Cognixion’s newest wearable is a brain-computer interface that uses AR to convert thought into speech!

Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) are essentially communication devices that acquire brain signals to then translate into electrical signals, which are ultimately used to control a device’s operating and navigation system. BCIs were initially developed as assistive devices used to aid people with complex communication disorders such as ALS, muscular dystrophy, and Cerebral Palsy. Since their conception, BCIs have grown with the time’s technological advancements, coming equipped with features such as augmented-reality and robot control. Today, Cognixion ONE, a wearable speech-generating device with AR, is the latest BCI innovation and the first of its kind.

Conixion ONE works simply by strapping the headset on and letting the AR interface guide its user through communication processes. Six non-invasive electrodes manage brain communication by determining where the signals are coming from within the brain and translate its signals into electrical signals that guide users through features like a context-aware predictive keyboard, radial sentence builder tools, an integrated AI assistant, and data streaming. The headset’s dual-display allows users to ask or answer questions, with their responses then getting broadcasted on the display’s front-facing screen. The headset’s AR environment registers signals coming from head movement, voice commands, BCI, and switch controls. Cognixion ONE also comes enabled with 4G LTE to allow for full functionality even on the go and equipped with a USB-C charging port.

The makers behind Cognixion ONE designed the BCI out of necessity– there’s not another BCI on the market that enjoys its many features. Developed by a team of neurologists, biosignal engineers, Speech-Language Pathologists, special educators, as well as individuals who actually use AAC/AT tools in everyday life, Cognixion ONE evolved into the world’s first BCI to use AR to translate thought into speech. With such a well-endowed team of innovators, Cognixion ONE is able to offer speech and an integrated AI assistant for home automation control.

Designer: Cognixion

Cognixion ONE is completely wireless and comes equipped with 4G LTE for use on-the-go!

Cognixion ONE’s headset forms to the person wearing it, adapting to any brain and head shape and size.

Cognixion ONE’s headset registers signal from head pointing, BCI, or switch controls.

With added padding, the makers behind Cognixion ONE ensured that when wearing the headset, the user remains comfortable.

Through AR capabilities, Cognixion ONE guides users through display screens that help generate thought into speech.

Oakley finally designed a spectacle-friendly N95 mask that prevents your glasses from fogging up

It’s obviously in Oakley’s best interests to make face-masks that accommodate spectacles! Considering that more than 75% of the human adult population wears spectacles, and that fogged glasses can be such a deterring factor when it comes to masks, the opportunity to make a spectacles-friendly mask has been around for quite some time. As a pioneer in the eyewear (and sportswear) industry, Oakley was perfectly positioned to tackle this problem head-on, and I’m sort of surprised they didn’t launch this sooner! Meet the MSK3, a face-mask with replaceable N95 filters, and a dedicated eyewear channel along the nose that lets you comfortably wear spectacles without them fogging up.

The Oakley MSK3 is a clever solution to a largely ignored problem. The mask comes with a mesh front that looks stylish and basically gives you the feeling of breathability, while a high-performance, disposable filter sits behind it, giving you over 95% filtration efficiency of particles down to the size of 0.3 microns. Adjustable straps allow you to calibrate the mask to the size of your face, while the MSK3’s most innovative feature, the redesigned nose-bridge, ensures a perfect seal around the nasal area. The silicone nose-bridge also has a dedicated eyewear channel – a thin strip that lets you perfectly wear your specs over your mask, sealing the nasal area. This seal ensures that A. your spectacles don’t slip off while running or jogging, and B. exhaled air doesn’t leak from the area around your nose, fogging your glasses. The result is a mask that’s impeccably designed to solve the one MAJOR problem nobody thought of solving… and sure, you can look at the product from Oakley’s obvious profit angle, but then again, if it means a better, safer, and more comfortable mask-wearing experience for me and 75% of all adults, I guess that’s a pretty remarkable achievement too!

Designer: Oakley

Medical innovations that are boosting and transforming modern healthcare!

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought to us one overwhelming realization – how fragile life is. It has truly backed up something we heard all our lives, but never took quite literally, ‘Health is Wealth’. Though the vaccine is slowly finding its way in the world, the cases are still ongoing, and they’ve created tremendous pressure on the medical industry. However, designers all over the world are coming to the rescue! Medical innovations are booming. Designers have been coming up with new and improved, innovative, and life-saving medical designs that not only boost medical care but relieve some of the pressure from our tireless medical force. From a stethoscope that detects the early signs of arthrosis to an ambulance that tactfully avoids traffic, these designs tackle a variety of problems in the health and medical field. They’re a boon to modern healthcare and a reminder that we cannot take our health for granted any longer!

Literally, the size of a quarter, Adam Miklosi’s Dab is an unobtrusive Holter ECG/EKG that rests comfortably on your chest, constantly reading your heart’s movements. Designed to be minimal, non-invasive, and simple, the Dab tries to bridge the gap between medical appliances and wearables. Its tiny yet classy design sits on your chest via a gel patch, while the electrodes capture your heart activity. The Dab’s dry-electrodes allow it to be used and reused, while constantly measure one’s heart activity (requiring periodic charging via their wireless charging hub), and keep logs of accurate readings, quietly sitting on your chest while you absolutely forget that they’re even there in the first place!

This clever design safely transports spillable food for those with Parkinson’s disease. Designed by Jonas Krämer and Ayla Warncke, the Foodsling facilitates the transport of spillable foods for everyone but it was specially designed keeping in mind people who have to live with Parkinson’s disease. Due to the weakness of their musculoskeletal system, they often face mobility issues and need assistance with simple tasks like carrying their food bowls. The Foodsling is created for individual use so that it can be kept lightweight and small for the user’s ease. The designers are using soft silicone to make the final product and that will also incorporate transporting smaller vessels, the prototype already has an adjustable diameter. The Foodsling can be carried with one hand, enabling the user to hold a walking aid in the other hand. The designers carried out tests with people who suffer from Parkinson’s disease and while the design works for most of them, each person’s intensity and experience with the disease is different so we must remember that this is not one size fits all but it will be one size that fits all bowls!

The Auvis is a digital stethoscope that is structured to detect early signs of arthrosis. The instrument has built-in sensors to catch sounds emitted by joints, making it easier to pick up degenerating cartilage inside them. The arthrosis that this digital stethoscope intends to detect is a non-inflammatory degenerative condition that’s mainly associated with aging. It occurs as a person grows older and the joint cartilage becomes rugged and begins to wear out. Since, the designer says, “cartilage degeneration, the starting point of arthrosis, can neither be seen on X-Ray nor MRT,” the Auvis presents itself as a viable med gadget. Degenerating cartilage tends to generate sounds that the sensors on the Auvis can pick up to let a physician interpret the feedback and give the diagnosis. Like an ordinary stethoscope, Auvis also comprises an examining tool and a neckpiece – the only difference being, these are wirelessly connected and offer an unrestricted opportunity to examine various joints on the body.

The California Institute of Technology is working on an electronic skin, a sensor-filled sticker, that can turn human sweat into energy enough to power basic devices like heart-rate sensors, glucose-level trackers, or even a low-energy Bluetooth radio. These stickers work by harvesting ‘lactate’ from the sweat we produce. The lactate is absorbed by the electronic skin’s fuel cells – which are made from carbon nanotubes that host a platinum/cobalt catalyst and an enzyme that uses oxygen in the air to break down the lactate into water and a substance called pyruvate. CalTech’s researchers say these stickers can generate a continuous stream of energy (as much as “several milliwatts per square centimeter”), making it enough to offset the need for a battery, which the technology hopes to eventually replace.

Hearings aids have always made the user feel conscious and many will try to hide the fact that they are wearing one. The device that is meant to empower them and help with their hearing is actually doing the opposite by making them feel like they have something to be embarrassed about. Alice Turner decided to design Amplify, a hearing device that was made to be seen, to feel confident about, and to help people experience life to its full potential! Amplify was created to give the hearing-impaired demographic an added value that made the hearing aid more than just a medical accessory. “In the ’60s, glasses were aids for a disability. Now, glasses have evolved into ‘eyewear’, a fashion statement, and an extension of your personality. This shift made me question why the main innovation in hearing aid design is developing technology to make them smaller and more hidden,” says the designer on her thought process behind starting the project. Using bone conduction technology, Amplify provides users with high-quality audio for a more comfortable and wholesome sound experience. This technology enables the device to decode sound waves and convert them into vibrations that can be received directly by the Cochlea so the eardrum is never involved. Amplify essentially becomes your eardrum!

How does an ambulance reach a victim in a road/highway accident when there are more than a dozen cars stuck in a traffic jam between the ambulance and the site of the accident? Up until now, the only solution was to drive in the opposite lane, weaving through oncoming traffic to get to the victim. A band of Korean designers created the Median AMB, a special ambulance that can directly reach the point of the accident without getting affected by the traffic congestion created by the accident. The Median AMB sits on the road divider/median and drives up and down the highway almost like a monorail. It features sliding doors on both sides, seating for a driver and an assistant, and an area for a stretcher that holds the victim. The Median AMB drives down the dividers, right to the victim’s location, picks them up, and brings them to a proper ambulance that can take the victim to the nearest hospital.

While the world’s scrambling to deal with the sudden explosion of the COVID-19 virus, it’s pretty refreshing to see that certain startups are pushing the boundaries when it comes to lending a helping hand in any way possible. Health startup Oura, the creator behind the 2018 Red Dot-winning Oura Ring, is teaming up with the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) to see if the physiological data picked up by the ring combined with responses to daily symptom surveys, can predict symptoms of the illness. “The study aims to build an algorithm to help UCSF identify patterns of onset, progression, and recovery, for COVID-19”, says the team at Oura. The ‘Oura TemPredict’ study will be split into two groups, where Oura will test data collected by front-line health professionals, and data gathered by the general public. The startup plans to supply more than 2,000 healthcare workers (who are in daily contact with patients who may be afflicted with COVID-19 at UCSF campuses) with Oura rings to monitor changes in their body temperature, respiratory rate, and heart rate. Daily Symptom Surveys will be made available to all Oura Ring users too, allowing participants to send their crucial data to UCSF’s team of researchers to help them identify patterns that could predict onset, progression, and recovery in any future cases of COVID-19.

Across the globe in 2018, 2.5 million babies died within their first month of life. Collectively, Africa and Southern Asia made up approximately 87.7% of these deaths. – UNICEF. To address this issue, designers Chris Barnes and others at Cambridge Consultants of Cambridge, UK have designed a wearable health monitor for newborns in areas where current solutions are not easily available. Called ‘Little I’, their innovation empowers parents in low resource countries to monitor the health of their newborns by providing a low-cost, durable device that gives them assurance of their newborn’s survival despite lack of medical knowledge. This service is implemented by NGOs first buying and transporting the device to the community and teaching the workers how to use it. And in parallel, the mother/caregiver would hear about the device within the community and then later be provided one by a health care professional after giving birth. After 28 days, the device is returned which is then cleaned and recharged to be used by another newborn.

These ICU pods are called CURA (Connected Units for Respiratory Ailments) which means “cure” in Latin (doesn’t that make you feel a little better?) and these will help take some load off the hospitals, especially in Italy. Ratti’s Studio, Carlo Ratti Associati, and MIT’s Senseable City Lab are creating mobile field hospitals with these CURA Intensive Care pods that serve as a biocontainment unit for two patients at a time. “The aim is that they can be quickly deployed in cities around the world, promptly responding to the shortage of ICU space in hospitals and the spread of the disease,” explained the CURA team as they build the first prototype unit at a hospital in Milan. These units can be set up as fast as tents with the benefit of having hospital-level hygiene which will help contain the infection and especially help those suffering from acute respiratory problems as they need intense care. This will also ensure that the health professionals remain safe while treating the infected who will have a better chance at recovery in the biocontainment units.

Omamori (お守り) are traditional good luck charms in Japanese culture that protect the wearer of the charm. The concept of Kenkō is a futuristic take on the traditional Omamori, it does not cure illnesses or ward off evil spirits but it helps you stay healthy by being in sync with the earth’s electromagnetic frequencies. The earth is constantly emitting 7,83 Hz (also known as the earth’s breath, who knew that?!) along its surface which is believed to allow living beings to regulate their physiological functions. Scientific studies show that the earth’s natural magnetic fields have a positive influence on our brains. With the rapid development of electronic communication technologies, our bodies are getting confused between the natural and artificial frequencies which are dwindling our inherent ability to be in sync with nature. This concept device is aimed at increasing focus, coordinated neural activities, improve sleep and circadian rhythms, stabilize blood pressure and stimulate osteoblasts. Kenkō will be created to produce a 7,83Hz signal, reproducing the natural frequency using technology which will help human bodies re-establish their intrinsic relationship with being healthy naturally. It will have an LED light strip that glows when you switch on the device. Electrosmog caused by Wi-Fi and smartphone frequencies can no longer disturb the sync between the natural rhythm and your brain with Kenkō’s 1.5m protection radius around you.

Circular saw blades replace the tires of this classic road bike to help it ride on ice!

Across the globe, it seems a cold front has a lot of us in its grips and cooped up indoors. No longer are we riding bikes in the sun or enjoying the outdoors, instead, we’re suffering through the double whammy of a cold winter and this endless quarantine. But for some of us, the frozen lake left in the wake of a winter storm’s rage only coaxes us from hibernation, offering more territory for us to play. For The Q, a video-content creation channel known for its quirky science videos that solve engineering problems, a frozen lake provided the ideal conditions to test out their latest project, Icyclycle  – a road bike whose tires were replaced with giant, circular saw blades.

In order to get their bike, a Corso Number One Spirit, primed for the ice, The Q entirely disassembled the bike’s 26-inch wheel systems. The tires were deflated, the spokes were removed, and the cog was soldered. The road bike’s rear cassette was first broken down into its individual components in order to then be welded and fitted for the incoming circular saw blades. Placing the round saw blades between the bike’s rear chainstays, the bike’s original chains accommodated the new saw-tires with help from a welded disc wheel. As shown in the video, once the new circular saw blades were put in place and ready to hit the ice, The Q’s initial test run didn’t go as planned.

The bike moved too deep along the y-axis, digging deeper into the ice instead of moving forward. Noticing this mechanical issue, The Q returned to the metal shop for some acute fixes that required welding small horizontal metal fixtures to the ends of each tooth around the circular saw-blade-tires. The smart fix eventually led to the success of Icyclycle since it allowed the saw-blade to simultaneously pick up and collect the ice it moved on, allowing for less force to be applied to the ground as the bike moved forward.

Quarantine is turning a lot of us into self-proclaimed DIY-buffs and this winter isn’t helping, but The Q is in a league of its own. I’d go so far as to say that when it comes to surviving this winter, The Q came, saw, and conquered.

Designer: The Q

Replacing the road bike’s tires with circular saw blades, The Q set out to create a hybrid bike that runs on ice.

Deconstructing the road bike’s original wheel system meant completely disassembling the rear wheel cassette.

The spokes were removed from both of the wheel’s hubs so that they could be adjusted to accommodate the bike’s new ice-wheels.

The disc wheel worked to help fasten and protect the steel saw blades while also providing positive friction for the bike wheels to properly rotate.

Once the road bike’s hubs were fit for the saw-blades, the new ice-wheels were easily inserted between the bike’s chainstays.

Without any means to move past the ice, the circular saw-blades’ teeth only dug further into the ice as the bike’s wheels rotated.

The design behind this wheel turns it into a type of track wheel that is commonly seen on construction sites or during the early morning hours following a bad snowstorm, as track wheels make it harder for vehicles to sink into the ground.

This modular furniture system was designed to provide privacy and organization for co-living spaces!

Humans are creatures of habit, so they say. We each have our own special ways of finding comfort and peace of mind. More often than not, that sense of comfort is exhibited most obviously in the spaces where we live. We know our homes better than anyone else because we design them ourselves and simply know what we like. Each of us feels the need to design and organize our spaces, and considering our differences in design preferences and modes of organization, we have that in common. Building a household room divider that lends itself to that common need, designers Giulia Pesce and Ruggero Batista created Patchwork.

Patchwork is Giulia and Ruggero’s proposed creative design solution for depersonalized home spaces such as reception centers for unhoused individuals. Their home organization project offers a wide range of functionality in regards to privacy, space demarcation, personalization, and organization of personal belongings. In collaboration with design agency Hans Thyge & Co., Giulia and Ruggero’s Patchwork is meant for use in cohabitation spaces like hostels, school dormitories, or reception centers for unhoused populations.

Patchwork is comprised of different, interchangeable panels that fold and expand like a traditional room divider. Patchwork panels provide plenty of different uses for each individual and function as a typical divider, work station, headboard, or some combination from the above. Patchwork incorporates a built-in closet space where users can hang their clothes and, thanks to a concealed padlock accessory, can also stow away personal possessions for secure storage. Patchwork also comes with supplemental shelving units, individual mirrors, and handy hooks so that the additional panels can be outfitted according to each user’s unique needs.

In order to create an effective solution that offers privacy and the chance to personalize any space one might call home, Giulia and Ruggero committed to field research that took place in a wide array of co-living spaces. Following their visits to unhoused population centers and refugee camps, the designers say, “During field studies in reception centers for homeless people and refugees in Italy, we observed as the facilities used often do not provide the possibility to organize and hang clothes in a functional way.” Upon discovering this deficiency, Giulia and Ruggero created Patchwork, their micro-solution for our shared need to find privacy and individualization no matter where we might find ourselves living.

Designers: Giulia Pesce & Ruggero Batista

Through the use of modular panels, designers Giulia and Ruggero were able to create room dividers for co-living spaces that also function as storage units for personal belongings.

The nondescript padlock offers both security and peace of mind for users who hope to stow away their more prized personal possessions.

Different forms of hooks and shelving units can be added to each Patchwork unit so that users can design their spaces according to their unique needs.

“The different panels are interchangeable and they can be accessorized so as to create different personal units in the shared cohabitation space.”

This NFC enabled sleep aid device keeps you away from late-night scrolling and improves sleep!

Sleep is personal. Each night, we curate the best conditions for optimal sleep. You might have a preferred meditation app, a favorite essential oil for your trusted aromatherapy diffuser, or the only sleep apnea breathing mask that won’t make you feel like you’re going into combat come morning. Whatever your ideal sleeping conditions call for, we all know how important it is to set the tone for a good night’s rest. Mark Stanisic recently debuted his design, Oblak in order to provide a sleeping bedside device that helps manage nightly routines and promote effective rest.

Oblak is essentially a smart speaker that walks users through their nightly sleep routines. Through the use of smart technology, Oblak introduces each individual user’s optimal bedtime environment ideal for effective rest. Many factors can contribute to sleep deprivation, but in today’s world, the overconsumption of media on our smartphones is perhaps the leading cause. In order to step away from smart technology doing the work for us, Stanisic takes a holistic approach instead, encouraging users through Oblak to make conscious decisions that benefit their sleep patterns. For instance, Oblak uses NFC technology to register when its user is ready for bed.

In order for Oblak to operate, the user simply places their smartphone on the induction charging zone, then through connectivity pairing, an accompanying app will ask if they’re ready for bed. Once ‘Yes’ is selected, NFC technology communicates with the bedroom’s additional smart technology such as lightbulbs and thermostats to transform the bedroom into the ideal environment for good sleep. Stanisic found that optimal sleeping conditions require a room’s average temperature to be set between 18-28℃, that the lighting should emanate warm, red wavelengths, and that ambient sound should provide a low-decibel and stable range of sound to cut through distracting outside noises.

All of these conditions work to provide the ideal environment for effective sleep and once a user tells Oblak that they’re ready for bed, the sleeping bedside device maintains the conditions throughout the night so users can sleep soundly. Lights fade from cool blue to warmer red hues, the thermostat adjusts to find the most suitable temperature, and ambient soundwaves permeate the user’s room, creating a sort of sound bath to get some rest.

Designer: Mark Stanisic

Once Oblak’s user is ready for bed, smart technology adjusts the bedroom’s lighting to provide the ideal environment for a good night’s sleep.

Today’s younger generation spends a lot of time looking at their laptop’s or smartphone’s digital screen, which negatively affects our relationship with sleep.

Oblak’s simple interface and textured surface invite users to power on the sleep aid device and securely place their belongings when ready for bed.

Oblak’s friendly appearance prioritizes the user’s peace of mind by utilizing inviting fabric and layers of translucent surfaces that echo the fogginess that follows a good night’s rest.

These foldable bathrooms can be instantly assembled at refugee camps

Designed to be set up at refugee camps in a matter of mere minutes, these bathrooms can be unfolded in a matter of minutes, giving large groups of people a private place to have a shower every day.

The Speedy Collapsible Bathrooms aren’t really replacements for ‘Portaloos’, but are an addition to them, as they provide private showering quarters for refugees. These showering stations come as a single foldable clapboard that can easily be unfolded on-site, with details like floor panels, doors, plumbing, and other attachments being plugged in within mere minutes. Once the clapboard is assembled, the shower-head (which flat-packs too) can easily be assembled along with a foot-powered pump at its base. The final step involves mounting the door units and the elevated floorboards which allow the water to drain from underneath. Water for showering can be pumped through an inlet on the side, although if the water pressure ever drops, a foot-pump in each showering booth lets people easily pump their own water as they bathe.

The Speedy Collapsible Bathrooms are designed to be easy to assemble and effective, but also easy to pack up once done. When the refugee camp is no longer needed, the bathroom can be unplugged and repackaged once again, allowing as many as 10 showering booths to fold up and occupy a fraction of the space on the back of a cargo truck.

The Speedy Collapsible Bathrooms are a winner of the Golden Pin Design Award for the year 2020.

Designer: Ze-Hong Mo

These ergonomic glasses were designed specifically for Black People’s wider nose profiles

It’s weird to think that a design as basic and universal as spectacles or sunglasses can have a racial bias. The truth, however, is that like almost every product you see, spectacles often are designed for the default human, which is, in most cases, a caucasian male or female. Spectacle brand Reframd is correcting that racial bias by designing spectacles specifically for the facial profiles of Black people. The eyewear takes into account the placement and shape of the nose in relation to the eyes – features that distinctly set all races apart.

Most black people have much wider noses, causing spectacles to either pinch the nose-bridges or sit at a slightly higher level, resulting in distorted vision. “At some point, I realized the problem wasn’t with me or my face, but with the product itself,” says Ackeem Ngwenya, product designer and founder of Reframd. “It became clear that the product was not made for people like me, and that I could do something to change that.” The company was founded a mere 5 years ago, although Ngwenya says it’s rooted in years’ worth of “personal frustrations” and an “unwillingness to just accept the world as it is”.

Reframd’s range of spectacles feature a wider nose-bridge, and smaller lens-rings spaced further apart. Reframd works by using a parametric algorithm that runs in a 3D program. Put simply, customers use the front-facing camera on their smartphones to capture their “face landmarks”, reports DesignWeek “Essentially, it’s a pair of glasses that adapt in response to different inputs such as head width, bridge height, pantoscopic tilt, temple length, and more,” says Ngwenya. “These parameters drive frame creation for a particular person and that frame is then sent to our production partner and made for the customer.” This allows each frame to be custom-made for its wearer, ensuring a more personally-suited pair of spectacles that prioritize comfort and break the racial bias around the notion that a product can simply be made to ‘universally’ serve everyone, including people that weren’t considered during its design process.

Designer: Reframd

These air-ventilated and soundproof modular meeting room are here to improve those laggy Zoom meetings!

Work meetings during the age of COVID-19 have changed. Despite all of the memes about sitting in a meeting that could have been an email, the acute need for collaborative workspaces remains. The value of in-person collaboration has become that much more obvious with the onset of stay-and-work from home orders and teams of designers across the globe have issued solutions that both address and transcend the immediate needs brought on by the pandemic. The creatives at Room, a design firm dedicated to rethinking the modern workplace, developed their own solution for the changing needs of the modern workplace with their latest modular meeting room design.

ROOM’s Meeting Room is a soundproof and air-ventilated external collaborative pod that can be placed almost anywhere in order to provide a meeting space that works for business meetings or presentations that require privacy. Silent fans located in The Meeting Room’s roof provide silent air-ventilation to keep the air fresh and moving for longer work meetings. Built as a prefabricated office pod, The Meeting Room comes equipped with all the office essentials such as a whiteboard, round table, integrated powerbox for charging, and even storage units like shelves and wooden boxes. The Meeting Room can be placed in any setting from preexisting office spaces to crowded spacious coffeeshops and it requires no construction for assembly. Just like those old phone booths, The Meeting Room provides a soundproof space with 27 decibels of outside noise reduction so that it can operate as a private working space or conference room for confidential matters. The Meeting Room’s powerbox comes complete with 3 AC outlets, two USB-A ports, one USB-C port, two CAT6 data ports, 1 HDMI port, and a camera connection for its Jabra’s 180-degree PanaCast. Additionally, the external pod’s lighting can be adjusted for dimming or brightening to fit different types of collaboration such as presentations or brainstorming.

In-person collaboration cannot be replaced by technological developments or virtual workdays, but while some try and figure out the ways by which it can be, adaptive workplace designs like the modular Meeting Room from ROOM offer a physical means for collaboration in the meantime. Outfitted to be a microcosm of the office buildings we’ve grown accustomed to, The Meeting Room delivers the conveniences that come with them and promotes both the economic sensibility and sustainability that comes with thinking modular.

Designer: ROOM

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Unveiled at CES 2021, the world’s first robot dog with decentralized AI does everything but walk on water!

Robot dogs have come a long way since Sega Toys’ Poo-Chi hit the scene. I still remember the day I got my Poo-Chi, whose digital bark soon turned into what sounded like a chain-smoking robot’s panic signal. Since its debut in 2000, Poo-Chi, along with many other robotic dog products have seen some major modifications and upgrades. Today, the world’s first decentralized AI robotic dog has been unveiled at CES 2021 by KODA Inc. Designed to offer both emotional companionship and practical, physical support, KODA, Inc.’s DAI robotic dog “is the perfect combination of function and performance,” as CEO of KODA, Inc., Emma Russell puts it.

Unlike the Poo-Chi, who couldn’t even hold its note singing “Ode to Joy,” KODA, Inc.’s robotic dog comes with four 3-D cameras, a single 13-megapixel front-facing camera, an ergonomic structure that incorporates realistic dog-like features such as a purely aesthetic tail, 14 high-torque motors with two on the neck offering full-range mobility for activities like climbing the stairs or trudging through snow, along with an 11 Teraflop processing unit. Since KODA, Inc. is dedicated to providing technology-based solutions to help people with everyday problems, either chronic or otherwise, the secure blockchain network of KODA robot-dogs is closely monitored and cross-checked for consistent and effective AI improvements. For instance, a KODA, Inc. robot-dog in Detroit might be the first to slip on a patch of ice, but thanks to a “futureproof,” supercomputing network, robot-dogs who find their home in a warmer climate will know not to slip on a patch of ice even if the dog’s home ground temperature might never call for one.

The development of decentralized artificial intelligence is integral to the success of robot-operated emotional and physical support products. Decentralized AI essentially equips the built-in software with the ability to solve the reasoning, planning, learning, and decision-making problems that centralized artificial intelligence does not compute. By endowing the robotic dog with Decentralized AI technological capabilities, KODA, Inc. provides a robotic, smart companion that can offer care and guidance for several different purposes including but not limited to, simple companionship, walking guidance for blind users, protective services as a tech-savvy guard dog, or KODA, Inc.’s robotic dog can operate as an animalistic personal assistant capable of solving ordinarily complex issues.

Designer: KODA, Inc.