Innovative Packaging Designs from the A’ Design Award that make the perfect first impression of a product

Your product’s packaging is arguably the first thing the consumer sees, as a part of the product experience. It forms the first ever interaction between product and consumer, and a successful interaction means a consumer will pick the product up off the aisle and add it to their cart. Bad packaging design can adversely affect a product’s success or its performance, while a well-packaged product allows it to stand out, prompting someone to pick it up and decide to purchase it. Packaging Design is more than just a box with artwork… it’s the product around the product, and deserves as much attention while designing as the item within it.

Packaging Design forms just one of the various categories of the A’ Design Award and Competition, which spans the popular categories like Architecture, Lighting, and Consumer Electronics, as well as the obscure, lesser-known categories like Cybernetics, Prosumer Products, and Safety Apparel Design. The A’ Design Award’s ultimate goal is to be an umbrella that covers good design across all disciplines, which is why it has 100 different categories for submitting design projects, and 211 jury members (comprising academics, design professionals, and press members) from all around the world collectively judging the works. Winners of the A’ Design Award don’t just secure a trophy and a certificate, but receive an entire PR Campaign dedicated towards pushing their career, clout, and even their projects to newer heights. A’ Design Award’s winners and even its participants are included in its annual award book and business network, while additionally contributing to their country’s overall design ranking that paints a holistic picture of how design-centric and design-forward each country is.

The A’ Design Award is currently accepting entries for the 2022 edition of the award program, so go ahead and give your work and career the push it deserves!

Here are some of our favorite Packaging Design winners from the A’ Design Award & Competition 2021. If you have a potential packaging design project that you think is worthy of an award, Click here to register & participate in the A’ Design Awards 2022. Hurry! The regular deadline ends on September 30th, 2021.

Nefer Perfume by Amr Ibrahim


Getting its name from the Egyptian word for beauty, the Nefer perfume bottle embodies sheer elegance on the inside and out. The bottle’s design is derived from the curved lines of the female figure, possibly as an ode to the ancient Egyptian Queen Nefertiti. It sports an incredibly intricate ornate exterior that could only be made through 3D printing, and while the exterior’s job is to captivate, a slim internal chamber holds the fragrant perfume within… like a beautiful soul within a beautiful body.

Zippo Constellation Packaging by Sunhwa Lee and Wenyuan Chen


I’m not one to buy lighters at all, but the best way to get me to buy a whole bunch of them is to arrange them in a packaging as alluring as this! The Zippo Constellation Box Set by Sunhwa Lee and Wenyuan Chen is a complete collection of 12 Zippo limited edition lighters with artwork depicting the 12 zodiac signs (also known as sun signs). The overall circular package has almost a cosmic-calendar-meets-ancient-sundial vibe to it, and it even lights up from the inside, bringing the constellation artwork in the center to life. The packaging is aimed at being a box set, although the designers envisioned that people would want to display it as a collectible too – which is why the circular box comes with a pop-out stand at the back. The lighters dock into the packaging via magnets, and can be popped out whenever you want to use or admire them. Only 100 such box sets are ever going to be made.

Regeneration Flower Tea Packaging by JieLong Wu and Lu Yi


This rather alluring box of teabags actually has more to it than you’d expect. Sure, it’s incredibly pretty to look at, and comes with 6 pyramid-shaped teabags… although the packaging’s also designed in a way to make discarding your teabag easier. Each individual teabag comes enclosed in a tetrahedral handmade paper box, and once you’ve opened the box, taken the bag out, and brewed your tea, you can put the used teabag back inside its paper box and discard it anywhere. Aside from being biodegradable, the handmade paper actually has flower seeds embedded between the paper fibers, and when introduced into soil, uses the tea leaves as fertilizer to grow. In the end, your discarded teabag ends up decomposing and becoming fertilizer for a flowering plant!

Fousu Sock Packing by GaoWei Xin


Modern anti-bacterial socks require modern-looking packaging! The Fousu socks come packaged in a rather sci-fi looking capsule made from recycled paper pulp. The pulp’s formed into the capsule shape using a set of molds (just like how an egg carton is made), although its overall design has a much better finish, which allows you to then print information onto the exterior. Designed to be discarded, each capsule comes with 3 pairs of rolled socks inside. I say discarded, but I’d probably just hold onto the box and use it to efficiently store my socks in the wardrobe!

Mingluye Baijiu Packaging by Wen Liu, Bo Zheng and Weijie Kang


While the alcoholic baijiu is often prepared using fermented sorghum, rice, or even wheat, Mingluye uses fermented mung beans, giving the traditional spirit a distinct flavor and aroma. The Mingluye bottle celebrates its origin by actually resembling the mung bean. The bottle’s overall shape and color bear a close resemblance to the bean, while the label on the front takes after the white germ of the sprouted mung bean! It’s an incredibly beautiful-looking bottle, isn’t it?

Alpine Ancient Trees Tea Packaging by Xiaobin Li, Xingguo Li and Shilin Huang


The Alpine Ancient Trees tea packaging pays respect to the hilly terrain on which tea plantations grow. The incredibly premium box set opens up to reveal two spherical packages of tea leaves nested inside mountains made out of corrugated paper. Once you take the spherical packages of tea out, the box can then be repurposed into a holder for tiny bonsai planters, giving it a new purpose and preventing it from going to waste.

Paris Design Week 2021 Recap: Here are our top favorite designs from this year’s physical Maison et Objet event!

After having to host a strictly online-only version of their trade fair last year because of the global pandemic, Maison&Objet made a grand comeback to their in-person physical event this year. The event saw an overwhelming response, with as many as 1476 participants and over 80,000 attendees getting together to help propel the design industry forward, and allow design businesses to thrive. The event was spread out among 7 halls, covering multiple different themes, spotlighting thousands of businesses and design studios, and showcasing a dizzying variety of new and classic products. Here in this list, we handpick a few standout designs that we absolutely loved at the Maison&Objet fair held at the 2021 Paris Design Week.

a.bsolument Vintage-inspired Bluetooth Radios


Didn’t you know retro is back? Well, if you’re going to be listening to retro throwback music, what better device to listen to it on than an a.bsolument radio? The France-based company takes antique radios from the 60s and 70s, and upgrades them with more modern innards, like better speakers and even Bluetooth capability. It isn’t easy sourcing these radios from more than 50 years ago, but a.bsolument’s somehow managed to get their hands on a MASSIVE bunch of small transistors, pocket radios, home radios, and many more, and they’re all being refurbished to give them a new lease of life. Most of them still look incredibly classy, if you ask me.

koziol Pascal Lunch Box Cultery Set

The Pascal is a nifty, all-in-one lunchbox with its own snap-on cutlery set that lets you grab a quick bite anywhere. Made from environmentally friendly materials, the lunchbox is food-safe, modular, and can suit a variety of cuisines. It comes with 3 containers and koziol’s KLIKK cutlery set, and can be infinitely reused, so you never have to worry about single-use takeout containers or cutlery ever again!

Horl Rolling Knife Sharpener

The key to grinding your kitchen blades perfectly lies in a number of factors, two of the most important ones being A. angle, and B. directional consistency… both of which the Horl Knife Sharpener take into careful consideration. Designed to be easy enough for amateurs to use, Horl’s foolproof process results in knives so perfectly whetted, they look like they were sharpened by experts. The setup comes with a sharpening stone mounted on a rolling barrel design, and a unique jig that holds your knife at an exact 15° angle as the roller grinds the blade. This way, both the angle and directional consistency are taken care of and all you need to do is mount your knife on the magnetic jig and roll the sharpener up and down a few times.

Wunderkey Key Organizer

A standing example of German efficiency, the Wunderkey is a functional bit of EDC that organizes your keys into a small, Swiss Knife-inspired stick that’s slim enough to fit in your pocket. The Wunderkey makes it easy to organize and access your keys, and if the sound of jangling keychains annoys you, the tightly packed design ensures you don’t sound like a one-man Mariachi band. The Wunderkey comes in a choice of materials, including a modern aluminum body, a classic leather exterior, and if you’re feeling fancy, carbon fiber!

Prêt à Pousser Nano Modular Indoor Planter


If you remember the Nano Garden from back in May, Prêt à Pousser has now expanded their ecosystem to make the Nano even more modular and suitable for households. Instead of opting for individual Nano planters, you can now get stacks of 3 and even modules of 4, allowing you to expand your home garden with a selection of floral plants, purifying plants, and even kitchen greens! The planters still come with the self-watering feature, the soil-free design, and the sun-mimicking lamp that nourishes your plant!

Kreafunk Bluetooth Speakers


With a wonderfully contemporary Danish design, Kreafunk’s speakers look as beautiful as they sound. The way they’re designed makes them blend beautifully into home interiors, with their use of metal, plastic, fabric, and occasionally leather, all combined together to make something that rivals even the best smart speakers. Shown above is the aCOUSTIC, a pretty slick-looking wireless speaker that pumps out a good 30 hours of music on a full charge. It comes with a handle that makes it easy to carry around the house, sports an IP55 dust and water repellent design which means you can carry it outdoors too, and here’s the best part – it supports wireless charging, so you can easily place the speaker on a charging pad when the battery runs low!

Lexon Oblio Wireless Charger + UV Sanitizer


Put your phone right into the Oblio’s slot and it immediately begins sanitizing as well as wirelessly charging your device. A 10W wireless charger at the back juices your phone in just 20 minutes, giving the Oblio enough time to use a front-facing UV-C lamp to sterilize your phone’s screen. The Oblio’s unique form factor not only makes it look like a chic little planter around your house but also cleverly hides your phone from view, so you’re less likely to constantly fiddle with it during the charging/sanitation cycle. It’s a clever bit of design, tech, and a behavioral-change solution all wrapped in one!

Kikkerland Crab Multitool


Most crustaceans belong in the sea, some in the kitchen, but the Crab Multi-Tool by Kikkerland definitely belongs in the latter! The Crab comes with a beechwood body and 6 multitools, comprising a pair of scissors, a bottle opener, a 3/16 flat head screwdriver, a can opener, a mini knife, and a rope saw. Fold them up to make the multi-tool look compact, like a meditating crab. The minute you need a helping hand (or claw), unfold the crab’s many arms and it’ll show you just how useful it is!

8 Magnificent Architecture and Urban-Space Designs from the iF Design Award global community

The iF Design Award has been consistently hand-picking the best, most innovative designs since 1953, honoring top-class achievements in categories spanning Product Design, Transportation Design, Communication Design, Packaging, Service Design, Architecture, Interior Architecture, Professional Concepts, and UI and UX for 67 years in a row. The entire iF Design Award program saw as many as 10,000 submissions this year, which were evaluated by 98 international design experts from 21 countries, on the iF Jury.

Just this year alone, 1,744 designs received the iF Design Award for their creative accomplishments across various categories, while an additional 75 designs went on to win the highly-coveted iF gold award for their outstanding work. The iF Design Award always culminates in a grand ceremony in Berlin, although owing to the pandemic and global travel restrictions, award-winning products and projects this year are being celebrated digitally with an international content campaign encapsulated by the slogan “The CreatiFe Power of Design” in cooperation with popular design platforms and seven renowned design museums.

Over the course of the next few months, Yanko Design will be curating and featuring winning designs from this year’s program too – we’ve hand-picked eight award-winning designs from the ‘Architecture and Urban Spaces’ category below (the list even features TWO iF Gold Award winners)! All the iF Design Award winners can also be viewed on the newly-launched iF Design App that gives you access to a grand database of award-winning design projects and their creators, right at your fingertips!

To view all these designs and many more, visit the website of the iF DESIGN AWARD.

Click Here to download the brand new iF Design App – a new experience in discovering outstanding designs


Award-Winning Architecture and Urban-Space Designs from the iF Design Award 2021

OSOL Art Pavilion by SOAP Design Studio for Gyeonggi Cultural Foundation (iF Gold Award Winner)

The OSOL Pavilion is a symbol of renewed beginnings and of friendship, as it stands at a place that was once littered with military fences. Built on the west coast of South Korea, the permanent exhibit marks the relaxing of military tension between North and South Korea, and sits among a forest of pine-trees facing the tranquil Yellow Sea. Inspired by the reflection of light on the sea, OSOL, the pine forest-like structure made from anodized aluminum, reflects the surrounding colors and allows visitors to gain a new perspective on the relationship between man and nature, encouraging them to develop a deeper appreciation of nature.

Traits Video Sketching App by Wolf In Motion (iF Gold Award Winner)

A sketching app with a difference, Traits lets you build architectural plans directly by drawing on videos. Paired along with drone footage, it’s the ultimate architecture and urban planning tool, providing a simple and inclusive way to plan out buildings without being too intrusive and requiring expensive filming crews and design-visualization teams. The app performs complex object tracking and lets you draw literally in a point in space, allowing you to easily make architectural plans and sketches directly onto video footage of the land, for quicker decision-taking.

Seoul Botanic Park by Samoo Architects & Engineers, and THE_SYSTEM LAB

Seoul Botanic Park was built in Magok, on the southwestern side of the Han River in Seoul, to create an urban public space that can introduce flora and cultures of 12 global cities and enhance ecological sensitivity. While most greenhouses come with a geodesic dome-shaped design, the Seoul Botanic Park flips this notion with its uniquely recognizable 100m wide concave roof. The rim of the greenhouse is higher than its center, giving it the resemblance of a flower – a feature that’s further highlighted by the petal-shaped pillars around the outer edge of the park.

The Future Of Us Pavilion by Thomas Schroepfer – Advanced Architecture Laboratory SUTD

The inspiration for The Future Of Us Pavilion was the visually beautiful experience of walking under the foliage of lush trees in the tropics. This idea was translated into a design with a clear mathematical logic that was determined by extensive environmental simulations and structural optimizations, resulting in an artificial canopy that still felt natural as you walked underneath it. Light filtered through the canopy’s perforated design – a phenomenon the Japanese call Komorebi – and as the canopy cut out a major chunk of sunlight, the area underneath was naturally cooled by the shade. Located in Gardens by the Bay Singapore, The Future Of Us Pavilion (also known as the Bayfront Pavilion) follows the tradition of architectural structures that evoke a dialogue with nature by blending an intricate form made of a perforated skin fluidly with the adjacent environments. For visitors, the building offers a climatically comfortable outdoor environment and a visual experience akin to walking under the foliage of lush tropical trees.

A House by Clearspace Design & Research

Adopting the rather traditional-looking A-Frame format, the simply named ‘A House’ is a combination of old but new and technical but naturally green. The building’s brick exterior is punctuated by transparent glass ‘curtains’ that not only give the exterior a uniquely memorable look, but even help illuminate the house’s interiors too. Although it’s titled ‘A House’, the building actually serves as a workplace, offering a close relationship between people and the natural environment. The designers also mention that it was refurbished following the 3Rs: Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle.

Cloister of Green Light by CYS.ADSO for Newland Developers Group

At this sales center, visitors can quietly experience the environment with their own senses instead of through text or speech. The amoeba-shaped building weaves through trees, coexisting with the flora without influencing or disturbing it. In order to achieve this, the designers thought of breaking the singular building mass into smaller scattered building units. These units are arranged randomly like satellites around the original trees, connected by the winding cloister and encircling the old tree at the center of the site.

V-Plaza by 3deluxe architecture for SBA Group

Yet another example of organic architectural design, the V-Plaza is a visionary plaza that is a celebration of contemporary mobility. Cyclists and scooters cruise along organically curved levels, between them oases of tranquility, water features, cafes, and restaurants. This hybrid of a skatepark, playground, and urban living room provides the perfect congregating point for the young, dynamic public of Lithuania.

DISC (Descente Innovation Studio Complex) by cre-te

Designed to be a sports R&D lab, the circular shape of the building is a reference to the circular tracks that runners dash around. It’s also characterized by an artificial hill in the form of a spiraling lawn that surrounds the building, creating a rather unusual blend of greenery and architecture. “Through this winding artificial hill, DISC achieves harmony with the urban context while maintaining an eco-friendly design”, mention the designers. The building’s design draws the viewers’ eyes to its center, which exists almost like a crater. Within this center is the building’s courtyard, its green heart, an open space for creative communication.

To view all these designs and many more, visit the website of the iF DESIGN AWARD.

Breathtaking Architecture designs from the 2021 A’ Design Award that’ll make your jaw drop

Goethe’s words “I call architecture frozen music” couldn’t ring more true for these 8 structural marvels. If architecture truly is frozen music, this article is a mixtape of 2020-21’s greatest hits.

A part of A’ Design Award and Competition‘s winner list, these buildings are awarded for the uniqueness of the project, social impacts, environment friendliness, energy utilization, and other project-specific criteria. Ranging from conceptual designs to residential units, to spas, offices, museums, and retail spaces, the A’ Design Award covers architecture in its entirety, aside from a wide roster of other categories. Not only does winning an A’ Design Award look great on an architect’s resume, but it also brings a lot of repute and focus to the work, uplifting its value!

Architecture remains the most popular category at the A’ Design Awards, receiving entries by the thousands each year. Here are a few favorites that we wish we had enough money to afford!

The A’ Design Award is currently accepting entries for the 2022 edition of the award program, so go ahead and give your work and career the push it deserves!

If you’re an architect or spatial designer looking to participate in the A’ Design Awards this year, click here to register. Hurry! The regular deadline ends on September 30th, 2021.


Living The Noom by Sanzpont Arquitectura

Designed by Mexico-based Sanzpont Arquitectura, ‘Living In The Noom’ puts you in the lap of nature and luxury. Its sanctuary-esque design focuses on three broad pillars – Wellness, Sustainability, and Flexibility. The community features multiple 4-storeyed houses with a uniquely alluring triangular shape, characterized by vertical bamboo channels and a vertical forest growing on the outer facade of the building. Along with giving Noom’s residents a stellar home to live in, the project even comes with amenities like greenery (70% of the project’s area is covered in nature – the buildings occupy just 30% of the overall space), as well as rejuvenation centers, meditation areas, parks, pools, workshop-centers for art, and even the organic garden for healthy eating. Finally, the structure culminates in a terrace on the fifth floor that has solar panels for harvesting energy, and an urban garden where the residents can grow their own food.

Flowers of Clouds Observation Tower by Vu Van Hai

Characterized by its rolling hills coated with pine trees, marigolds, and mimosa flowers, Da Lat is considered one of Vietnam’s most romantic cities. The Tower Flower, an observation tower molded into the shape of a flower in the early stages of blooming, sings an ode to those rolling hills of Da Lat with terrace gardens and biophilic design principles. Designed to be a coffee boutique bar as part of a larger resort complex, The Tower Flower’s spherical frame features facades that mimic flowers blooming with rich orange corten steel modules that form the structure’s large petals. Twisting throughout the building’s interior, a winding ramp emulates the flow and curve of a river to allow the surrounding landscape and interior garden to gradually appear to each guest and visitor. Inside the coffee boutique bar, visitors and residents can enjoy views of the surrounding landscape as well as the structure’s interior garden that pays tribute to the Lotus flower, the symbol for pure beauty in Buddhism.

Time Holiday Mobile Home by Chester Goh

Designed so that you can have a cabin in the woods, a house on the lake, or a property on the beach whenever you want, the Time Holiday is a mobile home that’s focused on what designer Chester Goh calls ‘futuristic sustainability… or basically architecture that’s nomadic, so you don’t need to build multiple homes. Saving on total costs and unnecessary construction waste, these modular pods/villas come prefabricated and do not require any foundation. They’re built to be stable, spacious, and structurally sound, and can easily be lifted up and shifted anywhere on the planet without any limitations to terrains and topography. “Wanting to wake up to the morning of serene blue sea, lush green grassland, or a majestic golden dessert in a modular pod that is closely connected to nature has been the driving inspiration to this project”, says designer Chester Goh.

Shenzhen Transsion Holdings Office by Aedas


The terms ‘natural’ and ‘boxy’ don’t often go together, except with buildings like the Shenzhen Transsion Holdings office, where they’re made to combine together in a nature-meets-architecture solution. The building’s rather template-ish skyscraper design is beautifully punctuated by greenery that creates a feeling of ‘openness’ within the confines of the architecture. These intermediate ‘open spaces’ create variety and interactions between the staff and offices, to demonstrate the corporate spirit of “co-operation and co-sharing” through symbolic architecture… I’d call it a rather literal interpretation of being in a ‘concrete jungle’!

Bayfront Pavilion by Thomas Schroepfer – AAL


The inspiration for the Bayfront Pavilion was the visually beautiful experience of walking under the foliage of lush trees in the tropics. This idea was translated into a design with a clear mathematical logic that was determined by extensive environmental simulations and structural optimizations, resulting in an artificial canopy that still felt natural as you walked underneath it. Light filtered through the canopy’s perforated design – a phenomenon the Japanese call Komorebi – and as the canopy cut out a major chunk of sunlight, the area underneath was naturally cooled by the shade. Located in Gardens by the Bay Singapore, the Bayfront Pavilion (also known as The Future of Us Pavilion) follows the tradition of architectural structures that evoke a dialogue with nature by blending an intricate form made of a perforated skin fluidly with the adjacent environments. For visitors, the building offers a climatically comfortable outdoor environment and a visual experience akin to walking under the foliage of lush tropical trees.

The Rossmore Residential Multi-Unit by Artur Nesterenko and Amr Samaha


A beautiful interpretation of art-deco architecture, the Rossmore residential building turns concrete into fabric with how it curves, almost like the curtains seen in theaters. The concrete pillars curve and pleat as they travel downwards, mimicking fabric curtains seen in grand halls built during the art-deco era. “The Rossmore is set to utilize high-performance concrete cladding panels with sculptural elements for the facades while being one of the first massive timber mid-high-rise apartment buildings in Los Angeles”, say the designers.

Nudibranch Hotel and Resort by SpActrum


Inspired by shellfish, the Nudibranch hotel comes with an instantly recognizable shell-like facade, and has ‘tentacles’ that stretch out in different directions, creating a piece of architecture that looks absolutely mesmerizing from any angle. Named after the nudibranch, a type of mollusk, the hotel stands as a wonderful example of nature-inspired design. The ‘shell’ of the hotel forms its main building, while the rest of its body surrounds the shell, forming lawns and pathways above the sandy coast of the beach. The tentacles (which aren’t visible in the above image) are actually covered pathways that connect the ground to restaurants and bars, and the spa and swimming pool to the main hotel itself.

Solar Veloroute Photovoltaic Pathway by Peter Kuczia


Bike roads, also known as Veloroutes are steadily becoming city staples, even mainstays for commuters on foot or bike. With the demand for Veloroutes increasing, Kuczia created a Solar Veloroute that comprises a photovoltaic tunnel structure that serves as a solar canopy for cyclists and pedestrians as well as a public facility where commuters can enjoy lit pathways at night and charging stations for bicycles or smartphones. Solar Veloroute presents as a partly-enclosed, rounded archway constructed from overlaid non-reflective glass-glass solar panels, which are attached to round tube steel purlins. While the Solar Veloroute collects solar energy during the day for on-site charging stations and lighting, the surplus energy collected can be distributed and used for additional services. On the structure’s sustainably sourced power, Kuczia says, “Just one kilometer of [Solar Veloroute] could provide around 2,000 MWh of electricity and could power 750 households or provide electricity for more than 1,000 electric cars driving 11,000 km per year.”

If you’re an architect or spatial designer looking to participate in the A’ Design Awards this year, click here to register. Hurry! The regular deadline ends on September 30th, 2021.

Experimental Industrial Designer Michael Young describes his diverse work as “Industrial Art”

It’s really difficult to pinpoint Michael Young’s style. A lot of designers develop a very recognizable quality that allows you to box their work into a certain category, but that’s far from true in the case of Hong Kong-based Industrial Designer Michael Young. Young’s work is best described as experimental, as he dips into a world of creativity shaped by his life in Britain, Iceland, Taiwan, Brussels, and finally Hong Kong. Young’s studio specializes in creating modern design through exploring the endless possibilities Asia’s technological ingenuity provides, while constantly pushing to experiment with new materials and see how they inform the design of different products within different categories.

Yanko Design had a chance to reach out to Michael and take a closer look at some of his work from the years gone by. Michael graduated from Kingston University in 1992 and set up his design studio the following year. With nearly 3 decades in the industry, he’s made a name for himself as one of the leading international figures in his field, and the Michael Young Studio aims at providing exclusive, quality design services across an eclectic range of markets – from interiors to technology. His minimalist, elegant, and sophisticated style is a trademark in his body of work, which has always attracted the attention of the industry and has been acquired by public institutions such as the Pompidou Center and the Louvre Museum. “It is Design as Industrial Art that interests me, not just as a limited edition, but on a scale of mass production”, Michael says about his approach to creativity and design.

Click Here to visit Michael Young’s website and view his work


Michael Young x Coalesse – LessThanFive Carbon Fiber Chair

A winner of the iF Gold Award, the LessThanFive chair gets its name from the fact that it weighs less than 5 pounds. Made entirely from carbon-fiber, the chair was a collaborative project between Michael Young and Coalesse, a Steelcase brand. The chair explores carbon fiber as a material for furniture by pushing the boundaries of what the material can do. The chair’s form is so elegantly slim that it can only be made out of carbon fiber (any other material would cause it to buckle), and even though it weighs less than 5 lbs, it can hold a stunning 300lbs of weight!

Michael Young x O.D.M. – Hacker Watch

The Hacker Watch encapsulates Young’s east-meets-west approach rather perfectly. “ODM was a local brand and at the time had not worked with an international designer at this level. Paul So, the CEO, is a great thinker and had predicted world timepiece recession, due to smartphones, long before they became household items”, says Young. The watch was designed as a result of this approach, and combined an iconic design along with an affordable price, making the watch instantly desirable, even in an age where people just read the time on their smartphone. The watch was designed and manufactured in 2011, when the smartphone movement had just picked up pace.

Michael Young – MY Collection

The MY Collection first premiered at Gallery ALL in LA and Beijing, and comprised a chair, a side table, a writing desk, a round coffee table, a console, and a lounge chair. The unusually designed pieces featured polished stainless steel honeycomb frames, inlaid with white enamel surfaces. Each piece consisted of a cluster of hollow metal extrusions capped at each end and covered with enamel, making the furniture look less like conventional home decor and more like eye-catching jewelry. “A while back, I had worked with cloisonné in Northern China and began to look at how patterns and colors came together and how metal could be shaped to create divisions of form”, Michael mentions. “Some of my earlier attempts were inspired by oil on water and the natural patterns generated by this when taken in a snapshot. For Gallery ALL, we looked at these in a new way by self-generating forms created by the computer, and then we extracted the patterns in two-dimensional slices.”

Michael Young x Moke International – Moke Car

Initially produced to share some of the Mini’s mechanical parts, but with a more rugged body shell to give it a life intended for the beach, the Moke holds its own as a historic and cult car with a rich 50-year history that was sadly put out of production in 1993. However, when Young got an email asking if he would work on redesigning a Moke reissue, he called it a “call of duty as a Moke Enthusiast”. It was essential to strike an equal balance for the old enthusiast and the new generation of Moke drivers, like himself. After redesigning and reengineering more than 160 new parts the MOKE was brought back, better than ever. “It has the same spirit, the same style and is just as suave as the original Moke”, says Young.

Michael Young x CIGA Design – Templates Watch

The Template watch hopes to merge the movement and face into one singular piece. It isn’t as much a skeletal watch as it is a work of art that also displays the watch’s fine engineering. Yet another winner of the iF Gold Award, the Template Watch flips the tradition of having a plain watch-face and integrating a transparent exhibition back to showcase the watch’s movement. Instead, the ornately designed watch-face itself lets you peer through and see certain aspects of the watch’s movement. It balances its ‘industrial aesthetic’ with curved edges on the watch-face, that give it a softness to the appearance.

Michael Young – Oxygen Chair

Perhaps one of the most unusual projects in Michael’s body of work, the Oxygen Chair has a strangely relic-esque quality to it… along with an incredibly interesting manufacturing method. The chairs are molded out of aluminum that’s injected into steel casts along with high-temperature gas at immensely high pressures (hence the name Oxygen Chair). The process is somewhat similar to how rocks are formed, and the resulting chair looks less like metal and more like an excavated block of stone with imperfect, porous surfaces that are almost in line with igneous rocks. Finally, to give the furniture its color, it’s coated in a way similar to ceramic glazing, but with absolutely rustic and unusual results. The final chair challenges the archetypes of furniture and craftsmanship, offering a radically experimental manufacturing method that results in chairs fit to be in a museum!

Michael Young x Lasvit – Homune Table

Once again challenging the archetypes of furniture, the Homune Table combines jewelry and furniture design into one absolutely eye-catching final product. The Homune Table’s base comes hand-blown from amber-glass, giving it an almost gem-like appeal that’s accentuated by the geometric design of the base. The honeycomb structure isn’t just an aesthetic detail, but rather gives the table strength too, while the complete glass design really sets it apart as bordering on glass solitaire.

Michael Young x Christopher Farr – Voronic & Tessellation Rugs

Designed to look less like a fabric rug and more like stained-glass art, the Voronic & Tesselation Rugs is a result of a long-time partnership between Young and rug-company Christopher Farr. The use of voronoi patterns gives the rug an aesthetic that’s a massive deviation from the oriental and occidental rug styles, or even contemporary rugs, that are either rectangular or circular in shape. ‘Voronic’, a hand-knotted rug, and ‘Tessellation’, a hand-tufted version are both designs configured through Young experimenting with a voronoi pattern. This motif is found in nature – where it is perhaps most instantly recognizable as the pattern of a giraffe’s skin, or even in the cellular patterns found on leaves. With various points of shape and color, this rug is infinitely customizable, allowing it to expand as a series, or even be tailor-made to certain spaces/rooms/interior styles.


Young’s work spans nearly three decades, multiple continents, and features clients/brands like Steelcase, Titan, Lacoste, Coca Cola, Absolut, Hair, CIGA Design, Native Union, and many more. He’s been a recipient of multiple awards, including the iF Design Award, Red Dot Design Award, Tokyo Good Design Award, German Design Award, and the Eurobike Awards, among others. Young’s work has even found itself a home in institutions like the Louvre, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and The Design Museum. Click here to visit Michael Young’s website and see his other works.

Here are the hottest winning-designs from the A’ Design Award 2021

While we slowly put this pandemic in our rear-view mirror, here’s something to look forward to – the A’ Design Award and Competition 2021 just announced their annual winners. Spanning literally a hundred categories, the A’ Design Awards look at creating a holistic list of the best designs internationally, across all disciplines. While the Coronavirus has definitely put a damper on awards who are looking to conduct exhibitions and gala nights for their winners, that hasn’t stopped the A’ Design Award from making sure their winners get their share of the international limelight!

The A’ Design Award and Competition is much more than just your average awards program. It actively seeks good design, markets it, brings value to the project as well as the designer in the form of a wide range of value-added services like a dedicated PR Campaign, an online exhibition, and even a platform to sell your design on… and these perks aren’t just limited to the design, they extend to the designers and creators too. Your participation entitles you to a proof-of-creation document, inclusion in A’ Design’s Business Network, and the Design Fee Calculator service that lets you accurately price your design services for future clients, allowing you to set up your design practice.

Judged by a grand jury of 211 elite designers and educators, here are a select few of A’ Design Award and Competition 2021’s winners. We’ve hand-picked some of our favorites from this year’s list of winners spanning categories such as Product Design, Social Design, Tech, Furniture, Medical, and Transportation Design. Scroll down below to have a look at what’s making the waves this year in the design circuit! And don’t forget to register below to participate in the competition for 2021-22 to make sure your work as well as you get the recognition you deserve!

Grab an Early-bird Registration for A’ Design Awards 2021 by clicking here!


YD Handpicks: Winning Designs from A’ Design Awards 2018-19

CanguRo Mobility Robot by Shunji Yamanaka – fuRo

The CanguRo Mobility Robot is a classic example of building the future by looking at the past. For centuries (if not millennia), humans have rode on horses as transport. The horse, unlike a car or motorcycle, forms a relationship with the rider over time, following, responding to commands, and remaining subservient to its owner. The CanguRo Mobility Robot provides a similar experience with a three-wheeled robot that the user can ride, summon via their smartphone, and even walk ahead of as the robot follows them along. The three-wheeled mobility bot is autonomous, which gives the rider a certain degree of freedom. It can be summoned from the parking lot by simply tapping a button, and can even follow you around as you walk. However, when you want to ride it, straddle yourself in its seat and the three wheels spread apart, providing you with a comfortable, controlled, and stable driving experience!

Standly Bao Folding Chair by Ming Hsiu Lee and Hu Jui Chung

We all need to take a break from being in one single posture all day long, whether that’s sitting in a home-office chair, or lazing with a laptop in bed. To make things easier and healthier for those spending all day on their feet, Designer Ming Shiu Lee created Standly Bao – an assistive device for workers that keeps them in a healthy standing posture and mental state while still having mobility. The Standly Bao is a slightly tilted structure designed to support three different pressure points – the hip, knees, and feet. The aim is to provide support to these points and reduce the pressure on lower limbs thus keeping workers from becoming habituated to a wrong standing posture which can result in long-term health problems. When using Standly Bao, the user rests in a position between standing and sitting. The stand can be folded up and is able to fit in narrow spaces without obstructing anything. The stand helps to correct your posture and alleviate headache, shoulder pain, neck stiffness, lower back pain, and more.

Eli Functional Pour-over Coffee Maker by Chenchen Fan

Although there are a whole bunch of travel coffee makers out there in the world, none of them are like the Eli. The capsule-shaped coffee maker turns the brewing, steeping, and pouring experience into one singular movement, making the coffee-making experience much more convenient. It all starts with the Eli’s design, which consists of the brewing chamber and two cups, all connected to a single lever that allows you to lift to brew, tilt to pour, and push down to close the brewer. Lift the lever up in its vertical position and you have your conventional pour-over style coffee maker. Once the coffee’s ready, tilt the lever diagonally and tip the brewing chamber over and coffee pours right into the cup directly below it. By controlling the position of the lever, you control which cup you’re pouring coffee into… and when you’re done, just push the lever right down and the Eli goes from being a vertical brewer to a flat little appliance you can stash anywhere in your kitchen.

Poetry – Wireless Charger + Lamp by Yong Zhang and Lei Wang

Poetry isn’t your average wireless charging appliance. It’s an expressive little gadget that lights up your space while charging up your phone. Styled to look like an abstract bonsai tree for your table, Poetry provides a space to dock your phone while also providing a wash of ambient light to your workspace. What’s more is that the Poetry even comes with its own detachable power-bank that you can remove and use independently anywhere you go. When you’re back at your desk, just pop the power-bank back in its place and it begins recharging too!

Pad Chair by Shaohan Yang

The Pad Chair transforms from a benign wooden mat into a neat chair with a backrest! Made from multiple wooden strips joined together in a rather unique way, the Pad Chair possesses the ability to transform from a flat, 2D shape into a neat, comfortable 3D chair. I’m sure there’s a locking system in place that allows the chair to lock in either closed or open positions, but for now, the Pad Chair provides a radical alternative to those ugly metal foldable chairs (the kind you’d see on wrestling shows). What the Pad Chair offers as an alternative looks incredibly classy, in both its closed as well as open versions!

Medapti Oral Medicine Syringe Adapter by Dorota Dyk

Perhaps one of the most clever ways to get a baby to take their medicine, the Medapti lulls the baby into a sense of comfort and calm, while allowing parents to cleverly feed their children food or medicine. The Medapti is designed to be a soother that allows you to attach a feeding syringe on the other end. Just pop the Medapti in the child’s mouth and use the syringe to inject food and medicine right in. Sure, it may seem like a cheap little trick to your toddler, but it’s an equally effective solution for parents!

Elytra Space Saver Coffee Table by Radhika Dhumal

In an unusually beautiful case of nature-inspired design, the Elytra table by Radhika Dhumal expands in size by ‘spreading its wings’! The table comes inspired by beetles and the way their wings nest perfectly around their body. The table itself comes with perfectly natural bug-like proportions that fit in well as garden decor, and uses two ‘wings’ to expand in surface, much like the beetle. Elytra’s design is dominated by rounded forms that give it a friendly, pet-like demeanor and its four legs are positioned in a way that gives the Elytra its unique, animal-like stance. The table’s surfaces are split into four broad parts, including a wooden ‘head’ and ‘body’ as well as two glass-inlay wings that can be opened out to expand the table’s surface to store an extra few cups of tea, a planter or two, and perhaps a notebook to doodle your ideas on!

Ori Accent Chair by Manish Maheshwari

It’s unfair to brand the Ori as a chair when it clearly is a throne! Designed to give the person sitting on it a grand halo, the Ori chair makes a clever use of folded metal to create its signature design. Inspired by (and even named after) origami, the chair uses sheet metal with perforated fold-lines in its design. The perforations allow the metal to easily bend along a desired path, giving the chair its signature pleated design. However, in the interest of comfort, the seating area along with the backrest of the chair come with triangular wooden pieces put into the metal’s folds, creating a flat surface to sit on and lean against. Wonderful, isn’t it??

The Board Skateboard by Chia-Wei Chen

The Board is an award-winning collapsible skateboard that is inspired by the same mechanical linkage system seen in collapsing gates, in scissors, and in those expandable grabber toys you’re probably familiar with. It’s hard to think of how skateboards and gates have any design-process overlap, but The Board makes it clear that a detail found in one product can easily and effectively be ported onto another product with stunning results. The Board uses this collapsible linkage system to make itself more portable. Machined metal components are arranged, sandwiched, and connected to each other with multiple pivot points to make The Board’s body. These linkages allow The Board to expand and collapse just by pulling or pushing it, taking it from a long, skateboard shape to a much more compact and carryable circular shape that easily fits right into backpacks. The metal construction gives The Board its signature strength (so the pieces don’t bend or flex when you stand on the skateboard), while also imparting a unique appearance to it, whether open or closed!

Origami Fashion Mask by Yuriko Wada

There’s something very charming about the Origami Fashion Mask that clearly sets it apart from the clinical aesthetic of your signature blue surgical face mask. Its unique pleated design allows it to naturally curve around your face, going from side to side without leaving any visible air gaps. The mask comes made from a non-woven breathable fabric filter-cloth, and the folded edges are painted with a thin gold line, giving the mask a decorative appeal. Designed to be worn at functions and celebrations, the Origami Fashion Mask folds flat into a bookmark-shaped sleeve and can be mailed along with invitation cards. That way, all your guests get the invitation and are also aware of the mask-wearing protocol at the event. Plus, it almost becomes a part of a grand costume/trend to see all the guests wearing the same style of mask!

Grab an Early-bird Registration for A’ Design Awards 2021 by clicking here!

The top 10 cabin designs of March are here to provide the perfect architectural escapism!

I love each and every kind of vacation, I do not have any prejudices against any, whether it’s by the beach, on a mountaintop, on a cruise in the middle of the ocean – every type of holiday has my heart. However, I do harbor a soft spot for cabin getaways! I would prefer nothing better than lounging about in a peaceful little cabin tucked away in the middle of the woods. Away from the world, society, and the Internet! It’s a beautiful chance to reconnect with nature, breathe in some fresh oxygen, and simply rejuvenate yourself with a clear mind and even clearer surroundings. I don’t know when I’ll be able to embark on a cabin vacation next, but in anticipation of one, here’s a list of the best cabin designs Yanko Design has seen this March, that are sure to give you the travel bug! From a cabin-style eco-hotel to a little pyramid-shaped cabin in the Finnish forest, we’ve got an assortment of cabin designs to match your every mood!

Cube Two is a 263-square-foot home that is designed for the future and smart living. This modern compact home is a prefabricated structure that already comes fitted with the latest home appliances that can all be controlled by an AI assistant named Canny. The exterior has smooth curved corners that give it a friendly vibe and the interior offers enough space for a family of four to live comfortably with two bedrooms and an open living area. To make it feel roomier, there is a skylight that runs across the ceiling and floods the space with natural light, and also provides a wonderful frame of the night sky.

With two rounded roofs, The Willow’s bulbous frame stands out against the sprawling green lawn where it’s situated. From the outside, The Willow, by Sky Meadow Glamping appears like something straight from a science fiction cartoon, immediately drawing in its guests with its whimsical shape. Placed right in front of the tiny cabin’s wooden deck, two circular windows punctuate The Willow’s front-facing facade and provide unobstructed views of Pembroke’s countryside. Following the larger window inside the tiny cabin, guests are greeted with an open-floor studio layout, featuring a full living area with a television and sofa, a full-sized kitchen and dining area, along with a private bedroom, additional sleeping areas, and bathroom.

The architectural CMF for the Weekend House Nové Hamry by NEW HOME architects has been inspired by the spruce trees that surround it, so there are a lot of shades of gray and dark green. Weekend House Nové Hamry features connection points for solar panels and vertical wind turbines to make it energy self-sufficient. The roof and most of the exterior are covered in a durable, anthracite-colored aluminum cladding. This resembles oiled black wood and adds to the minimal, modern, elegant aesthetic of the cabin. The area gets a lot of heavy snow so to manage the load, the angular design also features a steeply sloped roof. The structure is constructed from cross-laminated timber panels.

Algorithms helped design the shape of this Japanese holiday retreat! Designed for idyllic Hokkaido in Japan, the YEZO is a retreat that uses its dramatic landscape and an experimental design approach to create a sanctuary in nature. The YEZO’s overall design is a fusion of both aesthetics and algorithms, optimized for fabrication from one single mold to minimize ecological impact and reduce manufacturing cost and delivery time. It features a unique curved roof that not only creates a spacious interior but even provides a channel for the central chimney while creating a small terrace/skylight in the process. The wooden roof shell structure, clad with regional black slate, consists of sustainable GluLam (glue-laminated) timber beams suspended from a central concrete chimney. “YEZO’s curved GluLam beams are carefully shaped to operate in pure tension throughout, resulting in weight and material reductions of 90% compared to straight beams”, say Kristof and Julien, the designers behind the award-winning retreat. The YEZO Retreat is a winner of the Golden Pin Design Award for the year 2020.

Imagine a cabin that envelops you in the landscape through its design – that is exactly the feeling Jorge Luis Veliz Quintana envisioned with his cabin design located on the edge of mountains in Cuba! The unique cocoon shape structures are perched on giant boulders and each cabin spans over an area of 150sqm. The curved wooden lattices sit on concrete platforms which match the grey tones of the cliff which makes it seem like the cabin is born out of the rocks itself and is levitating – I absolutely love it when designers pay attention to smaller details in their CMF which makes their concept truly one with the surroundings and it is visually soothing.

ZeroCabin wants to change the habits of its occupants by providing the tools to live sustainably. “It is not about ‘what happens if the water-scarce,’ the questions these days should be ‘if the waters scarce, are my habits according to the water available in the place where I live? If the solar energy is not enough, are my consumption habits according to the energy available?” adds the team when talking about the thought process behind the design. All ZeroCabins regardless of the modality you buy (turnkey or DIY) have a structural base that allows optimal capture of their only two inputs, just like trees: sun and rainwater. The cabin maximizes functionality oversize but includes a wide range of modifications you can do based on the land you want to put it on and as long as it is aligned with their environmental guidelines.

Studio Puisto, a sustainable interior design studio based in Finland, recently debuted the first prototype of cabins soon to be part of a larger hospitality project called Kivijärvi Resort. The resort’s first completed cabin is called Niliaitta, which refers to the traditional storage structure built at the end of a high pillar, used by the Sámi people to store food and equipment, keeping it safe from the grasp of hungry or curious wildlife. In order to immerse guests of Kivijärvi Resort in the elements of nature as safely, but also as close as possible, Studio Puisto installed a floor-to-ceiling window that stands some distance from the cabin’s deep gable roof. From Niliaitta’s front-facing window, guests enjoy the most dominant landscapes as the cabin’s location was purposefully selected to offer the most unobstructed views of Finland’s forest and nearby body of water.

FLEXSE is a prefabricated micro-dwelling solution aka tiny house designed to adapt to ALL seasons, so even if winter wonderland is not your thing, this cabin will certainly be. The cozy modern structure is constructed entirely from 100% recyclable materials and can be assembled in parts on-site or positioned on foundations, allowing it to be set up in remote areas, the countryside, or even on water. Since the construction industry is responsible for more greenhouse gas emissions than aviation (12% vs 2% – can you believe it?), it is wonderful to see an all-season eco-friendly house. The first prototype was a small BBQ shack intended for cooking and then the team made sure it could be tailored for different purposes too – like a sauna, a guest house, a home office, and more. This eventually led to FLEXE being a complete tiny house. One of its most distinct details is the circular window which almost makes the house look like it has the most elegant monocle with a periscope-like view.

OFIS Arhitekti worked with local structural engineers CBD to develop the Kanin Winter Cabin, which is designed to resist extreme weather conditions on its exposed site on Mount Kanin. This tiny 9.7-square-meter cabin has a narrow floor plan containing three shelf-like floors and has dimensions of just 2.4 by 4.9 meters. It is made from a combination of cross-laminated timber, glass, and aluminum panels.

Nestled just 20 minutes from San Miguel de Allende, Mexico (a UNESCO World Heritage Site), Casa Etérea provides breathtaking views of the volcanic and starry landscape. “The vision was to create a theatre to nature, so sustainability was crucial in achieving a truly complete integration with the environment,” explains Ashoka. Not only does the glass and mirror exterior reflect the hillsides and mesquite trees, but a special patterned, ultraviolet coating allows birds to see it as a structure that eliminates the risk of impact. The off-the-grid cabin can host two people comfortably within the 75-square-meter space. It is 100% powered by solar panels and includes all amenities for a comfortable stay like a king-sized bed, a luxurious living space, a kitchen, and laundry facilities.

Dodge Demon and more iconic cars get reinvented with these powerful and transformative makeovers!

Yanko Design’s favorite iconic cars and their equally mesmerizing conceptual renders are here to give you drool-worthy creations! Automotive lovers, trust me, this is one post you do not want to miss!

Dodge Demon is the result of the most passionate motorheads at Dodge, giving it the 840bhp (at 770lb of torque) muscle power that makes even the 707bhp Dodge Hellcat look ordinary. The four-wheeler is packed with power, has an intimidating look to go with it, and yes, Dodge fans absolutely love it. If the Demon wasn’t smokin’ hot enough, automotive concept artist Al Yasid gives it a significant facelift with his tuner kit that literally lends the muscle car a god-like stance! He reimagines the car in white silver body and yellow hue for the front bumper – much like the 68 Porsche 908. The choice of yellow comes from the designer’s current bent towards this color from the palette that he likes the most. With tweaking to the front align with over fenders – who would not fall in love with this muscle car! 

The star of the Back to the Future series is going to shine again, without a doubt. To fuel our imagination and prep us all for the 2021 DeLorean DMC-12, designer Ángel Guerra has awe-inspired automotive design with his version of the DeLorean 2021. He summed up the motivation for this concept in his words – “This is a thank you to an icon and a movie that marked my childhood. This is, too, a new DeLorean for my son’s generation.” As his tribute to the iconic design, Ángel has mustered up this super dope DeLorean for the 40th anniversary of the brand that captured the imagination of an entire generation. The gull-winged car has a lot of character – making it look nothing shy of a supercar of the current generation. Nothing is overdone and every little edge or curve seems well-thought-out. Perhaps, it comes from his culmination of childhood dreams and the subconscious desire to own a DeLorean one day. In fact, his automotive design journey was triggered by the dream-like cars of the 80s and the designs of the following decades.





Maserati and the racing DNA of the luxury carmaker go all the way back to the 1950s in the Grand Prix era. 2020 saw the Italian automaker introduce the halo supercar MC20 and to spice things up designer Salvatoreandrea Piccirillo has come with an electric Gran Turismo supercar concept, he likes to call Maserati Neptune. The designer penned this concept render in collaboration with FCA Group as a part of his training course at IED Transportation Design. The concept borrows the driving position from the 250F Formula One racer and the negative space down the bottom middle is something that’s unique. Maserati Neptune is powered by the Formula E racecar platform with the battery positioned behind the front wheels. The Gran Turismo car has a splitter located at the front and a big diffuser on the rear, giving it a very speed demon-like character. Salvatoreandrea has designed the concept keeping the driving pleasure, sportiness, and comfort in mind – and that’s evident from what we see here.

The Lancia Cargo Stratos, as the concept is called, builds on the Stratos Zero’s wedge design, albeit with a lowered nose to help increase downforce. The concept sports a more streamlined design, embracing curves as well as straight, edgy lines to create something that looks like a wind-tunnel test brought to life. The car’s sides come with continuous metal paneling, hinting at the obvious lack of traditional doors. To enter and exit the vehicle, the windshield opens outwards, revealing the fighter-jet-style 1+1 seater cockpit beneath… just like in the original Stratos Zero. Two headlights sit flush on the car’s surface, right ahead of the fenders, and come fitted with LEDs. The car’s rear comes with linear taillights too, giving off a very cyberpunk vibe.

While it’s not an iconic car design yet, rest assured, the first car made by Apple is sure to gather a cult following by the Apple hardcore fanbase. Adopting Apple’s sharp design aesthetics, the car by Ali Cam looks like a mouse shaped like a car at first glance, but then you realize it’s actually a minimal car concept. Loaded with advanced driving systems Ali envisions the blueprint far in the distant future – the year 2076 to be precise. The choice of year apparently is the 100the anniversary of Apple ever since it was founded by Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Ronald Wayne. On the inside, the Apple Car is more like a luxury lounge with infotainment displays all around (even on the doors), gesture controlled-entertainment systems, and the holographic display traverses the riders into a completely different reality.

For the Viper Basilisk concept, Guillaume took inspiration from the 2nd generation Viper GTS from 1996 and the 3rd generation Viper. Apparently, the design is indicative of the half reptile and half rooster character that’s pretty apparent in the whole thought process behind the concept car. 2nd generation lends the sensual feeling while the 3rd generation has that definitive precision element in the design execution. So, in its design DNA, this Viper Basilisk concept is a ‘Sensual Precision’ of unique design fusion that compares to none. The designer defines it as a precise theme encapsulating the car while the sensual reflections on the bodyside give it that contrasting appeal.

The new breed of supercars might not be that pointy in their looks but still, they have that angular character – the likes of Lamborghini Veneno. Merging the past with the current future of automotive design, artist Ash Thorp and automotive CGI artist colorsponge have joined forces to create a unique concept EV that balances out the best of both worlds. They call it Evinetta, and it’s inspired by the 1970’s Ferrari Berlinetta concept car designed by Pininfarina. The stunning race car is envisioned to be driven by the Tesla Model S powertrain and an active ride suspension. Other bits of the car are adapted from the Porsche RSR – the interior in particular.

In 1970, things were looking up for the company, as design legend Marcello Gandini (head designer at Bertone) unveiled Lancia’s most iconic car… the hyper-sleek Lancia Stratos Zero, an automobile that is considered futuristic even by today’s standards. The Stratos Zero, as iconic and ground-breaking as it was (and the fact that it appeared in Michael Jackson’s Moonwalker video), didn’t give Lancia the thrust it needed to take off. It soon slipped back into its lull, only for Fiat to later announce that Lancia would stop selling cars outside Italy post-2014. Designed by automotive designer and enthusiast, Guilherme Araujo, the Lancia L Concept pays homage to the Stratos Zero on its Golden Jubilee Anniversary. The Lancia L boasts of a similar sleek style, with a wedge-shaped hood. However, it sports air-intakes under the wedge design, allowing the car to both be aesthetically accurate as well as aerodynamic.

Meet the Audi GT concept from UK-based Jordan Gendler… designed to be the modern, Gen-Z soul-child of the TT Quattro and the Rosemeyer concept, the conceptual Audi GT revives a classic, with a makeover fit for the modern age. The Audi GT comes with the same, curve-embracing design that we saw in the TT Quattro, albeit with more sharp, discerning, slim headlamps and taillights, almost echoing the spirit of the year 2020 as opposed to the unabashedly wide-eyed optimism one saw in the 2000s. The silhouette of the GT showcases a great deal of similarity in some regard, embracing similar 3D surfacing to give it a rounded appeal. It even embraces the straight line on the sides stretching from fender to fender, seen on the TT Quattro, reminding us of its heritage.

Boredom and dissatisfaction are two of the biggest drivers for innovation and creativity. Maybe you don’t like something, maybe you have free time on your hands, so you sit and fix stuff and make them better in your own vision. That’s sort of why we’re looking at this absolutely vicious Pagani-on-steroids Batmobile that Encho Enchev designed because he felt the current Batmobile wasn’t intense enough. Designed with edgy body-work, piercing looks, and the classic black design with yellow accents, the Batmobile GT 2020 feels like it could strike fear into the hearts of the toughest criminals (or at least get them to consider an honest living even for a split second). If the edgy, Batarang-on-wheels bodywork doesn’t do it, the pop-out machine guns near the rear wheels should spook even armed bandits… and when justice is restored, the Dark Knight can flee the scene at breakneck speeds, thanks to those three pretty illegal looking afterburners on the rear.

The top 10 cabin designs of February are here to provide the perfect architectural escapism!

Cabin designs are my favorite – there is something undeniably beautiful yet modern in these tiny homes that occupy a tiny part of my heart every time. Be it a traditional A-Frame cabin or a modern AI-enabled cabin design, each unique design is an architectural marvel. I would prefer nothing better than lounging about in a peaceful little cabin tucked away in the middle of the woods. Away from the world, society, and the Internet! It’s a beautiful chance to reconnect with nature, breathe in some fresh oxygen, and simply rejuvenate yourself with a clear mind and even clearer surroundings. I don’t know when I’ll be able to embark on a cabin vacation next, but in anticipation of one, here’s a list of the best cabin designs Yanko Design has seen this February, that are sure to give you the travel bug!

Cube Two is a 263-square-foot home that is designed for the future and smart living. This modern compact home is a prefabricated structure that already comes fitted with the latest home appliances that can all be controlled by an AI assistant named Canny. The exterior has smooth curved corners that give it a friendly vibe and the interior offers enough space for a family of four to live comfortably with two bedrooms and an open living area. To make it feel roomier, there is a skylight that runs across the ceiling and floods the space with natural light, and also provides a wonderful frame of the night sky.

Putting an absolutely new kind of spin on “Home Delivery”, Brette Haus’ prefabricated cabins are literally shipped to your location on the back of a trailer. In a matter of 3 hours, the home is placed on the site, unfolded, and secured in place, turning it from one weird wooden carton into a liveable cabin with anywhere between 22 to 47 sq.ft. of space (depending on the cabin’s variant).

Blackbird is a getaway cabin by STIPFOLD that exists as “a place to be by oneself.” The getaway cabin, an angular structure of black mass combined with tinted glass and a jagged, haphazard display of metal beams, resembles a spaceship that can land in any environment. As conceptualized, Blackbird has landed in a Georgian forest clearing, amidst dense fog and textured pine trees, where it appears right at home. From the outside, below a white, cloudy sky, Blackbird’s asymmetrical frame has a tough exterior constructed from metal to provide a sense of security. Meant to dissolve the barrier between nature and the interior, the tinted glass windows evoke a feeling of privacy, like a lookout that allows its residents to remain hidden while scanning their surroundings.

Studio Puisto, a sustainable interior design studio based in Finland, recently debuted the first prototype of cabins soon to be part of a larger hospitality project called Kivijärvi Resort. The resort’s first completed cabin is called Niliaitta, which refers to the traditional storage structure built at the end of a high pillar, used by the Sámi people to store food and equipment, keeping it safe from the grasp of hungry or curious wildlife. In order to immerse guests of Kivijärvi Resort in the elements of nature as safely, but also as close as possible, Studio Puisto installed a floor-to-ceiling window that stands some distance from the cabin’s deep gable roof. From Niliaitta’s front-facing window, guests enjoy the most dominant landscapes as the cabin’s location was purposefully selected to offer the most unobstructed views of Finland’s forest and nearby body of water.

Algorithms helped design the shape of this Japanese holiday retreat! Designed for idyllic Hokkaido in Japan, the YEZO is a retreat that uses its dramatic landscape and an experimental design approach to create a sanctuary in nature. The YEZO’s overall design is a fusion of both aesthetics and algorithms, optimized for fabrication from one single mold to minimize ecological impact and reduce manufacturing cost and delivery time. It features a unique curved roof that not only creates a spacious interior but even provides a channel for the central chimney while creating a small terrace/skylight in the process. The wooden roof shell structure, clad with regional black slate, consists of sustainable GluLam (glue-laminated) timber beams suspended from a central concrete chimney. “YEZO’s curved GluLam beams are carefully shaped to operate in pure tension throughout, resulting in weight and material reductions of 90% compared to straight beams”, say Kristof and Julien, the designers behind the award-winning retreat. The YEZO Retreat is a winner of the Golden Pin Design Award for the year 2020.

The Mountain Refuge is a wooden, square, prefabricated cabin with an angular roof. While the geometric cabin is a structural contrast to its natural setting, it still blends in well while showing off its modern design. “The project acts as a contemporary interpretation of old traditional mountain refuges, bringing in architectural character and spatial quality,” say the designers. The wooden cabin comes in different modules and each has the capability to be flexible and expandable. It is made to be compact and optimizes the space while taking up the least in nature.

Situated in the Chelav Mountains of Iran’s Mazandaran province sits a beautifully built and serene cabin. Created by Iranian architects Mohammad Hossein Rabbani Zade and Mohammad Mahmoodiye, the structure has been deemed the Lima Cabin. The Lima Cabin and its surrounding mountain landscape is a far cry from the dry, hot, and sandy images of Iran that have been encapsulated in our minds. The architectural escape looks like the perfect vacation getaway, tucked in the midst of trees and lush greenery, promising peace, silence, and a clean break from our bustling everyday lives. Modern, minimal, and clean, the Lima cabin boasts an A-frame structure, although it cannot be compared to the traditional A-frame cabins we are so used to.

Dwelling on Wheels is a 220-square-feet cabin on wheels that buyers can bring with them on the road and situate on coastlines or nearby riverbeds for overnight stays and views. Built to withstand varying climates and temperatures, a steel rib cage and standing seam metal siding wraps around the exterior of DW for a durable and weather-tight finish. Complementing the industrial cottage design, red cedar wood accents warm up the walls, eaves, and even the tiny home’s awning that hangs overhead a durable, ironwood deck, accessible through the dwelling’s double-pane glazed gable door.

Attention all automobile fanatics…and design enthusiasts! If your love for automobiles and architecture has never met before, well they have now in Chris Labrooy’s Winter Cabin. Labrooy wedged the classic Volvo 240 into a quintessential cabin. The Volvo 240 was a vintage wonder, though long and slow, it was considered the ideal family car. Honest and dependable, the 1974’s car became a member of a number of households. Hence it’s no surprise that Labrooy merged it with an adorable little red and white cabin, perfect for those family getaways during the winter vacations. However, Labrooy’s version of the car comprises of two Volvo 240s combined together, creating an inverted mirror image. Slide the structure into a cabin, and you have a quirky architectural concept perfect for all those vintage automobile lovers, who want to take a trip down memory lane!

Meet the Birdbox, a prefabricated shipping container-like cabin by Livit that offers one-of-a-kind escapes to lush destinations surrounded by nature. The cabins are simple, rectangular structures with huge circular and oval windows to give you a larger than life view of nature. Just like the exterior, the interior also has minimal decor which makes for a cozy space with a queen bed and a handful of chairs. The Birdboxes come in two sizes currently – the “Mini” at 10.5’ x 7.2’ x 7.2’ “Mini” and the “Medi” at 16.7’ x 7.87’ x 7.87’.” There’s also a separate “Birdbox Bathroom” which features a black tint one-way glass floor-to-ceiling window.

Boat architect, Kurt Hughes, has designed a tiny home in Central Washington modeled after the lunar lander module and it is truly as close as us civilians can get to having a literal out-of-this-world stay. Hughes handcrafted this tiny home to combine his love for houses and boats, and while we have seen many tiny homes having one that looks like a spaceship capsule is exciting! Why the lunar lander? Because it was a home and a ship. Obviously, it is not as technically complex as a real NASA lunar lander, so living won’t require any special training and it will certainly be more comfortable. Unlike the real Apollo 11 module, this Lunar Lander is very spacious on the inside. The 250 square feet hexagonal pod weighs 3000 pounds and sits on the banks of Columbia river so you have a lot of open ‘space’. There is a small deck for the inhabitants to enjoy the view and Hughes tried to make sure the pod has a minimum impact on the environment around it.

Can’t stop scrolling for more cabin designs? Check out more innovative designs featured on YD here!

10 Women designers with product designs sure to inspire you this International Women’s Day!

#ChooseToChallenge – this is the theme for this year’s celebration of International Women’s Day and I must say this topic boldly echoes the feeling 2021 brings to us – of hope, resilience, and the spirit of challenging for all that is ours! We at Yanko Design have always fought for gender equality in the industrial design industry and to help shine a spotlight on female designers better, we have a dedicated category, titled Womxn Designer, that showcases revolutionary designs by female designers that will surely inspire you. So, the next time someone wishes you a happy women’s day, take a deep breath and let that compliment seep in as a thank you for all the obligations placed on you for being a woman as accept it as a token of the world’s appreciation, after all, it is the women who keep the world going. From all of us at Yanko Design, Happy Women’s Day!

The Elytra table by Radhika Dhumal expands in size by ‘spreading its wings’! The table comes inspired by beetles and the way their wings nest perfectly around their body. The table itself comes with perfectly natural bug-like proportions that fit in well as garden decor and uses two ‘wings’ to expand in the surface, much like the beetle. Elytra’s design is dominated by rounded forms that give it a friendly, pet-like demeanor and feature four legs that are positioned in a way that gives the Elytra its unique, animalistic stance.

DUNSTA was designed by Alexandra Fransson to bring the age-old tradition of storing fresh produce in a natural way while being aligned with your modern lifestyle. It uses evaporative cooling to create an environment similar to that of the root cellar, but for an urban living arrangement – so your fruits and vegetables will stay crispy and fresh longer without needing electricity!

Patchwork is Giulia and Ruggero’s proposed creative design solution for depersonalized home spaces such as reception centers for unhoused individuals. Patchwork is comprised of different, interchangeable panels that fold and expand like a traditional room divider. Patchwork panels provide plenty of different uses for each individual and function as a typical divider, work station, headboard, or some combination from the above. Patchwork incorporates a built-in closet space where users can hang their clothes and, thanks to a concealed padlock accessory, can also stow away personal possessions for secure storage. Patchwork also comes with supplemental shelving units, individual mirrors, and handy hooks so that the additional panels can be outfitted according to each user’s unique needs.

The Blue Box – a tiny at-home device that could detect breast cancer with 95% accuracy by just scanning a urine sample. “A household owning The Blue Box can have all its female members tested at their desired frequency and convenience. After creating a profile at The Blue App, the user just needs to collect some urine in a plastic container and subsequently place it inside The Blue Box”, says Judit Giró Benet, a biomedical engineering student who then went on to found her own company to help develop this technology. The Blue Box uses a proprietary set of cloud-based AI-based algorithms that react to specific urine metabolites, delivering results that are up to 95% accurate!

Using a non-ergonomic mouse, Somya Chowdhary mapped out all the pain points felt on the hand. The process then involved clay modeling to understand how MAUS’ shape and angle would feel with wrist movements and grip. Prototypes were then 3D printed with the final form that ensured the hand stays in a position of rest even when using the mouse. An interesting functionality to cure repetitive strain syndrome was making all controls gesture-based. MAUS also features a digital display – something we haven’t seen in any mice! The body also features Alacantara fabric for a soft touch and comfortable light grip. It has a soft felt base as well as a rubber grip for smooth motions.

Inspired by a recent viewing of a solar eclipse, Adi Goodrich designed Eclipse Booths to offer a photo-visual experience for Instagram users to immerse their grids in the cosmos. Describing the booths in her own words, Goodrich says, “Lit from behind, the round portion of the booth emits a soft, indirect light. The mirrors on the ceiling extend the graphic steps throughout the booth’s interior to allude to… steps leading into eternity.” While one of the booths embodies the night sky with a darker color palette of twilight purple and midnight blue, a cooler, icy light emanates from behind the round plate – mimicking the Moon moving into the Earth’s shadow.

Australian designer Amelia Henderson-Pitman looked within her own country and found that there are more than 1700 species of native bee in Australia, yet only 11 species living in hives and producing honey. Keeping this in mind, she designed Pollen – a modular system that provides a range of nesting materials to support the native bee populations. Pollen can be installed in any location and has also been optimized for small spaces to keep it city-friendly. The idea was to have a modular system that could be integrated anywhere from inner-city gardens to exterior building structures. Pollen is basically The Good Place neighborhood for bees. Each nest module contains a variety of materials like recycled hardwood, sustainable bamboo, or handmade mud brick. They also have a series of holes that vary in diameter to provide nesting locations for bees. The shell of the modules is an injection tube crafted from recycled HDPE and has been designed to be easily assembled as well as mounted without fixtures. I love that the internal modules (molded from recycled PET) are transparent because it offers us a closer look at how the bees are adapting. The transparency of the design shows us that seeing is bee-lieving!

Designed by Jihyun Han, Gosewalk consists of two toy pieces, a multi-surfaced mat that resembles the different terrain found outdoors, and a silicone puzzle that stows away dog treats for your pup to sniff and find. The multi-surfaced mat brings the outdoors to your dog with different fabrics resembling different terrains. Twisted and shaggy polyester mimics the look and feel of grass, while tan corduroy and water-repellant canvas brings the colors of sand and soil to your dog’s snout. Pockets and flaps line the mat’s fabrics and provide perfect hiding places for treats and mixtures of herbs and scents to entertain your pup. The silicone puzzle, which seems to be a smaller, more portable companion piece to the bulkier mat, resembles the look of grass through its tender, spring green silicone nubs that grid the toy.

Revolutionizing how Type 1 Diabetics monitor their blood glucose levels, the Sense Glucose Earring by Tyra Kozlow is an innovative non-invasive wearable that incorporates reads blood-sugar levels in the ear-lobe using safe, high-frequency radio waves. The earring requires just a single lobe piercing (as opposed to the daily pin-prick tests that diabetes patients have to take) and sits on the ear at all times. When you need to read your blood-sugar levels, the earring uses sensors and algorithms to collect data, which is then sent to your smartphone. This massively reduces medical waste, while offering a pain-free solution for checking your sugar levels. At the same time, it turns a medical apparatus into a fashion wearable.

Aditi Kedia’s Prairie Planter reinterprets these containers as landscape-elements in their own right. Designed to look almost like an abstraction of a prairie-grassland landscape, the modular planters stack over one another, resembling mounds of red soil. When paired with succulents or cacti, the Prairie Planters come to life, looking a lot like a savannah landscape! “By adjusting each unit in different orientations, one can play with the shape and placement. The design takes inspiration from how things in nature grow on uneven, unexpected surfaces”, says Aditi, who designed the planters as a part of an Instagram-based design challenge.