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), it would appear that fitness & sport tech has started to reach mainstream prominence.  In a way it has, in others...

Alt-week 11.03.12: zombie animals, martian methane and self healing buildings

Alt-week peels back the covers on some of the more curious sci-tech stories from the last seven days.

Altweek 110312 zombie animals, martian methane and self healing buildings

After a week where large numbers of people found themselves at the mercy of mother nature, many will be reminded just how vulnerable we really can be at times. That said, science still provides us with a pretty big stick to whack many other problems with. After the break we look at how crumbling buildings could soon be self-healing, why some UK-based scientists think they are one step closer to answering the "is light made of waves or particles" quandary, and NASA reveals its latest results in the hunt for martian methane. Oh, and there's some zombie animals too. This is alt-week.

Continue reading Alt-week 11.03.12: zombie animals, martian methane and self healing buildings

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Alt-week 11.03.12: zombie animals, martian methane and self healing buildings originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 03 Nov 2012 17:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Flawed diamonds are perfect ingredients for quantum computing, just add time travel

Flawed diamonds are perfect ingredients for quantum computing, just add time travel
Ready to suspend your brain cells in a superposition of disbelief? Good, because the latest news published in Nature is that diamonds are a quantum computer's best friend -- particularly if they're flawed. An international team of scientists sought out sub-atomic impurities in a 1mm-thick fragment of over-priced carbon and used these as qubits to perform successful calculations. A "rogue" nitrogen nucleus provided one qubit, while a free electron became a second. Unlike previous attempts at solid-state quantum computing, this new effort used an extra technique to protect the system from decoherence errors: microwave pulses were fired at the electron qubit to "time-reverse" inconsistencies in its spinning motion. Don't fully get it? Us neither. In any case, it probably won't stop jewellers tut-tutting to themselves.

Flawed diamonds are perfect ingredients for quantum computing, just add time travel originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 07 Apr 2012 06:08:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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