Dozens of law enforcement agencies are helping ICE track cars

More than 9,200 Immigration and Customs Enforcement employees have access to a license plate database that allows authorities to track the movement of vehicles over time. The American Civil Liberties Union says more than 80 law enforcement agencies a...

The Cleo ‘indoor-friendly’ drone flies using a single propeller unit

A crossover between a drone and a donut (I wonder why the word why they missed on the opportunity of calling it a dronut), the Cleo is a drone that’s designed specifically for indoor use. Unlike most drones that require to be flown in an open, empty space, preferably away from obstacles, the Cleo has no such problem. The dronut (I’m just going ahead and using the term) boasts of an indoor-friendly design, featuring a thick, protective outer rim, and a single propeller unit with two propellers spinning in opposite directions. Cleo’s relatively monolithic design fits in a pocket without needing to be disassembled or folded, and there’s nothing externally fragile that you have to protect, like a propeller arm. The Cleo is easy and safe to grip, and can literally be grabbed in mid-air. Its small size also makes it an incredibly portable drone that quite literally fits in most jacket pockets.

Cleo comes with an in-built HD camera, and a battery life of 12-15 minutes, a pretty impressive feat for a drone its size. Made to be used indoors, Cleo definitely has consumer applications, but the designers and developers also see Cleo being used for security, surveillance, and 3D mapping indoors too. Future iterations of Cleo may even feature obstacle avoidance and indoor navigation systems, making it perfect for the security industry.

Designer: Cleo Robotics

UK believes it doesn’t need to ban Huawei from 5G networks

The US may have had some success in persuading allies to ban Huawei equipment from their 5G networks, but not everyone is convinced there's an existential threat. Financial Times sources claim the UK's National Cyber Security Centre has found that i...

Chinese surveillance company found tracking 2.5 million people

Security vulnerabilities are horrible, but one of them is shedding light on the reach of the Chinese surveillance state. Security researcher Victor Gevers discovered that facial recognition firm SenseNets left a surveillance database completely expo...

Hong Kong is testing high-tech monitoring systems for ‘smart’ prisons

Prisons in Hong Kong are testing a variety of high-tech services that will allow correctional facilities to better track inmates, according to the South China Morning Post. The city's Commissioner of Correctional Services, Danny Woo Ying-min, claimed...