LG’s V50 ThinQ 5G is up for pre-order tomorrow from Sprint

Starting tomorrow, customers in select cities can preorder Sprint's first two 5G devices -- the LG V50 ThinQ 5G and HTC 5G Hub. They'll be available in Sprint's first four expected 5G markets -- Atlanta, Dallas, Houston and Kansas City -- by May 31st...

A smart speaker with a detachable display lets you own a tablet + smart speaker!

Nearly one in every four homes in the United States of America has a smart speaker in it. That’s a real statistic, not a guess. I’d say roughly the same amount also own a tablet, like an iPad or a Surface. So why not mash the two products together? Weilin D’s AI Assistant is a combination of a tablet and a smart speaker… and its framework is pretty familiar. In fact, it looks a lot like an Amazon Echo Show, or a Google Home Hub, but with a couple of key differences.

Weilin’s AI Assistant comes as a smart-speaker with a display, but here’s where things get interesting. The display is completely detachable. Designed to be used as a tablet you’d have around the house, the AI Assistant’s detachable display is great for watching content, viewing recipes, checking the time, or having as an ambient, ever-changing photo frame. The display detaches off the dock, which is the smart-speaker. Built with a wireless charger, the dock can juice up the tablet’s battery when idle, and has a far-field microphone that allows you to use the AI Assistant as a smart speaker to command it to play music, answer or reject calls, set reminders, control smart-home products, or order stuff online. Housed within the dock is also a sliding camera that conveniently stays blocked by the tablet. When you’re in the mood for a video conference, the camera slides up and allows you to do video-chats with other people, quite like Facebook’s Portal device, but with a stronger focus on privacy. Once you’re done, the camera slides back into its enclosure.

Designer: Weilin D

The E-ink Kindle-competitor Android should have made a long time ago

A cross between a Kindle, a Wacom, and an Android Tablet, the E-Pad is something that should’ve been launched years back… by Amazon, Samsung, or perhaps even by Adobe. Designed to be a touchscreen tablet with an e-ink display and a stylus, the E-Pad closes the gap between owning a digital device, and a notepad and pencil, and conceptually, that’s a pretty remarkable thing. Here’s why…

Tablets (or even folding phones now) always promised to be one thing. The evolution of laptops and notebooks, downsizing your work productivity to a device you could carry under your arm, rather than in a bulky, elaborately padded laptop bag. However, tablets really failed to deliver on that promise. The Kindle was only a book-reading device, the iPad for the longest time was dragged down by the iOS operating system that wasn’t made for office productivity (and then the iPad Pro turned out to be way too expensive), and Android tablets… well, the less that’s said about them the better. They became the default hardware at coffee-shop kiosks and supermarket-feedback-machines. In short, they just didn’t get the larger picture. At the end of the day everyone went back to keeping actual, physical notebooks they would jot down their plans, ideas, notes into with a real pen. That interaction, which tech promised to displace, never went away to begin with. The E-Pad, however, sets out deliver on the promise and to not make the same mistakes its predecessors did.

The E-Pad is a fusion of two experiences. The comfort of writing with a pen or pencil on paper, with the convenience of a digital tablet. Designed with a touchscreen e-ink display, the E-Pad even packs a stylus that allows you to write on it the way you would on paper, with the output looking stunningly similar to ink on paper too. Flip the stylus over and you’ve got an eraser that erases what you’ve written, completing the experience in every way. At the heart, the E-Pad is an Android-based tablet that lets you use it the way you would a digital device. Built with Android 8.0, the E-Pad lets you do anything an Android tablet would do, and even access and download apps on the Play Store. While the b/w display isn’t particularly made for binge-watching Netflix, you can pretty much do anything you would on an Android device, including browsing the web, checking your mail, sending texts, using Photoshop, and obviously, taking notes and reading books. The E-Pad even comes with Object Character Recognition that converts your handwritten notes into editable text, allowing you to save/edit/send transcripts of your notes. And yes, it can connect to a wireless keyboard for seamless typing too.

The E-Pad packs a pretty remarkable Ultra-HD e-ink display, 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of storage that collectively should blow your Kindle out of the water. With its stylus, sketching on the E-Pad is remarkably similar to doodling on paper, and the absence of perceivable pixels gives you crisp strokes of your pencil, as well as of text, when you’re reading a book, newspaper, or magazine. Finally, conquering the final frontier of tablet design, the E-Pad packs a SIM card slot, giving it 4G connectivity, making it better than A. the Kindle, B. the run-of-the-mill Android Tablet, and C. pen and paper. The E-Pad delivers on the promise of making the tablet useful in the way it intended to be. The tablet promised to be a device for productivity and just ended up becoming a larger version of your phone that didn’t see much use apart from gaming and media-viewing. The E-Pad, on the other hand, does what tablets (or at least some of them) should have done a long time ago.

Designer: Eewriter

Click Here to Buy Now: $474 (E-Pad and Stylus) Only 3 days left!

Click Here to Buy Now: $474 (E-Pad and Stylus) Only 3 days left!

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

It’s been roughly two years since the first time we saw a flexible-screen device (or imagined it) and to be honest, we still haven’t figured out WHY exactly we need one. The only conceivable answer seems to be that mobiles are running into a creative roadblock and flexible phones seem to be the only way out, but differentiation can’t be the only reason to add a bending screen to a gadget, no?

Designer Hyeong Seop Lee seems to have a pretty incredible use for bending displays. The FRAME is a flexible-gadget designed by Lee that uses OLED technology to serve many masters… because the FRAME is capable of being a tablet, a laptop, and even a desktop! With a flexible spine running right along the middle, the FRAME can be carried around folded much like a laptop. Open it out completely and you’ve got yourself a pretty big 15-inch tablet that’s great for multi-tasking, browsing, sketching, and watching movies on. Fold the tablet along its flexible spine and one half of the screen immediately turns into a touchscreen keyboard, giving you the ability to use the FRAME as you would a laptop. In its laptop mode, you can practically angle the display in any way, propping it up vertically just like you would a laptop screen, allowing you to alternate between tablet and laptop whenever you want-need.

When you’re looking for more firepower, the FRAME has the ability of becoming your all-in-1 PC. With a dock that allows it to stand vertically (while also supplying power to it), the FRAME becomes your very own desktop, allowing you to connect keyboards, mice, hard-drives, thumb-drives and even the occasional SD card to it (it even packs an audio jack), giving you all the benefits of a desktop in a gadget that also possesses all the merits of a laptop and tablet. With USB and HDMI ports on its side, along with a card-reader and audio jack, the FRAME is a no-holds-barred tablet. Factor in the flexible OLED display and the FRAME becomes a pretty remarkable laptop. Finally add the dock to the mix and the FRAME easily becomes the most versatile desktop in the world, allowing you to carry your data/work/entertainment with you, and giving you the sheer joy of having three completely different products in one singular design.

This article is also an open-letter to Samsung, which should clearly take some lessons from Lee’s design. Flexible displays are capable of being MUCH more than just a novelty. The FRAME proves it.

Designer: Hyeong Seop Lee

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

The flexible FRAME pad is capable of being a tablet, laptop, AND a desktop

Lenovo Smart Tab review: A hybrid smart display that lives up to the hype

Tablets often go unused, and when you do want to play with it, it's probably dead because you forgot to charge it. At least, that's what happens to me. Lenovo, however, has come up with a potential solution to the neglected tablet dilemma: the Sm...