Wearable health monitoring gets stylish with these rings that can potentially watch your glucose

If smartwatches and fitness bands aren’t your thing, then something more discreet like this smart ring could still keep you on top of your health.

Although fitness trackers have been around for years, recent events have caused a surge not only in interest but also in sales. The arrival of smartwatches also made it easier for people to keep tabs on their bodies, and the Apple Watch’s plethora of health monitoring features have become the gold standard for these wearables. Not everyone, however, is willing to part with their favorite timepiece, and wearing a rugged-looking fitness band might clash with their preferred fashion style. Fortunately, there are companies already putting a ring on health, and Movano might have the most stylish one to rule them all.

Designer: Movano

Admittedly, there aren’t that many players in this smart ring market, at least the ones that are intended to keep track of health rather than giving wearers some techno-magical powers to control devices. The most notable of this bunch is perhaps Oura, but its style and size definitely don’t appeal to everyone. That’s where the Movano Ring comes in, offering an alternative that specifically caters to women that prefer something less conspicuous and even fashionable.

It’s easy to mistake the Movano Ring as a fashion accessory rather than a health tracker, coming in Gold, Silver, Copper, and Black colors. The open-loop or twisted design gives it more personality while also ensuring that it can adjust to any finger size. More importantly, you won’t see the bare electronics underneath, unlike on the Oura, at least if product renders are to be believed.

 

Movano’s wearable isn’t just a pretty face, though, and it promises the staple features you’d find on larger wearables. That includes measuring heart rate and heart rate variability, sleep, respiration, temperature, blood oxygen levels, steps, and calories. It correlates this data and transforms them into information and advice that most people will be able to understand, rather than having to rely on charts and graphs to try and make sense of all the figures.

The one thing holding back the Movano Ring is its availability, which might not happen until later this year. That does give it enough time to get FDA approval for some of the features that require regulatory clearance first. Even while preparing its first product, the young startup is already settings its sights high, putting resources into R&D for non-invasive glucose monitoring and cuffless blood pressure measuring, which could quickly put it ahead of the competition.

The post Wearable health monitoring gets stylish with these rings that can potentially watch your glucose first appeared on Yanko Design.

This YouTuber made a Green Lantern Ring out of an actual meteorite rock





Patrick Adair isn’t your regular silversmith. In his own words, he makes rings “to stand out, not fit in”, and is known to stray away from common elements like gold, silver, or platinum. Instead, Adair’s jewelry is crafted from things like carbon fiber, damascus steel, titanium, a variety of highly eye-catching gemstones, and in this instance, an actual meteorite. While Adair’s methods, materials, and designs definitely set him apart, he even documents his ring-making processes on YouTube for his little-short-of-a-million fans. The video above remains one of my favorites, and has garnered nearly 5 million views. In it, Adair builds a lifelike replica of Green Lantern’s power ring using a block of meteorite rock, and an Emerald fitted into it. The result is nothing short of stunning, although the two-part video should truly fascinate any DIYers interested in the ring-making process.

The ring was pre-ordered by a client who sent Adair a replica of the Green Lantern ring for reference. Making the necessary measurements and design considerations, Adair started by water-jet cutting a piece out of a block of meteorite, before drawing the profiles of the design details on it. A few details (like straight lines, etc) were carved out using a milling machine, while other curved lines and profiles were hand-carved using a sanding disc and drills.

Once the entire ring was carved out of the meteorite rock, deburred, and polished to make it smooth and glossy, Adair proceeded to etch the ring by dunking it in an acid bath. The etching would reveal the meteorite rock’s ‘windsman pattern’, caused by the iron-nickel crystals forming a long structure. The etching process affects all the metals in the meteorite differently, resulting in the unique crisscross pattern that makes the ring look so otherworldly. Finally, an emerald gem was fitted in the top to complete the project before being handed over to the customer. Adair’s meteorite rings can go north of a grand, and I’m sure this one didn’t come cheap (considering he actually bought a CNC milling machine for this) but then again, people spend millions on NFTs and those things aren’t even real…

Designer: Patrick Adair Designs

This YouTuber made a Green Lantern Ring out of an actual meteorite rock





Patrick Adair isn’t your regular silversmith. In his own words, he makes rings “to stand out, not fit in”, and is known to stray away from common elements like gold, silver, or platinum. Instead, Adair’s jewelry is crafted from things like carbon fiber, damascus steel, titanium, a variety of highly eye-catching gemstones, and in this instance, an actual meteorite. While Adair’s methods, materials, and designs definitely set him apart, he even documents his ring-making processes on YouTube for his little-short-of-a-million fans. The video above remains one of my favorites, and has garnered nearly 5 million views. In it, Adair builds a lifelike replica of Green Lantern’s power ring using a block of meteorite rock, and an Emerald fitted into it. The result is nothing short of stunning, although the two-part video should truly fascinate any DIYers interested in the ring-making process.

The ring was pre-ordered by a client who sent Adair a replica of the Green Lantern ring for reference. Making the necessary measurements and design considerations, Adair started by water-jet cutting a piece out of a block of meteorite, before drawing the profiles of the design details on it. A few details (like straight lines, etc) were carved out using a milling machine, while other curved lines and profiles were hand-carved using a sanding disc and drills.

Once the entire ring was carved out of the meteorite rock, deburred, and polished to make it smooth and glossy, Adair proceeded to etch the ring by dunking it in an acid bath. The etching would reveal the meteorite rock’s ‘windsman pattern’, caused by the iron-nickel crystals forming a long structure. The etching process affects all the metals in the meteorite differently, resulting in the unique crisscross pattern that makes the ring look so otherworldly. Finally, an emerald gem was fitted in the top to complete the project before being handed over to the customer. Adair’s meteorite rings can go north of a grand, and I’m sure this one didn’t come cheap (considering he actually bought a CNC milling machine for this) but then again, people spend millions on NFTs and those things aren’t even real…

Designer: Patrick Adair Designs

This sleek technical watch design defies traditional watch-making with an elliptic shape and transparent case!

We’ve seen all-ceramic square watches, synchronized dancing clocks, and even watches with cyberpunk dreamworlds encased within glass domes. There are probably as many unique watch designs out there as there are designers for them. Watches typically represent fashionable microcosmic introductions to the people wearing them. That’s why vintage Casios can bring us right back to their heyday in the 70s or why wearing a watch similar to Tony Soprano’s 18K yellow gold Rolex can make us feel like mob bosses from New Jersey. Norm Edward’s elliptic-shaped technical watch brings us elsewhere, sometime in the distant future – maybe to the Hollywood set of the 52nd James Bond installment or a space community on Mars.

Heritier, a community of watch enthusiasts who create limited edition timepieces, aims to carry horology heritage and values into the 21st century by bridging global communities, partnerships, and charity initiatives with a joined love for watches. Edwards’ technical watch render began as a study in Heritier’s founder, Julien Bonzom’s passion for horology and watchmaking. Encased within a thin, double-paned glass dome, the clock’s inner workings are only slightly revealed. While some cogwheels and gears are within view, a multi-level, concentric design pulsates from the clock’s center and extends to the dial’s inner edge, where numerical minute markers indicate the time of day. Matte stainless steel accents both cradle and cleverly obstruct the glass dome, matching the round cluster of sprockets and gears at the timepiece’s overhanging extension, which keeps the watch in time.

Resembling the look of a joystick, or even a narrow egg-shape, Norm Edwards’ technical watch design could be envisioned wrapped around the wrist of some futuristic spy agent or a successful, metropolitan businessperson pelting between skyscrapers in a hovercraft. Whoever’s wearing it, the watch’s abstract shape and sleek, somewhat hidden inner-mechanism give off an air of composed complexity, a combination that has always mystified the world of timekeeping and watch-making alike, and always will.

Designer: Norm Edwards

Earphones that magnetically hang like a necklace for the ultimate tech-fashion statement

Being an audiophile means you take the audio quality and ergonomic fit of your earphones pretty seriously. If you get one that is stylish too, then you are in for a jackpot. Having a pair of earbuds that come with a snug fit, boast style statement and the reassurance of not being misplaced is something you just can’t ignore.

We are talking about these earphones that are designed to double up as a jewelry piece. Designed by Yibai Science & Technology from Shenzen, these are called the “Jade Culture Earphone Jue 20.” That’s a bit odd name but everything else about these conceptual wireless earbuds listed on iF Design Award 2020 is super cool. When not in use, the earbuds magnetically lock together to take the form of a necklace pendant that’s suspended by the tethering wire. Then again, when you want to listen to your favorite tunes, simply separate the pendant and get groovy. Picture this scenario – your buddy compliments, “This pendant looks so cool, bud”, and you’ll detach them and plug-in to your ears to their amazement, “It’s my pair of earbuds, mate!” Added bonus – you surely won’t lose one of the earbuds as there is no accidentally falling down- speaking to you AirPods!

The earbuds are designed keeping in mind the ergonomic comfort while listening to music for an extended duration of time, which is a usual affair with music lovers. They come with the “half-ring in-ear” method for use in the listening mode. To give them a sophisticated look – both as an earphone and modern jewelry piece – the makers have draped the outer sculptural shape in high-polished material. The glossy finish in emerald green and gold color options is classy and doesn’t look tacky in either use case scenario. Don’t be surprised if these designer earbuds kick-off a new trend of electronic jewelry – in particular – for wireless earphones or even True Wireless Earbuds.

Designer: Yibai Science & Technology

These fitness-tracking toe-rings are the perfect fusion of wearable tech and Indian culture

The Lexus Design Award-winning Mettis Rings are the perfect confluence of heritage and the future. Building on the cultural significance of jewelry in India, the Mettis are toe-rings that are state-of-the-art yet culturally relevant. These toe-rings come embedded with the same technology as any fitness wearable, in a package that embraces traditional values. Toe-rings are often given to women as wedding gifts in Indian lore, and are considered to have health benefits that align with Ayurvedic practices… the Mettis builds on that by introducing technology into the rings in a way that makes those health benefits more direct and appealing to younger generations.

Even though they house technology inside, the Mettis rings embrace the persona of jewelry. Built for Titan, a prominent watch and jewelry brand in the country, the rings come with a metallic finish and sit inside one of two sleek, matte black cases – for charging at home and for charging while traveling. Originally toe-rings in the Indian culture come made from silver, which absorbs positive energy from the ground you walk on. The Mettis, however, use sensors that help monitor your health. Whether you’re walking, running, exercising, or even swimming, the rings capture your body temperature and your heart-rate, working just like smartwatches and fitness wearables do. The rings actively track your location, count your steps, monitor sleep patterns, as well as help you keep track of your period cycles… all while strongly echoing the cultural relevance of toe-worn jewelry in Indian customs and traditions.

Designer: Anshuman Kumar for Titan Industries

This rustic bottle opener was designed to be an antique of the future!

An ideal way to spend a Friday night, after a long hectic day at work would be an opportunity to sip on some cold brews and spend some quality time with friends, both old and new. Inspired by this very notion, James Connors designed the Wayne Bottle Opener for idor, a small design store that aims to create antiques of the future.

Crafted from stainless steel and bronze, the bottle opener features two circles wherein the inner one splits and expands to form the outer one. The merging of both circles signifies the very act of connecting with your loved ones with a beverage of your choice. The bottle opener was created by 3D printing the metal, making every single piece unique and no two pieces exactly the same.

The designer claims there are about 100 techniques we can use with our fingers to pop open bottles using the Wayne Bottle Opener! However, the easiest one is to use the space between the two circles to open the bottles. And it gets even more interesting! The bottle opener also functions as a necklace or a coffee table piece. Place the artistic piece on your center table to add a pop of rustic metallic fun to it! Or slip a chain or string through it, to wear it around your neck as a quirky accessory.

A multifunctional bottle opener that serves as a decorative piece, and possesses fashion appeal? Available in options of Bronze-Silver and Bronze, The Wayne Bottle Opener works for everyone!

Designer: James Connors for idor

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With Vatican launched a wearable eRosary, is faith destined to meet tech?

In an era where smartwatches tell us not only the time but also how much we’ve walked, eaten, our body temperature, our biometric details and at the same time allow us to respond to texts, make calls and basically anything else we can think of, it’s not surprising that the Vatican has decided to dip its toe into the vast pool of opportunities that is wearable technology.

The Vatican has launched ‘The Click to Pray eRosary’; an interactive and app-driven wearable bracelet, that can be used to learn how to pray the rosary. Comprising of 10 black agate and hematite rosary beads and accompanied by a silver smart cross, the device was launched by the Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network and designed by GagdeTek Inc. The beads and the cross represent “the ever-enduring human faith”. Users need to make the sign of the cross on the interface of the smart cross to activate the eRosary.

Going beyond its aesthetics, the eRosary is also connected, logging the user’s progress and logs each rosary that is completed. You can sync the bracelet to its companion app “Click to Pray”, available on both iOS and Android. The app provides access to an audio guide, videos, and images, as well as “personalized content about the praying of the Rosary.” Three methods of prayer are offered to the user. They can either select the standard rosary, a contemplative rosary or thematic ones that are updated throughout the year in accordance with religious occasions and holidays. The Vatican did not neglect healthcare, and in fact added a feature wherein the eRosary tracks the user’s health data, encouraging users to “have a better lifestyle”.

“Aimed at the peripheral frontiers of the digital world where the young people dwell, the Click to Pray eRosary serves as a technology-based teaching tool to help young people pray the Rosary for peace and to contemplate the Gospel,” the Vatican said. They hope that this project “brings spiritual tradition and the latest technological advances together.” By incorporating technology with faith, it seems like the Vatican has taken a step towards inciting more participation and inclusivity when it comes to prayer activities. Though religion has been a part of our lives, will tracking people’s, especially the younger generation’s faith encourage them to be more involved in prayer and religion? Or will it just drive them away? With the independent attitude of the Millenials, it is quite hard to predict. A wearable device that records and tracks your daily prayers could lead to more inclusivity in faith, or it could prove to be a major stumbling block… that only time will tell.

Designer: GagdeTek Inc. (GTI) for The Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network 

Jony Ive’s latest project is a 100% diamond ring

jony_ive_diamond_1

You know Jonathan Ive and Marc Newson right? Just the most prolific designers of their age, working as design heads in the most profitable company in the world, Apple. Ive and Newson have altered how we treat consumer electronics, making us revere them as objects of fashion, and their latest design project may be less electronics and more fashion, but it echoes a sensibility and sensitivity that has for long been a culture within Apple.

Apple has been an integral part of RED (a nonprofit organization that partners with the iconic brands to raise money to fight HIV / AIDS in Africa through the Global Fund), designing special products for RED that contribute to RED’s fight against HIV and AIDS. You may remember the special RED edition iPhones from the past, or the special-edition Leica M that Ive and Newson designed which sold for a cool $1.8 million at RED’s auction.

Ive and Newson’s contribution to RED this year is a diamond ring, made in collaboration with Diamond Foundry®. Designed by the duo, the ring is different from most diamond rings, in the sense that it is 100% diamond. The ring is made from the diamond gemstone itself and doesn’t feature any metal or other gemstones. “Consistent with their mutual obsession with transforming raw material into objects of value, Ive & Newson’s design is singular, clear and un-compromised by the traditional metal settings and bands that have previously been required to create ‘diamond rings’. Theirs will be created by removing material rather than adding – an ambition made possible by the extraordinary scale of the stone which will enable the ring to be completely made of this material.” said auction house Sotheby’s.

“Creating a ring-shaped diamond is no small feat; the diamond block will be faceted with several thousand facets, some of which are as small as several hundred micrometers. The interior ring will be cylindrically cut out for the desired smoothness using a micrometer thick water jet inside which a laser beam is cast. The finished ring will have between 2000-3000 facets which has never been seen before on a single piece.”

The ring, which will be crafted by Diamon Foundry will be sold at the RED auction in Miami on the 5th of December (with a price range of $150-250K) and will be made to the size specifications of the buyer. Pretty unique, no? The ring doesn’t have a gemstone. The ring IS the gemstone!