Braun wireless earbuds for audiophiles who value wearing comfort and style

Choosing a pair of good-sounding earbuds which have great comfort, ANC and styling are not easy when options are virtually limitless. Can a pair of Braun earbuds simplify that dilemma? A designer indeed thinks so with this interesting concept.

The wireless earbuds market is flooded with wireless earbuds, but only a few can really claim to be worth their weight in gold. After all, appealing to audio lovers’ tastes is not easy even though creating wireless earbuds seems like a run-of-the-mill task by the look of things. The likes of Sony WF-1000XM4, Bose QuietComfort, Apple AirPods Pro and now the Nothing ear (1) earbuds – all are great choices for ones who demand great sound isolation, crisp audio, comfort and style.

Designer: Ye Hongting (葉 泓廷)

Braun is known for its high-quality grooming products and innovative product design, so why not have a great pair of wireless earbuds too? Even though the German company would think twice before branching out into the highly competitive wireless earbuds space, the low barrier entry-level makes for a compelling case. This concept evokes that vision with a sublime design and the Braun DNA deep embedded in the roots.

The earbuds have a rather unique and attractive form that doesn’t compromise on wearing comfort by any stretch of the imagination. Matte black or white-colored housing with the hint of Braun’s signature color green is the USP of the design. The silicone ear tips match the matte look, and the charging case carries the same theme. It’s all matte black with a yellow button on the front. Wait till you glance over the top of the earbuds which have the Braun’s well-known patterned shape.

Touch controls on the earbuds allow for a seamless audio listening experience – be it high fidelity music or engaging podcasts on the go. Active noise cancellation is also standard with three microphones in each earbud zoning out the world when needed. In the audio accessories space dominated by similar-looking designs, the Braun What if Earbud spices things up for demanding audiophiles.

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Braun mouse swivels on its tilted base for ergonomic right or left handed use

A highly ergonomic mouse design that is perfectly suited for any-handed use, thus making it ideal for professionals and gamers alike.

Most of the mouse are designed for right-handed users while the left-handed mouse is lesser in comparison. Still, left-handed users have some good choices to go for like Logitech G903, Razer Naga or Corsair M55 RGB. On the other end of the spectrum, ambidextrous mouse options including Logitech G Pro, SteelSeries Sensei Ten or Razer Viper have also claimed a good bite of the market. They are quite popular among left-handed users, and gamers too.

Designer: 葉 泓廷

Any mouse you choose, the setup is best tailored for either left-handed, right-handed – or slightly better configurations for particular-handed use, however, none of them can claim to be perfect for any kind of use-case-scenarios. This calls for a peripheral that boasts a smart design to make the switch from a predominately right-handed ergonomic use to the left-handed one in a jiffy.

Meet the Braun Ergonomic Mouse designed for both left and right-handed use in equal capacity. Unlike an ambidextrous mouse, this one completely changes its tilt and base depending on the preferred hand. So, you could be playing Battlefield with your right-handed configuration, and shift to a left-handed setup if your left-handed sibling wants to use the accessory. Simple manipulation of the form provides an equally good ergonomic grip for both-handed configurations.

The clever design makes use of a tilted sloped base swiveling at the center. As the base rotates it shifts between the two modes. This allows for a seamless transition between the desired-handed modes without compromising even a little bit on the hand posture position. Like a couple of other off-beat Braun designs. This one too carries the black or white-dominated theme with the inclusion of signature Braun colors for the buttons and scroll mouse.

Carrying the Braun branding is a bit off-beat, but then, that’s what we come to expect from concept designs which sow the seed of imagination for future designs. The otherwise household appliance giant foraying into computer peripherals looks highly unlikely, but hey, it’s still in the blueprint and early prototype stage, right?

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Braun “What if Phone” checks all the boxes for a likeable rugged design

Rugged phones are on the top of the list of people who are in professions that carry the risk of device damage, and thankfully, there are some good options on the market. So, how about having a newbie in this niche segment with a very measured design that could win hearts?

Smartphones of today are sleek gadgets with bezel-less screens and slim form factor to go with our stylish lifestyle. The evolution from a monochrome screen with thick bezels and a fat body into the current shape has been rather mind-boggling with the next big avenue being the folding and rollable phones. In this landscape, a designer imagines a smartphone by Braun, a company only known for its industrial product designs from the mid-20th century with chart-topping products including electric shavers and record players.

Designer: 葉 泓廷

If ever Braun was to jump into the consumer electronics market with its own smartphone, then the device for sure is going to be rugged and built to last a lifetime. Taking a detour from their current product line looks highly improbable, but in the concept design world, anything is possible. I see the Braun What if Phone taking on the likes of Doogee, CAT, Blackview or Ulefone. The USP here is the more compact design in a very slim chassis. While all the other market-leading options for rugged phones look more like an armored vehicle, this one maintains its thin style quo.

The thick bezels on the top and bottom of the screen are old school, and by common knowledge will only appeal to a certain niche section of the market. Although that doesn’t take away its persona as a minimalistic device, just like the iPhone SE. One unique feature that instantly caught my eye is the hybrid shape, wherein, the top has slightly edgy corners, and the bottom has the typical iPhone 13 contour.  The designer imagines the Braun phone to be draped in white, black and silver-colored hues.

The speakers are positioned at the front bottom section alongside the fingerprint scanner which lies outside the screen area. The same goes with the selfie camera which is positioned at the top middle. Moving on to the rear, the industrial design takes precedence with the riveted back and that peculiar dual camera lens setup. This brings in a robust character both visually and functionally. On the sides, the yellow power button and the green volume rocker buttons on the other side add a bit of zing to the overall balanced design of this phone.

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Braun Series 9 Pro Foil Electric Shaver Review

Technology is meant to make our lives simpler, easier, and more convenient. That is true for the complex computers in our pockets to the mundane electrical products scattered around our homes. Electric shavers are probably some of the last things you’d consider to be technological innovations, but every new generation does try to add a little something new that tries to help us free up time for the more important things in life. Braun’s new Series 9 Pro electric shaver is one such example, and we give it a few tries to see if those incremental improvements do add up.

Aesthetics

As the name suggests, the Braun Series 9 Pro builds upon an older base model, one that was launched six years ago. The electric shaver company hasn’t exactly been sitting on its during that period but had released other incremental upgrades to the Series 9 foil shavers. The Braun Series 9 Pro may sound like the culmination of those improvements, but it’s easy enough to mistake it for its predecessors because of how they all look eerily similar.

Granted, electric shavers of this type tend to share the same basic design, and the Series 9 Pro is definitely not an outlier. Like many of its kind, its design is utilitarian rather than aesthetic, putting a heavier emphasis on handling and ergonomics rather than looks. Since a shaver is something you’ll hold for minutes on end, often a few times a week, comfort is definitely near the top of the list, with safety and performance being the greatest concern.

To that extent, it’s not really surprising that the majority of the Braun Series 9 Pro is made of plastic that’s painted to look like polished metal. Although definitely not environment-friendly nor sustainable, aluminum would have made the shaver too heavy. The plastic coating, however, is a fingerprint magnet, and you might lose a lot of time trying to make it look pristine after every use. Unlike the chrome finish on the front, the Series 9 Pro’s back is covered with a dimpled rubber material that is clearly more for ergonomics than looks.

The electric shaver doesn’t have many design elements to distract the user from its intended purpose. Aside from the large shaver head, the only other part that really calls your attention is the textured thumb rest in the middle, with a “PrecisionLock” switch and the power button below it. There’s also an LED screen for the battery and travel lock indicators, but don’t expect a high-quality display. In fact, you might even notice a bit of backlight bleeding around the icons.

The Braun Series 9 Pro comes with a 5-in-1 SmartCare Center “dock” and, depending on the actual model, a PowerCase with a built-in battery. The latter makes this travel case less conducive for travel, making the mostly plastic case heavier than it looks. The SmartCare station follows the Series 9 Pro’s very basic design, with a single power button as its only user interface.

Ergonomics

As a product that’s meant to be held with one hand for slightly longer periods of time and multiple days a week, Braun designed its Series 9 shavers to be comfortable to use. The choice of lightweight plastic materials and the rubber cover on the back work towards that end, but they thankfully don’t cheapen the feel of the device. The Series 9 Pro feels solid and durable, designed to face the wear and tear of semi-daily use.

The contours of the electric shaver let most hands grasp the body firmly, but it’s the rubber back and the textured thumb rest that really gives you a grip on it. The lack of a cord dangling out of the shaver’s body definitely adds to its usability. In fact, you can’t even use it while it’s plugged in, so you have to be sure there’s enough charge remaining for your use.

While the head can only move back and forth, the four cutting foils can each move independently, depending on the pressure applied and the surface they’re moving on. Together, this range of motions allows the Braun Series 9 Pro to smoothly move on almost any surface of your head, including your scalp. But in case you prefer having more direct control over the head’s movement, the PrecisionLock below the thumb rest can keep the head still while still letting the foils move on their own.

The Braun Series 9 Pro, just like its predecessors, is clearly designed for ease of use, but one particular part of it seems to stick out like a sore thumb, almost literally. The shaver hides a “precision trimmer” that slides out from its bottom that’s meant to be used for trimming beards. Unfortunately, its location makes it a bit awkward to use in its default position, forcing you to turn the shaver upside-down instead. It doesn’t work that well, either, so it might be the most underutilized part of the shaver anyway.

Sustainability

There is a growing trend among some consumer electronics manufacturers, including smartphone makers, where sustainability or at least eco-friendliness has become an advertising point. Although they can’t completely do away with some materials, they try to at least reduce their use, especially in packaging. Braun, unfortunately, isn’t there yet, and the Series 9 Pro definitely won’t score marks in this department.

The use of plastics and rubber might be understandable, at least given the limits of today’s materials, but the company could have still taken small steps towards reducing waste. One example is the charging cable, which uses Braun’s two-pronged connector. Given the aim of portability, it could have taken the opportunity to adopt USB-C since many people today have phones that charge over that standard. That said, it does have the advantage that you can use new accessories like the PowerCase with older Series 9 shaver models that use the same proprietary connector, saving you the expense and hassle of buying a new cord if you already have one.

Like traditional consumer electronics, Braun didn’t build its shavers with self-repair in mind. None of its shavers are easily repairable, and the only replaceable parts are the cassette holding the cutting elements and the head itself. Once broken or worn down, there is no room for repairs, and these have to be thrown out. Braun doesn’t have any guidance or system for recycling these parts either, which could have gone a long way in getting the company started in a more sustainable direction.

Performance

The Braun Series 9 Pro closely resembles the rest of its family in both design and function, but the biggest upgrade it got is one you can only see and feel after using it regularly for a while. Braun is advertising a new 4+1 Shaving Elements and a “ProLift Trimmer” that’s meant to catch long and hard-to-reach hairs, or at least that’s the theory. In practice, it gets close but not close enough.

The Series 9 Pro generally works well and gives a close shave, managing longer hairs that have grown for as long as seven days. It’s no magic wand that will make your facial hair disappear with one flick, though. You might have to do a few passes in areas like the neck. And despite the flexibility of motion, getting to those hairs under the nose can get a bit tricky, too.

Part of the Series 9 Pro’s trick is its powerful motors, but that increased power does come at some price. Although not unbearably loud, the shaver still produces enough audible noise to call attention to it or, worse, wake someone up. The shaver could also sometimes feel a bit rougher on your skin, though not enough to produce discomfort or irritation unless you have extremely sensitive skin. There’s a tendency, unfortunately, to have the occasional pinched skin or get a long hair snagged.

Braun advertises about 60 minutes of use with a full battery, and it’s pretty much on point in that estimate. Charging the shaver, on the other hand, takes a good 50 minutes to full. And that’s when the Series 9 Pro is plugged directly. The PowerCase almost doubles its battery life but naturally charges a lot slower. The SmartCare Center also charges the shaver, but only when it’s not cleaning it.

That “dock” is actually one of the biggest highlights of the Series 9 shavers and is what makes this particular family easy to use and maintain. Simply plopping the Series 9 Pro in its “cradle” and pressing the power button initiates not only a cleaning process but also a lubrication session. Of course, you can clean the shaver manually and might want to do a thorough cleaning from time to time, but this worry-free maintenance definitely takes some burden off owners’ shoulders.

Value

At $349.99, the Braun Series 9 Pro is one of the more expensive electric shaves in the market; there’s just no escaping that fact. It doesn’t have one killer feature that easily makes it stand out, but it’s the sum of its parts that can justify its price. Fortunately, there are also other aspects that help soften the blow, but it’s still a bitter pill to swallow in the end.

There is, for example, an option to buy one without the PowerCase, but that only saves you $20. Braun’s Series 9 accessories and parts are also mostly interchangeable and backward compatible, so you can at least stop worrying about your shaver being obsolete when the next Series 9 model appears. It definitely feels more like a long-term investment rather than a regular purchase, and hopefully, the shaver will last as long as you need it, at least until Braun launches the Series 10 in a few years.

Verdict

Electric shavers are almost a dime a dozen these days, but not many have been able to really deliver on the promise of a quick but close shave. Braun has been at it for years, especially with the Series 9, and the Series 9 Pro, in particular, tries to combine all those lessons learned into a single package. It definitely comes close but also comes up short in a few places as well.

Its powerful motor and new head design definitely get close and personal with longer hair, but you’ll still need more than just a few passes to weed out the more stubborn ones. Its power comes with a bit of roughness, but the real cost is in the literal price. Even Braun’s older Series 9 shavers could offer close to the same performance for less.

As far as product design goes, however, the Series 9 Pro doesn’t exactly offer anything innovative or exciting. Its use of light but durable plastic and grippy rubber is a standard among electric shavers, though it tries to add a bit of glamor with some silver coating, a few gold accents, and an ergonomic shape. It’s durable to boot, and its SmartCare Center dock helps make sure it will last longer, which is for the best since there’s very little in the Braun Series 9 Pro that’s built to last or be easily replaced and recycled.

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Braun Motorbike exudes profound historic association + modern influence of brand’s greatest creations

Any kind of association between German consumer product giant Braun and superbikes seems like an odd proposition, but not in the concept design world. Automotive designer Víctor Groten Rico proves that right with his off-beat motorbike concept draped in the iconic consumer brand’s spicy flavor!

The futuristic-looking bike doesn’t just have the Braun namesake but also carries the brand’s century of design philosophy that’s brought eye candy, functional solutions to our needs. In fact, for the 100 glorious years of the brand, late iconic designer Virgil Abloh teamed up with Braun to create a reinterpretation of the 1965 Wandanlage hi-fi audio wall unit.

This sleek bike perhaps is also a tribute to the famous brand’s unperturbed legacy. Those smooth-flowing lines perfectly balanced out with the voluptuous contours, right from the front section to the rear remind me of the Series 9 Shaver and a hint of the Satin Hair 7 HD785 hairdryer is also apparent. The color scheme and the contours look adapted from the Sixtant SM31 Shaver from 1962. The initial sketches derive inspiration from the famous Dieter Rams designs that shaped the yesteryears in more ways than not, for example, the 1959 TP1 Record Player or the KF 20 coffee maker.

The body of the Braun Motorbike has two definitive sections when viewed from the side profile. Everything here is in unison, right from the integrated handlebars and seating to the swingarms and the big wheels. The ultra-futuristic heads-up-display sitting on the fat tank area is so intriguing, I want to take the bike for a spin right now. It displays important telemetry like the real-time speed, battery level and a unique spectrum right at the bottom. The Braun Motorbike concept has the hint of Tron bike influence too – after all Víctor portrays it as a ride for the dystopian world!

Designer: Víctor Groten Rico

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Virgil Abloh, CEO of Off-White, has passed away at the age of 41

Multidisciplinary celebrity designer, CEO of Off-White and the artistic director of Louis Vuitton’s menswear collection, Virgil Abloh has passed away at the age of 41 after battling a rare form of cancer.

An architect by training, Abloh’s involvement with international fashion started with an internship at Fendi’s in 2009, alongside Kanye West. Following a year-long collaboration with the rapper, Abloh founded Off-White in 2012, and was also hired as the artistic director for menswear at Louis Vuitton.

In the announcement done via an Instagram post on Virgil’s account, the statement says, “For over two years, Virgil valiantly battled a rare, aggressive form of cancer, cardiac angiosarcoma. He chose to endure his battle privately since his diagnosis in 2019, undergoing numerous challenging treatments, all while helming several significant institutions that span fashion, art, and culture.”

“Through it all, his work ethic, infinite curiosity, and optimism never wavered. Virgil was driven by his dedication to his craft and to his mission to open doors for others and create pathways for greater equality in art and design. He often said, “Everything I do is for the 17-year-old version of myself,” believing deeply in the power of art to inspire future generations.”

Rest In Peace.
Virgil Abloh
September 30, 1980 – November 28, 2021

Braun x Virgil Abloh

Earlier this year, Abloh partnered with Braun to mark 100 years since the founding of the German design giant, by helping redesign the 1965 Wandanlage, a hi-fi audio wall unit as well as the BC02 alarm clock (showcased below).

The product in question is the 1965 Wandanlage, a hi-fi audio wall unit that Abloh sought to update, turning it into ‘functional art’ that reflected Braun’s design values along with Abloh’s eclectic cultural and musical references from the past 100 years. In its 2021 edition, the new Wandanlage sports a beautiful chrome design that unites Braun’s love of the material (as seen in its 1960 SM3 shaver and 1961 T1 toaster) with Abloh’s hat tip to the glitz and the shimmer of chrome accents often associated with hip-hop culture through the later years.





About the collaboration, Virgil Abloh said, “I have always had a deep appreciation for Braun design. For the brand’s 100 years, I jumped at the opportunity to reimagine this iconic Braun product and challenge what we have come to expect from design. The “functional art” piece co-curated with Braun Design not only highlights the original function of the hi-fi wall unit that was the best audio of its time, but also the quality and durable materials that are built to last. As a creator, I continue to question how art is perceived in today’s culture. “Functional art” is a lasting legacy of the enduring power of good design that is simple, useful and built to last. In so doing, it advances the frames of design references beyond design ‘purists’ to broader audiences.” Abloh further described his inspiration and this collaborative journey in the video above, shot at Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s iconic Farnsworth house.

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This vibrant geometric pencil sharpener brings some Braun inspiration to your desk!

“My heart belongs to the details. I actually always found them to be more important than the big picture. Nothing works without details. They are everything, the baseline of quality.” A stationery design inspired by Braun’s styling needs Dieter Ram’s words to revise his design philosophy, a way to look into the minds that shaped the face of modern industrial design. To channel the same philosophies, we have this Braun-inspired pencil sharpener, and let’s look at how it touches the design principles in every facet of its design.

Meet the Co-Box, an electric pencil sharpener, minimal and geometric by design that is a worthy addition to every design nerd’s desk. The design is a white square shape, accentuated by an orange circle, reminiscent of the button we would see on our Braun machines. The circle also acts as an entry point for your pencil. The shavings get collected in a transparent box, to be disposed of at your conveniece. The design history of our 20th century is filled with iconic design moments, each one a point in time when the object became a part of our everyday life, almost seamlessly – all because of the nature of their design. This sharpener encapsulates the same timeless spirit and just like you hang your favorite posters on your wall, every designer holds an object by their iconic design mentors on their desk.

Simplicity, excellence, and functionality – these are the pillar of good design, and maybe having this sharpener on your desk will remind you to stay decluttered in your design philosophy, the way Dieter Rams envisioned good design should be!

Designers: Yang Lei, Bryan Ding, Canaan Wen with Yifeeling Design

Braun and Virgil Abloh collaborate to celebrate 100 years of ‘Good Design’





Marking 100 years since the German company was first founded, and celebrating a century of changing the landscape of design and bringing Bauhaus art and German functionality to the world, Braun teamed up with designer, entrepreneur, and DJ Virgil Abloh to reinvent one of its classic products.

The product in question is the 1965 Wandanlage, a hi-fi audio wall unit that Abloh sought to update, turning it into ‘functional art’ that reflected Braun’s design values along with Abloh’s eclectic cultural and musical references from the past 100 years. In its 2021 edition, the new Wandanlage sports a beautiful chrome design that unites Braun’s love of the material (as seen in its 1960 SM3 shaver and 1961 T1 toaster) with Abloh’s hat tip to the glitz and the shimmer of chrome accents often associated with hip-hop culture through the later years. The design still reflects Braun’s ‘less is more’ philosophy, while the company also ensures that the original hi-fi audio remains the hero of the collaboration – and the technology still functions today as it did back in 1965.

About the collaboration, Virgil Abloh said, “I have always had a deep appreciation for Braun design. For the brand’s 100 years, I jumped at the opportunity to reimagine this iconic Braun product and challenge what we have come to expect from design. The “functional art” piece co-curated with Braun Design not only highlights the original function of the hi-fi wall unit that was the best audio of its time, but also the quality and durable materials that are built to last. As a creator, I continue to question how art is perceived in today’s culture. “Functional art” is a lasting legacy of the enduring power of good design that is simple, useful and built to last. In so doing, it advances the frames of design references beyond design ‘purists’ to broader audiences.” Abloh further describes his inspiration and this collaborative journey in the video above, shot at Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s iconic Farnsworth house.

Designers: Braun X Virgil Abloh


An image of the original Wandanlage sound unit from 1965.

From blending to steaming, this Dieter Rams-inspired modular kitchen appliance does 6 unique functions!

Kitchen appliances can quickly turn into collections of bulky hardware and tangles of wire if we’re not careful. Blenders, toasters, kettles, and steamers – the wish list is endless and there’s always a new kitchen tool that could be added to our carts, and then when it comes time to organize, forget about it. Modular kitchenware designs come in handy when we feel that we’ve reached our limits…or storage capacities. Finding inspiration in the design language of Dieter RamsBraun collection, ChenKai Zhang created renderings for a modular kitchenware concept that’s as familiar and practical as the iconic Braun appliance.

Zhang recognized several strong points in Braun’s design language, including its timelessness, efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and approachability. Zhang hoped to achieve a similar timeless feel for his modular kitchenware concept by attributing like-minded color schemes and construction materials to his product design. The clean coupling of stainless steel accents with a colorful coating of ABS plastic is reminiscent of Braun products and carries with it a sense of familiarity. With this combination of fresh, sleek display and a trusted construction process, Zhang developed his own interpretation of Braun’s approachable and timeless appeal. Zhang essentially universalized Rams’ mechanical design language to offset and charge one base component so that it can then provide power for other attachable kitchen appliances such as juicers, electric kettles, and blenders. Inside the base component, gear buckles, motors, and conductors all work together to either provide heating or power for the two mixing blades to run. The base component consists of a high-speed motor and a heating component to which users can attach and utilize most kitchen appliances. In order to take up less space in the kitchen, Zhang ensured that all of the kitchen modules were the right size to stack onto one another. Zhang also redesigned the spout for modules containing liquid by both flattening it, offering slower pours, and lengthening it for easy pickup.

An integrated interface of two aluminum switches, located on the design’s electric base component, gives users the option to either use a high-speed motor or a heater. Once decided, additional modular components can then be attached to the base component to prepare food items according to the chosen mechanism. In addition to the three modules mentioned, Zhang designed frying pan, steamer, and breakfast pot modules to attach to the base component for other options. The product design’s efficiency is attained through Zhang’s commitment to practicality above all else. This practical approach to design is shown through the modular kitchenware’s conceptualization phase. Moving through three generations of products, Zhang ultimately designed a modular tool for the kitchen that allows users to choose between six different functioning cooking appliances.

Designer: ChenKai Zhang

The Braun Audio 07 is a simple, yet sophisticated looking (conceptual) speaker system

Embodying the tenets of good design in a way that would make Rams pretty happy, the Braun Audio 07 from Abdelrahman Shaapan does the job of playing music and looking minimal while it does. The Braun Audio 07 is a simple Spotify-playing machine with a bare-basics aesthetic and interface… In short, it’s sensible. It does what you want it to do, without a fuss, letting you navigate Spotify using a touchscreen display, while a volume knob that sits on the salt-pepper weave speaker-grill lets you adjust how loud your music is.

The speaker can be hung on a wall or placed on a surface like a desk or mantelpiece. Wire-routing pathways let you connect the Braun Audio 07 to a power source, and it seems like a secondary port lets you plug and connect multiple Audio 07s to create a powerful stereo setup.

Designer: Abdelrahman Shaapan