New images show the majestic Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck dominating on even the toughest terrain

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Purpose-built for handling tough tasks with ease, the Honda Ridgeline EV Concept was designed to project power. Its tough, sinewy construction puts other pickup trucks to shame, and makes a case for ‘maximalism’ in automotive design. Sure, minimally designed trucks (yeah, I’m looking at you, Tesla) look alright, but using minimalism to be different feels like a cop-out. The Ridgeline is a great example of how a truck can look different without compromising on an aggressive, muscular, dominating design language.

We featured the Honda Ridgeline EV Concept a week ago (you can click here to read the original piece which got over 90,000 pageviews) and today we look at the concept in its natural habitat – anywhere except the road!

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

The Ridgeline EV concept comes from the mind of California-based Rene Garcia, a concept designer at ILM who’s previously worked on The Mandalorian, Thor: Ragnarok, The Avengers, and the Transformers anthology. Garcia began designing the vehicle as a Dakar rally truck, but gradual iterations slowly turned it into a conceptual pickup truck for Honda. Designed to handle pretty much anything you can throw at it, the EV comes with its own winch-hook on the front, a frunk behind it, suicide-style rear doors that give you access to the car’s spacious interiors, and an expandable truck-bed on the back that even comes equipped with tools and emergency medical kits.

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Against rocky terrain, it’s easy to draw parallels between the Ridgeline EV and the Warthog anti-infantry vehicle from the popular game Halo. They come from the same place of wanting to project power and assertion, and were made to operate seamlessly on any surface. The Ridgeline’s ground-clearance and large treads do wonders on rough land, and something about seeing a car leaving a massive dust cloud just gets the adrenaline rushing!

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

The Ridgeline is bulky to look at, but negative spaces in its design help cut its volume manifold, still making it look like a chiseled, mean machine. Two cutouts in the hood let you look at the top of the car’s shock absorbers, while the doors come with two sets of windows – one on the top as well as fixed windows near the legs, to help sunlight pore in. There’s a skylight built in too, and if at any point of time you need more open space, the back of the car opens up and allows the rear seats to flip 180° and face backward!

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

The car comes designed for the great outdoors. Its top allows you to add an aerodynamic roof box for extra storage (if the truck-bed isn’t enough), and the car’s front and back come dotted with lights to keep the road ahead visible, as well as allow you to be seen from a distance.

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

The Honda Ridgeline EV concept’s interiors literally put you in the lap of luxury too, no matter how deserted and inhabitable the immediate outdoors are. The pickup truck comes with immaculate leather surfacing on the seats as well as leather and wood trims on the doors and the dashboard. The dash also comes equipped with a pretty wide single-screen that covers your entire field of view from left to right. Side cameras feed video footage right into this dashboard and a rear-view camera sends its feed to a rear-view display up top. Don’t worry if you’re not in the driver’s seat or if you’re sitting shotgun. The rear seats have their own entertainment systems too, with interactive displays integrated into the backside of the front seats. The skylight in the center is accompanied by ceiling lights on either side, so you’ve got nothing to worry about when you’re driving in pitch darkness. Moreover, the seats recline fully and the back opens up into a really comfy bed if you want to set up camp anywhere. However, if you’ve got yourself a quad-bike, you could easily mount it on the back too!

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Also Read: Honda’s INSANE electric pickup truck concept will have the Tesla Cybertruck begging for mercy

This is an independently-made conceptual design and the Honda logo is used for representational purposes only.

Honda’s INSANE electric pickup truck concept will have the Tesla Cybertruck begging for mercy

In a back-alley street fight, the Cybertruck looks like the edgy teenager who just lifts weights and has never done a leg-day… the Honda Ridgeline EV, on the other hand, looks like a 40-something veteran who’s returned from being stationed in the middle east for decades. Pitch the two together and it’s pretty evident who’d win in a bare-knuckle scuffle.

Something about the Ridgeline EV concept makes you want to take it seriously. It wasn’t built for fun, those windows aren’t for lobbing steel balls at… it’s inherently sinewy, bold, and is purpose-built for power-tasks.

The Ridgeline EV concept comes from the mind of California-based Rene Garcia, a concept designer at ILM who’s previously worked on The Mandalorian, Thor: Ragnarok, The Avengers, and the Transformers anthology. Garcia began designing the vehicle as a Dakar rally truck, but gradual iterations slowly turned it into a conceptual pickup truck for Honda. Designed to handle pretty much anything you can throw at it, the EV comes with its own winch-hook on the front, a frunk behind it, suicide-style rear doors that give you access to the car’s spacious interiors, and an expandable truck-bed on the back that even comes equipped with tools and emergency medical kits.

A standout feature of the car’s design is in its use of hollow spaces. The Ridgeline is bulky to look at, but negative spaces in its design help cut its volume manifold, still making it look like a chiseled, mean machine. Two cutouts in the hood let you look at the top of the car’s shock absorbers, while the doors come with two sets of windows – one on the top as well as fixed windows near the legs, to help sunlight pore in. There’s a skylight built in too, and if at any point of time you need more open space, the back of the car opens up and allows the rear seats to flip 180° and face backward!

Designer: Rene Garcia

The Tesla Cybertruck won’t deliver before 2022, but Hot Wheels has an RC Cybertruck you can buy today!

Designed at 1:10th scale, Mattel’s Cybertruck replica comes with its own remote control as well as a Cyberquad. As far as I can tell, the windows on the toy pickup truck break much more easily…

Mattel’s 1:10 RC Cybertruck comes with that unmistakably polarizing design, authentic wheels + tire treads, working head and taillights, and a flat-bed that’s big enough to fit its free-rolling Cyberquad. The truck itself is controlled by a pretty neat-looking controller that mimics the shape of the Cybertruck’s own steering wheel, and allows you to operate the truck up to 12 MPH (which may seem paltry at first, but it makes Mattel’s Cybertruck one of the fasted remote-controlled cars on the market).

The RC Cybertruck’s available on Mattel’s website (you don’t need to wait till 2022 for yours)… and at just $100, it’s about the same price as the real Cybertruck’s preorder. You know, the refundable preorder that you can definitely cancel for this delightfully wicked RC truck?

Designer: Mattel (Hot Wheels)

Tesla hasn’t produced any new cars in over 2 years… but it can’t stop announcing them.

[This is an Editorial. The views, opinions, and positions expressed in this article are my own.]

Tesla’s most popular car to date, the Model 3, was announced in 2016. Its most recent production unit, the Model Y, was announced in March of 2019, more than 2 years ago. Ever since that moment up until now, Tesla’s debuted the Roadster 2nd Gen, the Tesla Semi, the Cybertruck, the Cyberquad, and finally today, an updated Roadster 2nd Gen (SpaceX Package). It hasn’t committed to a delivery date for any of them.

Imagine you ordered the iPhone 12 in 2020, and Apple said it would deliver the smartphone to you in 2021. You wait for a year and instead of receiving an iPhone 12, you receive news that Apple, instead of working on producing and delivering the iPhone 12, spent all that time designing an iPhone 12S. Apple now has two conceptual products in its catalog, and you, the consumer, have nothing in your hand. That’s the short story of the Tesla Roadster. If you’re one of the thousands of people who have been waiting for the 2nd Gen Roadster since 2019, you probably feel pretty annoyed that Tesla already announced a better version without even delivering on its previous version. You can’t even buy the Roadster 1st Gen since the company promptly discontinued it. In short, the Roadster is basically a myth at this point… quite like the Cybertruck.

Along with its Roadster 2nd Gen update, Tesla also sent a shoutout mail to the millions of people who ordered a Cybertruck saying… well, saying that the company hadn’t even begun producing it yet. The pickup truck, which was scheduled for delivery in 2021 will start production at the end of 2021. In short, that $100 pre-order you gave to the car company was just one massive paid newsletter program. You’re not going to receive cars by a long stretch in time… you’re just going to receive updates.

All this sort of proves one point that many people have been making for a while now. Let’s first start by acknowledging that producing cars is HARD. It’s an absolute herculean task taking a sketch or a concept render all the way to production – it requires a tonne of money, man-power, infrastructure, a robust supply chain, international cooperation, extensive testing, and a marketing team on steroids. That being said, it’s safe to opine that Tesla isn’t selling cars anymore – it’s selling hype, and more than an entrepreneur, Elon is a hypeman. There’s no doubt that Tesla is at the very forefront of innovation, but it’s difficult to digest that the company’s worth shot up from $75 billion in 2019, to $559 billion today when it hasn’t produced a single new car in the interim.

Full disclosure, I own Tesla stock. I saw its meteoric rise last year and fall this year. I’d love to drag Elon through the mud for being the market manipulator dudebro he is. Ever since his $420 tweet up until now, where he somehow has the power to make cryptocurrency values rise or fall just by tweeting about them, Musk is nothing but a self-proclaimed hustler but this isn’t about him, it’s about the effect he has on Tesla’s ability to hold its ground as a car manufacturer instead of becoming a hype manufacturer.

For the sake of context, let’s just look at what Tesla announced this weekend. The company’s NY account announced that the Roadster prototype was being showcased at the Petersen Automotive Museum, to which Elon promptly announced that the production model would look even better than the prototype, and a special SpaceX package (courtesy a collaboration between two of Elon’s companies) would see the Roadster getting a major acceleration upgrade of 0-60 in 1.1 seconds, thanks to the presence of cold air rocket thrusters built right into the automobile. Sounds fancy, right? Well, it also sounds imaginary because the Roadster IS imaginary. Those specs mean nothing if the product doesn’t exist. It’s a lot like Musk’s fancy underground tunnel network, which was supposed to help cars avoid traffic by blitzing through sub-surface tunnels at nearly the speed of sound. A demo video released by The Boring Company showed pretty much that, except the cars were moving at a paltry 40mph. Musk also was responsible for major fanfare around Neuralink, his revolutionary brain-augmenting hardware company. Their first major demo had nothing except for a few pigs demonstrating how the Neuralink chip could read brainwaves. Impressive, sure. Is it what Elon promised? Not by a far shot.

The irony of me being the editor of a design website that primarily covers conceptual content isn’t lost on me. However, those concepts don’t trade on the stock market. After a certain point, what’s the difference between Tesla and some designer with a Behance profile – they both announce concepts, except one of them’s a $559 billion-dollar company. What’s the point of innovation if it won’t exist for another half-decade (a conservative guess, no less)… we’re also assuming that Tesla will actually deliver on these promises – so if it doesn’t, how is Tesla any different than Theranos or Magic Leap??

You see, the reason I used Apple as an example earlier on is that barring the AirPower, Apple’s always been absolutely 100% certain of its capabilities. It announces products it intends on delivering in the near future. Apple is great at innovating WHILE managing its expectations… and if Tesla wants to be treated as a disruptor and a company modeled on the fast-paced Silicon Valley modus operandi, it better deliver too. Not on ideas, not on random flip-flops between fiat currencies and cryptocurrencies, but on expectations. Sure, I understand that car-companies often announce models that take a year or two to produce. However, Tesla isn’t most car companies, and the Roadster still doesn’t have a definite set-in-stone delivery date even 2 years post its announcement. Heck, the Cybertruck was announced 20 months ago and it still won’t begin production for another 6 months at the least. There’s no doubt in my mind that electric cars are the future… but let’s face it, every tweet Elon sends needs to end with “Terms and Conditions Apply”.


Designer Charlie Nghiem imagines what the Tesla Roadster SpaceX Package could look like

Cybertruck-inspired Rover concept was designed to explore the terrain on Mars

The Pandemax Concept by Radek Štěpán is unconventional, to say the least. It has a distinct Star Wars-inspired aesthetic and those all-terrain tires and that high ground clearance really implies the car could easily work on the roughest of alien terrain. Designed to be a sort of explorer vehicle or manned rover, the Pandemax comes with two seats that are at the absolute front of the vehicle, with a panoramic windshield that lets the explorers get a full view of the terrain and landscape ahead of them. Sure, there are a few questions that come to mind too, especially regarding driver safety and also the center-of-gravity, given that the drivers are sitting outside the car’s wheelbase. However, it’s a neat aesthetic exploration of an interplanetary vehicle if you ask us. I’m especially loving the Cybertruck vibe, and I’m sure the driver gets a hell of a view! Just hope that windshield glass is sturdier than the Cybertruck’s…

A look at the car’s unusual placement of the cockpit. The passenger cabin overhangs off the front, giving the car a distinctly different aesthetic altogether. I guess we could just chalk it up to conceptual creative freedom. As the cockpit door opens upwards, the base descends downwards too, giving you a stepping surface as you climb into the vehicle. When the cockpit door and floor finally close together, you’re left with a car that has surprisingly large ground clearance, making it perfect for rough terrain.

The headlights and taillights on the Pandemax are rather ‘Cybertruckian’ too, with the LED strip design present on the front and back, as well as the top. Its boot at the back has a shutter-style cover too, almost perfectly mimicking the one found on Tesla’s Cybertruck.

Designer: Radek Štěpán

Check out more designs by Radek Štěpán here

The Nissan GTR Stravinsky brings the edgy Cybertruck aesthetic to an American muscle car design

On paper, the combination sounds weird… but looking at those marvelous renders, it works.

The Nissan GTR Stravinsky was designed inspired by popular Russian composer Igor Stravinsky who had an unusual way of visually expressing his musical compositions. Stravinsky’s unconventional approach to documenting his music was a discordant mess of angled lines, and even though it strayed away from traditional music styles, it made absolute sense… Similarly, the GTR Stravinsky is far from conventional, but it looks like a perfect combination of sinewy grace and aggression, just like any good muscle car.

The Nissan GTR Stravinsky concept comes from the mind of Moscow-based automotive designer Timur Dautov. The idea for the car came to him while watching an episode of Top Gear, when Jeremy Clarkson described the Nissan GTR R35 as something Stravinsky would have designed. Finding that to be an interesting design brief, Dautov began working out what “Stravinsky’s GTR” would really look like. The results amplify the edgy incongruous aesthetic of the GTR R35 to the extent that the car looks too unreal for this world.

The comparison to the Cybertruck is unavoidable. The origami-inspired surfacing, the nude silver paint-job, these details help propel the Stravinsky into a cyberpunkish future. The car’s design feels almost like a really basic low-poly model, and the way it reflects light is rather atypical of most cars which create highlights and shadows that define the car’s curves. The Stravinsky, on the other hand, looks like it’s deliberately breaking the rules. Igor Stravinsky would have loved that. Plus, that silver paint job is perfect for this car – I can’t imagine its design really working with any other color. Perhaps a matte black or a pearlescent purple.

The car manages to find order and beauty in chaos. It uses a paneling-style design but still manages to create an engaging 3D volume. The aesthetic is dominated by straight lines, although designer Timur Dautov carefully uses curved lines and surfaces to create a contrast that looks wonderful. The headlights and taillights are both simple yet iconic in their own right, while the extended lower lip on the front bumper really defines the car’s front as well as its side. Plus, can we just admit that there’s something undeniably hypnotic about those beautiful rims??

Designer: Timur Dautov

This Apple SUV is like the iPhone 12 Pro Max of smart electric vehicles!





Over the past decade, Apple has cultivated a reputation of being sleek, slim, and petite. Its iPhones are thinner than a centimeter, the iPads and MacBooks are literally slim enough to slip into manila envelopes, and the new iMac is probably the slimmest desktop PC ever made. With that image in mind, it’s perfectly natural to imagine that the Apple Car would echo those very attributes. Close your eyes and think of an “Apple Car” and a sedan should naturally come to your mind. Concept Designer Jan Peisert feels differently. Meet the Apple One, a sophisticated looking SUV created in the image of the company behind the iPhone.

Peisert’s Concept One embodies all the good aspects of Apple (and a few unsavory ones) into a design that’s meant for the entire family. It’s a luxury car, but it isn’t a sedan. Instead, the Apple One is a one-for-all sort of SUV that accommodates 4 or more people pretty spaciously. Its proportions (and especially that headlight) feel slightly like a cross between the Tesla Cybertruck and the Rivian SUV. The design is mildly angular but doesn’t come with any edgy surfaces or straight lines. Instead, everything curves rather organically… a feature also seen in the continuous curves found on Apple products. Speaking of Apple products (and also of unsavory aspects), the Apple One sports that infamous cheesegrater grille on the front. One could argue that an electric SUV wouldn’t need a grille, but Peisert probably took a creative call with that one there. Moreover, who knows, maybe an air intake would help keep the car’s CPU cool?

Aside from the illuminated logo on the front (something that’s sort of becoming a trend with fan-made Apple car concepts), the car comes with rather slick headlights and taillights. The linear lights, apart from illuminating the road, double as indicators too, with the headlight glowing entirely on the left or right to indicate intention, while the vertical channels on the taillight turning orange. The Apple One even has indicators built into the doors (at the seam between the door and window) that allow everyone to know when the car’s about to make a turn. A third break-light on the back lets people behind the Apple One know when the car’s slowing down or stopping.

The Apple One is detailed out in two variants – silver and space-gray. Both variants are practically identical in physical appearance, although the silver car comes with wooden trims on the front and back, while the space-gray sports carbon fiber trims instead… sort of like a Pro version.

There aren’t any details on the interiors (after all this is digital art and not a real 3D concept), although Peisert’s highlighted a few external features that are pretty intriguing. For instance, the slick headlights aren’t the only road-illuminating feature on the front. The Apple One also comes with laser headlights that sit on either extremes of the Apple logo. These headlights project powerful spotlights on the road, allowing you to see in low-light conditions as you drive. The car even comes with retractable side-view cameras, gesture-controlled butterfly doors and trunk, and a wireless-charging base that also debuted in Emre Husmen’s Apple Car concept. While the Apple One concept doesn’t detail any technical features, it’s safe to say an Apple car would also tie in with the ecosystem, having the ability to unlock or hit ignition on the iPhone. The car would probably run on a self-driving AI that uses the strong catalog of sensors that Apple’s designed and built into its product. It’s safe to say the car would also help Apple Maps strengthen and grow its user base over the years, and if the smart car responds to commands like “Hey Siri, take me to Starbucks”, Apple has a clear winner on its hands!

Designer: Jan Peisert

This solar-powered trailer pops-up to embrace multi-purpose living in your Cybertruck!





Tesla Cybertruck is going to hit the roads later this year or maybe early 2022, and people who’ve booked the next-gen MUV are already mustering up the ways in which they’ll make judicious use of their machine. One use case scenario is towing a trailer on the back of the Cybertruck for adventure trips. Even better is to have a collapsible camper that fits right in the vault (the bed of Cybertruck). Meet the Cyberlandr, a telescopic pop-up camper attachment for the Cybertruck which almost pans double the height of the truck when fully retracted vertically.

Similar to the Cybertruck, the Cyberlandr does away with external door handles and opens when an authorized person puts the foot on the steps or gains access via the compatible app. On the inside, the minimalistic pop-up camper has a very airy feel to it, thanks to the dual-pane windows with electrochromic dimming when required. It even makes space for a bathroom (with a showerhead and self-cleaning dry flush toilet) and a multi-use living area which can be used as a section for the kitchen, office work, or night sleep. For this, the kitchen utility comes in the form of a counter with a large sink, dual induction burners embedded in the cooktop, and a refrigerator. Once you no longer require meal prepping, the pair of lounge chairs can be used for your work or simply having some rest – it even has two pivoting desks. When the nighttime hits, the chairs unfold meticulously into a sleeping area as they morph into a double bed.

To ensure you have a comfy space to relax, the compact all-season camper comes with heated floors, a voice-activated faucet, 32-inch TV, and a 4-stage water filtration system. All this equipment is powered by the 500-watts of slide-out solar roofs, one on top of the other. One of them extends beyond the edge of the camper, doubling as an overhead shade for the entrance section.

The total weight of the accessory is around 1,360 pounds and it only affects 5 percent of the Cybertruck’s total driving range – way better than some of the other camper trailers designed for the Tesla’s truck that also add to the aerodynamic drag. Cyberlandr however, doesn’t add any drag since it retracts into the truck’s bed. The retractable trailer can be booked with a security deposit of just $100, and taking that up higher to $5,000 will give you preference over others. The pop-up trailer will cost $49,995 in total, and we’ll be looking forward to seeing it in action when the Cyber truck hits the roads!

Designer: Cyberlandr