The Morning After: 20 years of Engadget

This website first began on March 2, 2004. It’s older than YouTube, the iPhone, Uber, Tesla cars, Spotify and a whole lot more. It’s even roughly a month older than the word ‘podcast.’

To mark the 20th anniversary of Engadget, we’re taking a longer look at how the tech industry has changed over the past two decades. First up: streaming.

We were going to kick things off with a letter from the editor, but two weeks ago, Engadget’s parent company laid off many editors, writers and videographers from our small team, including our editor-in-chief, Dana Wollman.

As Aaron Souppouris puts in his introduction to the series, it’s not “business as usual,” but we are committed to pushing Engadget forward. What started as a grass-roots tech blog has now morphed into a media organization “aiming to break news, give no-BS buying advice and highlight the stories in tech that matter.”

Oh, and we have a podcast.

— Mat Smith

The biggest stories you might have missed

Dune 2 kicks butt (literally)

This is what it looks like to reenter Earth’s atmosphere from a space capsule’s POV

Streaming video changed the internet forever

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No, Mark Zuckerberg isn’t having a ‘PR moment’

Meta has rarely been in so much hot water.

TMA
Tom Williams via Getty Images

Axios, a site known for political analysis (and extensive use of bullet points), has joined the ranks of pundits fawning over Mark Zuckerberg’s PR strategy. The Meta CEO, they claim, is (as originally headlined) “having a PR moment.” Should anyone be praising the PR strategy of a gigantic company credibly accused of enabling a variety of mass-scale harm? Even if that PR strategy was working — which it isn’t.

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Apple might announce new iPads, M3 MacBook Airs very soon

No spring event?

In Bloomberg’s Power On newsletter, Mark Gurman says Apple plans to announce several new products in a series of “online videos and marketing campaigns” pretty much imminently. If so, that’d be two years in a row Apple has passed on a spring event. This year, it could be particularly busy: Along with an iPad Pro refresh and a new 12.9-inch iPad Air, Gurman reports that Apple is planning to announce new Apple Pencils and Magic Keyboards. (Likely with USB-C.) It’s also expected to release the M3 MacBook Air in 13- and 15-inch models.

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Waymo gets approval to deploy its robotaxi service in Los Angeles

Despite the company getting suspended in February.

The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) has permitted Waymo to expand its robotaxi operations to Los Angeles and more locations in the San Francisco Peninsula despite opposition from local groups and government agencies. In the CPUC’s decision, it admitted receiving letters of protest from the Los Angeles Department of Transportation, the San Francisco County Transportation Authority and the San Francisco Taxi Workers Alliance about Waymo’s expansion.

Following an incident where two of its robotaxis collided with a backward-facing pickup truck, the agency suspended Waymo’s expansion efforts in February for up to 120 days. Waymo spokesperson Julia Ilina said in a statement to Wired that the company will take an “incremental approach” when deploying the service in LA.

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This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/the-morning-after-20-years-of-engadget-121611170.html?src=rss

Apple may skip a spring event and announce new iPads, M3 MacBook Airs online instead

Apple is expected to have some big releases coming up soon — including new iPad Pro and iPad Air models, and the M3 MacBook Air — but it’s reportedly not going to host a big spring launch event for the announcements. In the Power On newsletter, Mark Gurman reports that Apple is “planning to announce the new products on its website with a series of online videos and marketing campaigns.” If so, that’d be two years in a row that Apple has passed on a spring event, with this year being particularly stacked with new products.

Whatever format the announcements come in, rumors suggest they’ll be happening imminently. Gurman, however, predicts more conservatively that the hardware drop will come either this month or next. Along with the iPad Pro refresh and a new 12.9-inch iPad Air, Gurman reports that Apple is planning to announce new Apple Pencils and Magic Keyboards. It’s also expected to release the M3 MacBook Air in 13-inch and 15-inch models.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/apple-may-skip-a-spring-event-and-announce-new-ipads-m3-macbook-airs-online-instead-211706684.html?src=rss

Apple may skip a spring event and announce new iPads, M3 MacBook Airs online instead

Apple is expected to have some big releases coming up soon — including new iPad Pro and iPad Air models, and the M3 MacBook Air — but it’s reportedly not going to host a big spring launch event for the announcements. In the Power On newsletter, Mark Gurman reports that Apple is “planning to announce the new products on its website with a series of online videos and marketing campaigns.” If so, that’d be two years in a row that Apple has passed on a spring event, with this year being particularly stacked with new products.

Whatever format the announcements come in, rumors suggest they’ll be happening imminently. Gurman, however, predicts more conservatively that the hardware drop will come either this month or next. Along with the iPad Pro refresh and a new 12.9-inch iPad Air, Gurman reports that Apple is planning to announce new Apple Pencils and Magic Keyboards. It’s also expected to release the M3 MacBook Air in 13-inch and 15-inch models.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/apple-may-skip-a-spring-event-and-announce-new-ipads-m3-macbook-airs-online-instead-211706684.html?src=rss

Proposed class action lawsuit accuses Apple of monopolizing cloud storage for its devices

A class action complaint filed against Apple on Friday in the northern California court has accused the company of creating unfair conditions to ensure iCloud remains the dominant cloud storage choice for its devices, according to Bloomberg Law. By placing “surgical technological restraints” on the types of files other cloud providers can host, Apple has made it so only iCloud can offer Apple device users full-service storage, the complaint argues. According to the complaint, this has also allowed Apple to charge higher fees in the absence of “any real threat to iCloud’s dominance.”

The proposed class, represented by Hagens Berman, would cover tens of millions of customers in the US, Bloomberg Law notes. While iPhone and iPad users do have the option to store certain types of files with non-Apple cloud storage providers, there are some things — including app data and device settings — that only iCloud has permission to host. This leaves users to choose either the “unattractive” option of juggling multiple cloud storage accounts to fully cover their backup needs, or iCloud’s full-service convenience. The complaint argues that Apple’s restrictions are arbitrary and work to stifle competition.

Apple “does not dominate because it built a superior cloud-storage product,” the complaint states. “From a security and functionality standpoint, iCloud is no better (and often inferior) to other cloud storage platforms. Instead, Apple has achieved market dominance by rigging the competitive playing field so that only iCloud can win.” The case was only just filed and hasn’t yet been granted class action status, but anyone who thinks they may be eligible to get in on it can fill out a form on the Hagens Berman website to find out more information.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/proposed-class-action-lawsuit-accuses-apple-of-monopolizing-cloud-storage-for-its-devices-190822242.html?src=rss

Proposed class action lawsuit accuses Apple of monopolizing cloud storage for its devices

A class action complaint filed against Apple on Friday in the northern California court has accused the company of creating unfair conditions to ensure iCloud remains the dominant cloud storage choice for its devices, according to Bloomberg Law. By placing “surgical technological restraints” on the types of files other cloud providers can host, Apple has made it so only iCloud can offer Apple device users full-service storage, the complaint argues. According to the complaint, this has also allowed Apple to charge higher fees in the absence of “any real threat to iCloud’s dominance.”

The proposed class, represented by Hagens Berman, would cover tens of millions of customers in the US, Bloomberg Law notes. While iPhone and iPad users do have the option to store certain types of files with non-Apple cloud storage providers, there are some things — including app data and device settings — that only iCloud has permission to host. This leaves users to choose either the “unattractive” option of juggling multiple cloud storage accounts to fully cover their backup needs, or iCloud’s full-service convenience. The complaint argues that Apple’s restrictions are arbitrary and work to stifle competition.

Apple “does not dominate because it built a superior cloud-storage product,” the complaint states. “From a security and functionality standpoint, iCloud is no better (and often inferior) to other cloud storage platforms. Instead, Apple has achieved market dominance by rigging the competitive playing field so that only iCloud can win.” The case was only just filed and hasn’t yet been granted class action status, but anyone who thinks they may be eligible to get in on it can fill out a form on the Hagens Berman website to find out more information.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/proposed-class-action-lawsuit-accuses-apple-of-monopolizing-cloud-storage-for-its-devices-190822242.html?src=rss

A two-pack of Sonos Era 100 smart speakers is $88 off right now

A two-pack of Sonos Era 100 wireless smart speakers is currently going for one of the best prices we’ve seen since the holiday season on Woot. You can get two of the speakers for $410, or $88 off the normal price. That’s almost as low as the Black Friday price from last year, when the Sonos Era 100 speaker dropped to an individual price of $199. If you’re looking for some decent midrange speakers to upgrade your home audio setup, the Sonos Era 100 is a solid option, especially at an 18 percent discount.

The Sonos Era 100 was released last year as the successor to the Sonos One, and it brought a lot of improvements. It packs two tweeters and a bigger woofer than the Sonos One, making for high quality sound. The Sonos Era 100 is our choice for the best midrange smart speaker of the moment thanks to its impressive sound quality and features like Trueplay tuning, which Sonos made even better with this model. The Era 100 uses its built-in mics to tune itself for the optimal output for its location.

With the Era 100, you also have the option to manually connect a device to the speaker via its USB-C port. Unfortunately, you’ll most likely need an adapter to connect something like a turntable, but it’s still nice to have the line-in option (the Sonos One did not). If you’re hoping to use a voice assistant with the Era 100, you should know it’s best suited for people working with the Alexa ecosystem. The speaker supports Alexa and Sonos’ own voice assistant, but it does not work with Google Assistant.

The Sonos Era 100 is a good choice for multi-room audio or a home theater setup, and can be coupled with a soundbar for an even better experience. It also has better on-device controls compared to the Sonos One, and a physical mic switch for when you want to be sure it’s not listening.

Follow @EngadgetDeals on Twitter and subscribe to the Engadget Deals newsletter for the latest tech deals and buying advice.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/a-two-pack-of-sonos-era-100-smart-speakers-is-88-off-right-now-161512036.html?src=rss

A two-pack of Sonos Era 100 smart speakers is $88 off right now

A two-pack of Sonos Era 100 wireless smart speakers is currently going for one of the best prices we’ve seen since the holiday season on Woot. You can get two of the speakers for $410, or $88 off the normal price. That’s almost as low as the Black Friday price from last year, when the Sonos Era 100 speaker dropped to an individual price of $199. If you’re looking for some decent midrange speakers to upgrade your home audio setup, the Sonos Era 100 is a solid option, especially at an 18 percent discount.

The Sonos Era 100 was released last year as the successor to the Sonos One, and it brought a lot of improvements. It packs two tweeters and a bigger woofer than the Sonos One, making for high quality sound. The Sonos Era 100 is our choice for the best midrange smart speaker of the moment thanks to its impressive sound quality and features like Trueplay tuning, which Sonos made even better with this model. The Era 100 uses its built-in mics to tune itself for the optimal output for its location.

With the Era 100, you also have the option to manually connect a device to the speaker via its USB-C port. Unfortunately, you’ll most likely need an adapter to connect something like a turntable, but it’s still nice to have the line-in option (the Sonos One did not). If you’re hoping to use a voice assistant with the Era 100, you should know it’s best suited for people working with the Alexa ecosystem. The speaker supports Alexa and Sonos’ own voice assistant, but it does not work with Google Assistant.

The Sonos Era 100 is a good choice for multi-room audio or a home theater setup, and can be coupled with a soundbar for an even better experience. It also has better on-device controls compared to the Sonos One, and a physical mic switch for when you want to be sure it’s not listening.

Follow @EngadgetDeals on Twitter and subscribe to the Engadget Deals newsletter for the latest tech deals and buying advice.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/a-two-pack-of-sonos-era-100-smart-speakers-is-88-off-right-now-161512036.html?src=rss

The Morning After: Lenovo’s sci-fi see-through laptop, Nintendo versus emulators and more

We're back, having had to say goodbye and part with some great coworkers friends here at Engadget last week. Since then, we've covered everything at note at MWC 2024, including some sci-fi-level concepts from Lenovo that may never make it to stores but can still, well, hold our desensitized tech journalist's attention. Meanwhile, Nintendo is, once again, taking emulators and pirates to task in the courts. But this time could prove crucial for the future of emulators. A reminder: Nintendo's new console is set to launch in 2025. Coming up next week, Engadget's 20th anniversary. We're older than YouTube!

This week:

💻🛸: Lenovo’s concept laptop looks like a Star Trek prop:

🏴‍☠️🎮: Nintendo steps up its fight against game piracy:

💃📞: The Barbie phone debuts at MWC 2024

Read this:

I write reviews too! Final Fantasy 7 Rebirth takes the characters and world reintroduced with Remake and does a better job at scaling it all up. Instead of playing in a single city, this time, it’s a world tour. There’s also an expanded roster of playable characters, almost doubling Remake’s total. But there's only one big question: Does Aerith survive?

Like email more than video? Subscribe right here for daily reports, direct to your inbox.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/the-morning-after-lenovos-sci-fi-see-through-laptop-nintendo-versus-emulators-and-more-160031142.html?src=rss

The Morning After: Lenovo’s sci-fi see-through laptop, Nintendo versus emulators and more

We're back, having had to say goodbye and part with some great coworkers friends here at Engadget last week. Since then, we've covered everything at note at MWC 2024, including some sci-fi-level concepts from Lenovo that may never make it to stores but can still, well, hold our desensitized tech journalist's attention. Meanwhile, Nintendo is, once again, taking emulators and pirates to task in the courts. But this time could prove crucial for the future of emulators. A reminder: Nintendo's new console is set to launch in 2025. Coming up next week, Engadget's 20th anniversary. We're older than YouTube!

This week:

💻🛸: Lenovo’s concept laptop looks like a Star Trek prop:

🏴‍☠️🎮: Nintendo steps up its fight against game piracy:

💃📞: The Barbie phone debuts at MWC 2024

Read this:

I write reviews too! Final Fantasy 7 Rebirth takes the characters and world reintroduced with Remake and does a better job at scaling it all up. Instead of playing in a single city, this time, it’s a world tour. There’s also an expanded roster of playable characters, almost doubling Remake’s total. But there's only one big question: Does Aerith survive?

Like email more than video? Subscribe right here for daily reports, direct to your inbox.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/the-morning-after-lenovos-sci-fi-see-through-laptop-nintendo-versus-emulators-and-more-160031142.html?src=rss

This is what it looks like to reenter Earth’s atmosphere from a space capsule’s POV

Incredible footage released by Varda Space Industries gives us a first-person view of a space capsule’s return trip to Earth, from the moment it separates from its carrier satellite in orbit all the way through its fiery reentry and bumpy arrival at the surface. Varda’s W-1 capsule landed at the Utah Test and Training Range, a military site, on February 21 in a first for a commercial company. It spent roughly eight months leading up to that in low Earth orbit, stuck in regulatory limbo while the company waited for the government approvals it needed to land on US soil, according to Ars Technica.

“Here's a video of our capsule ripping through the atmosphere at mach 25, no renders, raw footage,” the company posted on X alongside clips from reentry. Varda also shared a 28-minute video of W-1’s full journey home from LEO on YouTube.

Varda, which worked with Rocket Lab for the mission, is trying to develop mini-labs that can produce pharmaceuticals in orbit — in this case, the HIV drug ritonavir. Its W-1 capsule was attached to Rocket Lab’s Photon satellite “bus,” which the company said ahead of launch would provide power, communications and altitude control for the capsule. Photon successfully brought the capsule to where it needed to be for last week’s reentry, then itself burned up in Earth’s atmosphere, SpaceNews reported. Now that the capsule has returned, Ars Technica reports that the ritonavir crystals grown in orbit will be analyzed by the Indiana-based pharmaceutical company, Improved Pharma.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/this-is-what-it-looks-like-to-reenter-earths-atmosphere-from-a-space-capsules-pov-211120769.html?src=rss