Senators ask the FCC to limit 5G auction to protect weather forecasts

In March, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) began auctioning blocks of the 24 GHz spectrum, which could be used to implement future 5G networks. Shortly afterward, the US Navy released a memo warning that 5G in the 24 GHz band could interfe...

SoftBank’s CEO Wants U.S. Mobile Industry to Follow Japan’s Lead. Um, No Thanks.


SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son is visiting the U.S. this week to tell Washington how the U.S. can learn from Japan’s example to improve its mobile broadband infrastructure. Still smarting from early...

Clear Talk latest beneficiary of Verizon’s 700Mhz spectrum fire sale

Clear Talk latest beneficiary of Verizon's 700Mhz spectrum fire sale

After horse-trading with the FCC and DOJ to gain AWS spectrum from cable venture SpectrumCo in exchange for its 700MHz A and B bands, Verizon has found another taker: Clear Talk, who just signed an agreement to purchase 10 lower B-block licenses. That follows an agreement with Nortex in Texas along with Panhandle Telecom in Oklahoma, and will cover Clear Talk's markets in Maryland, Texas, Georgia, Florida, Nevada and New Mexico. Big Red is evaluating other bids for its lower 700Mhz licenses and is also leasing upper C-block frequencies to 20 operators in order "to jumpstart the delivery of 4G LTE in rural areas." Verizon's tat for that tit will be that it can wholesale its services to cable companies like Comcast and Time Warner, making it well worth the company's while, we can imagine.

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Source: Verizon

Clear Talk latest beneficiary of Verizon’s 700MHz spectrum fire sale

Clear Talk latest beneficiary of Verizon's 700Mhz spectrum fire sale

After horse-trading with the FCC and DOJ to gain AWS spectrum from cable venture SpectrumCo in exchange for its 700MHz A and B bands, Verizon has found another taker: Clear Talk, who just signed an agreement to purchase 10 lower B-block licenses. That follows an agreement with Nortex in Texas along with Panhandle Telecom in Oklahoma, and will cover Clear Talk's markets in Maryland, Texas, Georgia, Florida, Nevada and New Mexico. Big Red is evaluating other bids for its lower 700MHz licenses and is also leasing upper C-block frequencies to 20 operators in order "to jumpstart the delivery of 4G LTE in rural areas." Verizon's tat for that tit will be that it can wholesale its services to cable companies like Comcast and Time Warner, making it well worth the company's while, we can imagine.

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Source: Verizon

FCC votes in favor of rethinking spectrum holding rules, goading broadcasters into wireless selloffs

Cellular tower worker

FCC meetings can be momentous occasions under the right circumstances, although it's seldom the case that we see the agency pass two potentially far-reaching measures in one sitting, like we just saw on Friday. To start, regulators have voted in favor of a proposal that will review spectrum sale rules and might drop the case-by-case determinations in favor of a more consistent screening mechanism. The reexamination will also consider a change to the ownership rules surrounding wireless frequencies that treats bands below 1GHz differently than those above -- the better to address a chorus of smaller carriers that don't like all the prime spectrum going to the companies with the most existing clout, namely AT&T and Verizon. FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski argues that reform could spur innovation through more competition, although dissenting Commissioner Robert McDowell is worried that consistent rules will somehow create "uncertainty."

Side-by-side with the review, the FCC is proposing an incentive-based reverse auction strategy to have TV broadcasters voluntarily give up their spectrum for cellular and data use. The multi-phase approach would have TV providers set the price at which they're willing to sell their spectrum to the FCC; those that just can't bear to part with their airwaves would be corralled into a tighter band range to make for larger available frequency blocks in the auction that follows. As with other FCC proposals, there's likely to be a long interval between the auction vote, the review and any definitive rulemaking, let alone an impact -- auctions by themselves can take years to play out. Still, any success with the measures could head off spectrum crunches while simultaneously preventing any solutions from consolidating too much power and creating their own problems.

[Tower photo via Shutterstock]

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FCC votes in favor of rethinking spectrum holding rules, goading broadcasters into wireless selloffs originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 28 Sep 2012 21:36:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink FierceWireless, Ars Technica  |  sourceFCC (1), (2)  | Email this | Comments

FCC to vote September 28th on proposal auctioning UHF spectrum, Weird Al might still approve

FCC to vote on September 28th on proposal auctioning off UHF spectrum, Weird Al might still approve

The FCC has been more than a little eager to repurpose spectrum as wireless internet access takes off: white spaces and iDEN frequencies have already switched roles, and that's not including the myriad of spectrum swaps. Add one more wireless variety to the list, as FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski has confirmed his agency will vote on a proposal for incentive-based auctions of UHF spectrum. When the Commission meets next on September 28th, it will decide on whether or not to lure broadcasters into giving up the usually TV-focused space for the sake of data lovers everywhere. The freed-up airwaves in the proposal would mostly be unlicensed spectrum with "WiFi-like uses," but at a much lower frequency than the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands that WiFi needs today: as the first consistent, unlicensed spectrum at that range in the US, it could create opportunities for longer-ranged, free wireless that aren't even on the table in 2012. Not that we have much of a choice in taking action today. Any accepted rules won't be completely finalized until mid-2013, and the auction itself won't take place until 2014. Still, the UHF plans foster dreams of more wireless for everyone -- and we suspect that even one Mr. Yankovic wouldn't mind giving up Channel 62 for a long-distance home network.

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FCC to vote September 28th on proposal auctioning UHF spectrum, Weird Al might still approve originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 09 Sep 2012 17:48:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink New York Times  |  sourceFCC  | Email this | Comments

FCC to vote September 28th on proposal auctioning UHF spectrum, Weird Al might still approve

FCC to vote on September 28th on proposal auctioning off UHF spectrum, Weird Al might still approve

The FCC has been more than a little eager to repurpose spectrum as wireless internet access takes off: white spaces and iDEN frequencies have already switched roles, and that's not including the myriad of spectrum swaps. Add one more wireless variety to the list, as FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski has confirmed his agency will vote on a proposal for incentive-based auctions of UHF spectrum. When the Commission meets next on September 28th, it will decide on whether or not to lure broadcasters into giving up the usually TV-focused space for the sake of data lovers everywhere. The freed-up airwaves in the proposal would mostly be unlicensed spectrum with "WiFi-like uses," but at a much lower frequency than the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands that WiFi needs today: as the first consistent, unlicensed spectrum at that range in the US, it could create opportunities for longer-ranged, free wireless that aren't even on the table in 2012. Not that we have much of a choice in taking action today. Any accepted rules won't be completely finalized until mid-2013, and the auction itself won't take place until 2014. Still, the UHF plans foster dreams of more wireless for everyone -- and we suspect that even one Mr. Yankovic wouldn't mind giving up Channel 62 for a long-distance home network.

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FCC to vote September 28th on proposal auctioning UHF spectrum, Weird Al might still approve originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 09 Sep 2012 17:48:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink New York Times  |  sourceFCC  | Email this | Comments

India planning fresh 2G spectrum auctions for November 12th

India planning fresh 2G spectrum auctions for November 12th

India's Department of Telecommunications has issued guidelines for the forthcoming 2G spectrum auction, penciled in for November 12th. While the subcontinent has already flogged off its 3G bands, it withdrew 122 licenses in the 1,800MHz and 800Mhz waves due to allegations of serious corruption. The country has set the starting price of $2.5 billion, a figure that the networks have balked at, saying that it'll cause tariffs to increase -- but is less than half of the $5.61 billion the country had originally sought to raise during the first, scandal-ridden auction.

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India planning fresh 2G spectrum auctions for November 12th originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 28 Aug 2012 02:34:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Wall Street Journal  |  sourceIndia's Department of Telecommunications (PDF)  | Email this | Comments

UK pins the slow move to LTE on carriers, Australia targets auctions for April 2013

Everything Everywhere

Aussies and Brits have been waiting awhile for either a truly broad LTE launch or to get any LTE at all. That wait is coming to an end, but not without some grousing. UK Minister for Culture Ed Vaizey has alleged that any slow movement stemmed from carriers that have "threatened to sue" regulator Ofcom if it's too hasty and does something they frown upon. Needless to say, that remark has ruffled a few feathers: one of the earliest expected British LTE providers, Everything Everywhere, tells Pocket-lint it has "no appetite" to take Ofcom to court and drag 4G deployments through the mud. Things are going a little more smoothly in Australia, if on a later timetable. The Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy, Senator Stephen Conroy, now expects Australia to auction off 700MHz and 2.5GHz wireless frequencies in April 2013. That could lead to a very long wait for wider 4G service in the country, but at least the 700MHz support will be good news for device makers that don't want to be mired in disputes over LTE devices they've brought over from the US.

UK pins the slow move to LTE on carriers, Australia targets auctions for April 2013 originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 21 Jun 2012 03:59:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink The Register  |  sourcePocket-lint, Senator Stephen Conroy  | Email this | Comments