LEGO Porsche 911 GT3 RS Kit Can Also Build a Lancia Stratos Stradale

One of the coolest cars ever made is the Lancia Stratos Stradale. It was rare and very fast in its day. If you happen to own the awesome LEGO Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS construction kit, there are some new instructions out that will let you build the Lancia with the same kit.

The build requires 2197 parts altogether – about 500 shy of the Porsche. If you want your LEGO Stratos Stradale to work perfectly, you will need a 32187 Technic Driving Ring Extension to enable reverse gear. If you don’t care about reverse gear, you can build the Lancia with only the parts in the kit with five working forward gears.

You can buy the full instructions via Rebrickable for 15 euro (or about $17 USD.) I wonder who the genius was who came up with this build was; they deserve a beer and a round of applause.

[via Hooniverse via Motor1]

Apple worked on biometric unlock for cars

Unlocking your car with a key is so passé. If you've got the right car, you can already use your smartphone as a car key, and Hyundai is slated to release a vehicle that can be unlocked with a fingerprint later this year. Now, it seems that Ap...

Ford Made a Sweaty Robot Butt to Simulate Sweaty Human Butts

If you’ve ever gotten into your car after a big workout or on a really hot day, you and Ford’s latest robot likely have something in common. A sweaty butt. To make sure that your car seat will stand up to such things, Ford engineers in Europe are going all out.

Ford’s Robutt is designed to mimic a sweaty butt. Taint nothing butt another chance to get crackin’ on quality at Ford. Ford uses the butt to test the effectiveness of their car seats over time. It is basically a butt-shaped cushion attached to a Kuka industrial robot arm, which is repeatedly pressed onto the tester seat to recreate 10 years of sweaty wear and tear.

The sweat test takes three days to complete and by the end of it, Robutt sits in the test seat 7,500 times, and even leans from side to side. In case you are wondering, the Robutt has the butt dimensions of a large man, is heated to body temperature, and soaked with 450 milliliters of water.

So there you go. Robots are getting grosser as they strive to copy humans, showing us just how gross WE really are. At least you know that quality is still job one at Ford, and that those seats are built Ford tough.

[via Techly]

Guy Uses RC Toys To Excavate and Expand Basement

Why hire expensive contractors to expand your basement, when you can use RC construction vehicles to do the job? I mean, that’s what I always say. YouTuber LilGiantsConstrCo otherwise known as Joe is an RC hobbyist. He has spent years excavating his basement using nothing but RC construction toys. That’ll stick it to those expensive contractors.

Joe is a grain farmer from southwest Saskatchewan, Canada, and king of toy-based excavation. He started the hobby in 1995 and has amassed a large fleet of construction equipment vehicles. So far he has used the RC truck and excavator to expand his basement by 30 percent, removing around 30 cubic meters (1,059 cubic feet) of dirt. He also used these vehicles to create a walkthrough tunnel that leads from his workshop to the basement of his house too. That’s all pretty impressive. The man has a lot of patience, that’s for sure.

Joe is the co-founder of an RC truck and construction hobbyists forum that is dedicated to the radio controlled heavy commercial hobby. Who knew that these vehicles could actually do the same jobs that their larger scaled counterparts can do? I suppose he could have just grabbed a shovel and had it done in days, but where’s the fun in that?

[via Mike Shouts]

Guy Uses RC Toys To Excavate and Expand Basement

Why hire expensive contractors to expand your basement, when you can use RC construction vehicles to do the job? I mean, that’s what I always say. YouTuber LilGiantsConstrCo otherwise known as Joe is an RC hobbyist. He has spent years excavating his basement using nothing but RC construction toys. That’ll stick it to those expensive contractors.

Joe is a grain farmer from southwest Saskatchewan, Canada, and king of toy-based excavation. He started the hobby in 1995 and has amassed a large fleet of construction equipment vehicles. So far he has used the RC truck and excavator to expand his basement by 30 percent, removing around 30 cubic meters (1,059 cubic feet) of dirt. He also used these vehicles to create a walkthrough tunnel that leads from his workshop to the basement of his house too. That’s all pretty impressive. The man has a lot of patience, that’s for sure.

Joe is the co-founder of an RC truck and construction hobbyists forum that is dedicated to the radio controlled heavy commercial hobby. Who knew that these vehicles could actually do the same jobs that their larger scaled counterparts can do? I suppose he could have just grabbed a shovel and had it done in days, but where’s the fun in that?

[via Mike Shouts]

AutoAuto All-In-One Tool Makes Changing Tires Easy

Changing your car’s tires is a lengthier process than it should be. You need several tools with you, and many people may not have them all handy. That’s why the AutoAuto car tool looks like a more efficient way of doing things. The tool has an all-in-one design that’s supposed to make changing tires faster.

This all-in-one gadget can loosen the lug nuts, crank up your jack, and air up your tire once mounted. It features an automated design for those of us who aren’t used to doing the job. It can be easily used by even the most inexperienced mechanic, without having to head to the shop and be charged way too much.

It is also compact enough to be stored anywhere. Changing a tire has never been easier. This tool will certainly shave some time off the process and allow those who aren’t so good at it to do it more easily. The AutoAuto car tool starts at about $299, and is currently raising production funds over on Kickstarter. If it does everything it’s supposed to as efficiently as claimed, it could be worth the asking price.

[via Geeky Gadgets]

Chevy Finds New Brick Roads with a Full-size LEGO Silverado Truck

It’s awesome to see people build big things with LEGO bricks. Chevrolet teamed up with students from the Oxford Community School’s First LEGO League, and Detroit’s Ralph Waldo Emerson Elementary’s A World in Motion Program to unveil a full-size replica of the Silverado truck made entirely of LEGO bricks.

Specifically, the brick-built creation is a reproduction of the 2019 Silverado 1500 LT Trail Boss. The truck was built by 18 LEGO Master Builders and took over 2,000 hours of work to select and place each brick. A total of 334,544 pieces were used to make the truck, which has working headlights. In total, the model weighs in at a whopping 3,307 pounds, which is still roughly 1,800 pounds less than an actual Silverado 1500 Trail Boss.

The LEGO truck was built in partnership between Chevy and Warner Bros. to celebrate “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part”, The film will hit theaters on February 8. If you happen to stop by the North American International Auto Show between now and January 27, you can catch a glimpse of the LEGO Silverado in person.

Hyundai Shows off Walking Car Concept for Extreme Terrain

Innovation and CES used to go hand in hand, but in recent years, most of the tech on display is evolutionary, rather than revolutionary. Kudos to Hyundai and its CRADLE division for showing up at the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show with a truly innovative and unusual concept that’s well outside of the boundaries of conventional thinking. Sure, the Elevate appears only in renderings at this point, but the IDEA of a vehicle that can walk is truly off the beaten path.

So why would you want a car that could walk? Well if you’re in the business of rescuing people in rugged terrain, or in the rubble of a collapsed structure, even the most rugged of Jeeps can have problems negotiating extremely jagged and uneven surfaces. In the case of Hyundai’s concept vehicle, its legs allow it to maneuver over just about any surface you can throw at it.

At the end of each of its legs is a wheel, so it’s able to use its variable height legs to position itself and then the wheels to propel it in any direction. The video clip below offers a brief glimpse at how the mechanism would work:

In addition to dealing with rugged off-road terrain, Hyundai showed off an urban scenario for the Elevate as well – using its height-adjustable legs to pick up and deliver people at the top of a staircase – which could improve mobility and access to locations without ramps for people with disabilities.

Technically, the Elevate is designed to run on a purely-electric drivetrain, and its legs are able to not only extend in height, but in width – up to a whopping 15-foot track width. This can improve vehicle stability, and gives it the potential to just ride over a tall obstacle under the center of the vehicle.

While Hyundai isn’t planning on producing the Elevate at this point, I’m hopeful that some of its concepts do find their way into search and rescue vehicles in the not-too-distant future.

[via Autocar]

LEGO Technic Corvette ZR-1 Doubles as a Hot Rod

We like our LEGO around these parts. Usually, when we are talking about a LEGO Technic car kit, we are talking about an insanely complex and expensive bag of parts. The $350, 3599-piece Bugatti Veyron kit is an excellent example of how extravagant LEGO car kits can be.

Good news for LEGO car fans who don’t have the budget or time for Bugattis. The LEGO Technic kit 42093 is of an American supercar, the Corvette ZR-1, and like the real deal, it’s a fraction of the cost and complexity of a Veyron. Priced at just $49.99, this 579-piece kit is much cheaper and is easier to build.

The car has lots of neat details, including a big wing out back, quad exhaust pipes, black-spoked rims, a working steering wheel, and a V8 engine with pistons that move. The finished model measures 3″ high, 4″ wide, and 11″ long.

The ZR-1 kit also comes with a set of instructions that allow you to build a classic Hot Rod with the same parts. Best of all, it’s available right now from the LEGO Shop.

[via The Drive]