Sustainable Product Designs to ensure you travel and holiday in eco-friendly style!

Everyone is veering towards sustainability! Living sustainably, consciously, and considerately has become imperative now. And traveling shouldn’t be an exception! We all love jet-setting off on holidays, and it’s now our moral duty towards the environment to vacation as sustainably as possible. From staying at hotels and resorts that support eco-tourism to using travel products that are sustainable, there are many minor steps we can take that will contribute to a major change. In this spirit of green traveling, we’ve curated a collection of product designs that promise to make your next trip as eco-friendly and sustainable as possible! These are products that are not only conscious of the environment but also capable of catering to your needs as efficiently as possible. These unique designs could completely transform how we travel and vacation. Enjoy!

PriestmanGoode’s sustainable inflight meal service has completely transformed the conventional meal tray we are so used to receiving on a flight. “We’ve used a wide range of materials for our design concepts,” says Rowan. And they’ve kept their word. Each element is either partially edible, reusable, soluble, or biodegradable. They’ve ditched plastic meal trays for partially edible ones made from coffee grains and husks mixed with a lignin binder. The miscellaneous food containers that fit into the tray have been made from wheat bran. Banana leaf or algae have been combined with rice husk to create lids for side dishes like salad. Whereas a wafer has been used as a dessert lid, hence the materials symbolically reflect the food. Instead of having several pieces of single-use cutlery, the handy ‘spork’- a combination of a fork and spoon- made from coconut wood has been adopted. The usual plastic containers for milk or sauces have been abandoned in exchange for edible pods created from soluble seaweed.

A team of designers created RHITA – a suitcase that is super easy to assemble and disassemble which makes it easier to repair or recycle. “Every year hundred thousand of discarded luggage caused by damaged wheels, handles, shells or shells that are deformed or damaged by collision, hard to be repaired or disassemble for recycling, bringing great impact to the environment. Hence, design for assembly and disassembly allows the suitcase easy to repair or recycle, reduced parts by simplifying the structure and minimized material used, downsize shipping volume to decrease carbon footprint boosting sustainability,” says the design team. RHITA’s simplified structure reduces the number of parts used in production by 70% when compared to traditional suitcases. Even the space needed for transportation has been reduced by 33%. It features an innovative hinge system and a unique installation method – no glue or rivet for fixation, no sewing of the inner lining, maximizing the space inside as well as a quick fasten and loosen wheel mechanism.

The Green Box is an innovative solution that aligns hotel stays with your sustainable lifestyle choices! It is an amenity kit designed to help hotels to transition to a circular economy and avoid the waste generated by tens-of-millions of amenity kits are thrown away by hotel chains – we use them once but they last forever on our planet. Green box is made from compostable plastic which will let hotels industrially compost and organically recycle the items in a controlled environment. The design goes beyond providing functional value and also aims to educate guests about the material and its impact to encourage better choices even after the vacation ends. Each box comes with a disposable bin for the room to familiarize guests with the new kind of waste stream. The guests will sort materials as compostable and non-compostable by simply following the color grading – green for compostable and white for general waste.

PANGEA’s Bamboo Adventure Towel 2.0 is carbon-negative – they pull more carbon out of the atmosphere than they put in, leaving the earth in a better condition than it was before. Unlike most travel towels which come made from plastic microfibers, the Bamboo Adventure Towel 2.0 has absolutely no plastic used in its construction. As its name suggests, it comes crafted from 100% bamboo fibers, dyed with natural dyes, and woven into a waffle pattern for effective absorption and exfoliation. Designed for the outdoors, the towels are up to thrice as absorbent as your average microfiber towel and are naturally hypoallergenic and anti-bacterial. In fact, the towels even come with reinforced slits on the corners, so you can suspend them and use them as makeshift sunshades, or even wear them as cloaks or ponchos.

It’s no secret that washing your derriere with water is more efficient, hygienic, and sustainable as compared to toilet paper. After all, you don’t wipe your dishes clean with a tissue after eating in them, so why use tissues on your behind? I’ll admit, it’s a culture-shock changing how you clean your behind, but given that the US alone uses more than 6 billion rolls of toilet paper annually, it’s an ecological crisis we can’t ignore. Besides, ironically enough, toilet paper takes tons of water to produce. Using a battery-powered motor and an internal water tank that you can top off before you head to the loo, Sonny generates a micro-shower to help you clean up after your business, effectively, hygienically, and sustainably. With an easy-to-use interface, Sonny comes with normal and high-spray settings that shoot water for anywhere between 25-40 seconds (depending on the spray intensity), enough to clean your behind. Besides, much like a bidet, Sonny can even be used on your nether regions too, to keep things hygienic and fresh.

This gives a completely new meaning to the word ‘papercut’! Say hello to the Paper Razor, a sustainable alternative to the disposable plastic razor. The Paper Razor, as its name suggests, comes with an all-paper body and sports a metal blade-head on top. Designed to be flat-packed, the single-use razor comes completely unfolded and can easily be put together in a matter of seconds by merely folding in the sides and the top to create a rigid, ergonomic razor with a grippy handle. Its origami-inspired design gives it as much strength and maneuverability as a plastic razor, while minimizing the use of plastic by as much as 98%. The result? A razor that can be easily flat-packed and shipped, used, and then disposed of… safely, of course. It’s perfect to carry around and use on your work or leisure trips!

Designed to be a reusable travel cutlery set with a difference, the Cliffset doesn’t just focus on portability, it focuses on maintenance too, by being perhaps the only cutlery set I’ve seen that comes with its own cleaning tool to clean up after you’re done eating! Everything fits in a portable pouch that’s small enough to fit in your pocket or slip into a backpack, and is designed to be carried everywhere you go and be cleaned and reused over and over again, giving you the comfort of knowing that you’re using your OWN cutlery (as opposed to using cutlery in restaurants) made from reusable materials, which you don’t need me to tell you is a much better option compared to the use-and-throw plastic cutlery that pollutes our planet and oceans.

These cork headphones are another great addition to that list and show us that gadgets can also go green – you would be surprised to know how much plastic goes in making a simple pair of headphones. Weighing only 64 grams  (0.14 lbs) these headphones are super light! Cork is a versatile material that is being explored to design sustainable products. It is non-allergic, resilient, sound insulating, moisture-proof, and soft to touch. If you are an everyday headphone user, you know that there is a lot of wear and tear that happens and instead of repairing, we usually just upgrade which increases our plastic consumption. Cork headphones are easy to repair and dismiss thanks to an assembly based on the compressibility of the material. There is no glue, no upholstery, no screws involved – just cork, simple electric parts, steel, and foam. These are perfect for listening to your favorite tunes on those long travel journeys!

The ClickStraw addresses the inherent flaws of the straws before it. Plastic straws are an environmental hazard, paper straws become soggy, bamboo straws end up developing molds, and metal straws are difficult to clean. Made from high quality and sustainable TPE, the ClickStraw is designed to be used multiple times, and moreover, is easy to maintain. Its hollow, tubular structure can be opened out completely, allowing you to rinse the inner surface of the straw, giving it a deep clean. The ClickStraw’s innovation lies in a ziplock-bag-style snapping fixture and a live-hinge that run along the length of the tube. To clean the straw, slide your thumb in and it opens up. Once you’re done, click it shut like a zip-lock bag and you’ve got yourself a spanking clean straw that doesn’t degrade, get dirty, or worse, corrode like your metal straws. You can now carry your own reusable and sustainable straw whenever you travel, instead of using those pesky single-use plastic straws!

There’s a certain, undeniable convenience to the plastic bottle. It’s easy to just take off the shelf, drink from, and then throw away once you’re done. You don’t need to worry about carrying a bulky bottle along with you that occupies the same amount of space, even when empty. The convenience of plastic is addictive, but it comes at a price. There’s a garbage island the size of Texas floating around in the pacific sea, COVERED with plastic bottles we used and threw away without batting an eyelid. Plastic bottles are preferred because they’re more convenient than carrying your own bulky empty bottles around with you, but the Origami Bottle may have a solution to that convenient problem. Designed to be reusable, but more importantly, be collapsible, the Origami Bottle folds down to 20% of its original size when not in use. Small enough to easily fit into any bag without occupying much space, the Origami Bottle neatly folds down to a nice, portable puck that’s easy and convenient to carry around. When you need to fill it up, the bottle opens up to a full size of 25oz (750ml).

This mushroom-shaped home is the perfect example of architecture meets nature!

Nestled in a pine forest in Xin Yu City of the Jiangxi Province of China is a mushroom-shaped wooden house! Resembling a wild mushroom, the 50 square meter home was constructed by ZJJZ Architecture Practice. The spacious wooden architecture is a private haven in the serene forests of China and was designed to maintain a symbolic connection with nature. And indeed the structure really does harmoniously blend with its greenery-rich surroundings!

The wooden house consists of two sections – the main mushroom-shaped area which comprises the bedroom. The bedroom features a panoramic window which provides amazing views of the surrounding landscape. You can sit on chairs and gaze at the lush greenery. The cone-shaped roof overhead the bedroom is rounded on top, creating the impression of a roof that is expanding and endless. The accompanying loft which serves as a space for children is connected to the bedroom via a set of small-scale stairs. The bathroom and the storage space function as the second volume of the home. A horizontal window has been placed next to the bathroom allowing light to stream into space, while also restricting the view from the pedestrian path, maintaining privacy. The lobby at the entrance is a space to welcome guests and is accompanied by a circular skylight at the top. This skylight enables light to enter the space throughout the day, creating different expressions of light and shadows, leading to a beautiful lobby area.

As mentioned earlier, the home was constructed while maintaining a cohesive relationship with nature. It has been raised on a steel structure to minimize and reduce the impact of construction on the location. The architects envision that with time the surrounding green plants will grow healthily and embrace the building, creating an exquisite combination of architecture that meets nature! Although the house has been built from granolithic concrete, the roof is clad in pinewood, giving the structure a very organic and natural feel. The mushroom-esque home is at one with the greenery around it, it seems like an extension of nature, rather than a concrete structure built in the midst of it. Residing in this home will surely be a peaceful, serene, and calming experience!

Designer: ZJJZ Architecture Practice

This 100% self-sustaining cabin is was placed in the forest without a trace of fossil fuels!

You know my love for cabins and sustainability, I am always searching for the best cabins to go live in once the pandemic is over and sustainable designs that can help slow down the climate crisis. I finally found a design that marries them both and this is the most perfect cabin to exist on my list – a 100% self-sustaining and sustainable off-the-grid cabin that focuses on enjoying as well as preserving the environment it is in! They invented an assembly architecture that is fully adaptable to the environment and doesn’t even need a boom truck to be transported because of the construction technology (through assemblies) – the team takes the materials anywhere even when the construction site is far from the car path.

The latest cabin by the company is called Krul and is developed to perform independently of passive systems. The interiors are designed in a way to allow maximum natural sunlight, especially during winters to keep it naturally warm as much as possible. The orientation of the structure also maintains breezy natural ventilation even during summers. The water harvested or used is naturally treated through a worm-based Lombrifiltro system – think of it as biomimicry of our natural ecosystem. It provides enough for reuse (shower to WC), sanitation, drinking water, and sewage system. The wood used is treated with the best product on the market, certified without chemicals, and the best sealing technology in the world Rothoblass. The cabin completely eliminates the need for fossil fuels, external services, and bills!

ZeroCabin wants to change the habits of its occupants by providing the tools to live sustainably. “It is not about ‘what happens if the water-scarce,’ the questions these days should be ‘if the waters scarce, are my habits according to the water available in the place where I live? If the solar energy is not enough, are my consumption habits according to the energy available?” adds the team when talking about the thought process behind the design. All ZeroCabins regardless of the modality you buy (turnkey or DIY) have a structural base that allows optimal capture of their only two inputs, just like trees: sun and rainwater. The cabin maximizes functionality oversize but includes a wide range of modifications you can do based on the land you want to put it on and as long as it is aligned with their environmental guidelines.

Additionally, the company also encourages all cabin owners to be a part of their 100% ecological tourism network. Every cabin kit sold finances planting of native trees according to the reforestation campaigns. “We do not seek to make houses with character, spatiality, or identity … our architect is nature and its rules, and from there we create something for you. The result is a respectful mutualism that will not break the limits of the environment and in gratitude, you will be able to live without accounts happy of life for the rest of your life,” says the team with utmost love for their work and their efforts to help the environment. ZeroCabin is a home that adapts to you and the planet seamlessly.

Designer: ZeroCabin

This floating yacht-inspired resort is the future of luxurious architecture and getaways!

I often find myself scrolling through the internet looking for plausible vacation destinations I can fly off to once this pandemic comes to an end. Though physically I am sitting in my home, mentally I am halfway across the world, lounging on a beach resort in the Caribbeans! I love this newfound pastime of mine, it fills up any free time I may have throughout the day, and oh how wonderfully it fills it up! During one of my getaway hunts, I came across Miroslav Naskov’s ‘Yacht Hub’, though this exquisite resort is still a concept at the moment, I couldn’t help but go completely gaga over it!

Naskov intends for Yacht Hub to be a hospitality resort, floating on an artificially planted forest canal! Tucked amongst lush greenery, and casually placed upon a serene waterbody, the resort is inspired by the form of a Yacht! Aerial images of the structure display how similar it is to a yacht – from its sleek curves to the white sheen of its body. The resort will feature a yacht station, wherein the yachts that take you to the resort can dock. Though the main area of the resort, where the guests will stay, is placed upon the banks of the waterbody, the guests can walk and stroll around on the floating platforms. It’s as close to the water you can get, without actually dipping into it. The vast variety of plants and greenery add on to the tranquil and peaceful environment of the resort.

Naskov’s Yacht Hub is the ultimate getaway from this modern and hectic world! The waterbody and the surrounding forest area will be artificially created, which will in turn build a completely private space for the resort. Far away from the outside world, this sleek and futuristic resort is a luxurious haven, and I would love to see it become a reality someday!

Designer: Miroslav Naskov of Mind Design

This bamboo-fiber travel towel is probably the world’s first carbon-negative towel




The term ‘carbon footprint’ is defined by the amount of carbon dioxide released during a product’s manufacturing and life-cycle. A majority of the products we consume are carbon-positive – which means their production requires carbon emissions in some form (whether it’s the creation, the distribution, the usage, or even the disposal). Some products, on the other hand, aim at being carbon-neutral by reducing the amount of emissions needed, or balancing them out with practices that pull carbon out of the atmosphere. PANGEA’s Bamboo Adventure Towel 2.0 is carbon-negative – they pull more carbon out of the atmosphere than they put in, leaving the earth in a better condition than it was before.

This vision makes sense, considering PANGEA was founded by a bunch of backpackers who care deeply for nature and the planet’s wellbeing. Their previous product was the PANGEA Bamboo Travel Towel, a sustainable bamboo-fiber towel that went on to become Kickstarter’s most funded travel towel ever. With the Bamboo Adventure Towel 2.0, PANGEA hopes to make everything bigger and better, from the towel itself, to the impact the towel has.

Unlike most travel towels which come made from plastic microfibers, the Bamboo Adventure Towel 2.0 has absolutely no plastic used in its construction. As its name suggests, it comes crafted from 100% bamboo fibers, dyed with natural dyes, and woven into a waffle pattern for effective absorption and exfoliation. Designed for the outdoors, the towels are up to thrice as absorbent as your average microfiber towel and is naturally hypoallergenic and anti-bacterial. In fact, the towels even come with reinforced slits on the corners, so you can suspend them and use them as makeshift sun-shades, or even wear them as cloaks or ponchos. Available in as many as 5 natural colors, the Bamboo Adventure Towel 2.0 comes in 3 sizes, a standard, pocket, and an XL (which transforms into a poncho too) and arrives packaged in a carrying case either made from cork or from a breathable cotton mesh. Every part of the Bamboo Adventure Towel 2.0 + packaging is designed using natural materials and can safely biodegrade outdoors or even be composted at home (barring the plastic zipper on the case and the aluminum carabiner clip).

So wait, how is the towel carbon-negative? Well, that philosophy comes naturally baked into Pangea’s business model. For every $10 that the company makes, Pangea commits to removing 2lbs of trash from the ocean and 2lbs worth of carbon from our atmosphere. With funds from its previous towel, the company organized as many as 26 international ocean cleanups with over 900 volunteers, and Pangea aims at using funds from this project to help set up river-barriers that help trap waste before it enters our ocean. If the project reaches its stretch goal of $200,000, Pangea will put river barriers in the world’s dirtiest river, the Citarum, trapping and collecting nearly 40 tonnes of waste each year. The company is extremely transparent about what it does with its money too. Profits make up 15% of the company’s revenue, and nearly half the amount goes into environmental cleanups while the other significant chunk goes towards ensuring Pangea’s employees are fairly compensated for their work. The result is a company that really paves the way for sustainable growth… while ensuring that the products they deliver are good for the environment as well as for you, the consumer!

Designers: Marcos Bulacio, William Di Ricco & Juan Sebastian Duque of Pangea Movement

Click Here to Buy Now: 3-Piece Towel Set for $67 $84 (20% off). Hurry, only 5/125 left! Raised over $115,000.

Pangea Bamboo Eco Towel 2.0

Designed by backpackers, the Eco Towel 2.0 is the only plastic-free, high-performance adventure towel that cleans trash from the ocean and CO2 from the air.

Biodegradable – Towels are made from 100% bamboo, dyed with natural plant dyes, and are home compostable.

Plastic-free – They use custom-made shipping sleeves from cornstarch and ensure their tags and other materials are all plant-based.

Features & Benefits

With reinforced slits on the corners, you can use the towl as a sunshade or cloak to prevent sunburns.

95% Plant-Based and Biodegradable

How Bamboo Fabric is Made

Click Here to Buy Now: 3-Piece Towel Set for $67 $84 (20% off). Hurry, only 5/125 left! Raised over $115,000.

Camping products designed to glam up your rustic millennial camping adventure!

After a tiring week at work, with the weekend joyfully looming ahead of me, I often find myself fantasizing about a short sweet getaway! Just a few days away from my hectic life, and this hectic world, in a bubble of my own, where all my worries are nowhere to be seen. The pandemic may restrict my actual traveling plans, but it definitely cannot restrict my daydreams about vacations! Jetsetting on a flight may not be a practical option right now, but I do think Camping is a plausible plan! Although camping does have a few downsides too! I mean, you have to get down and dirty, live life on the road, and tackle the moodiness of the elements. In such a scenario, having a set of trustworthy and handy camping products can make a world of difference! Having the right products by your side can make your life much easier during those crucial moments. From an avocado-shaped tent to a portable bbq grill that folds into a suitcase, we’ve curated some fun and functional camping product designs for you! Enjoy.

You can find these unique tents in the Borgloon forest in Belgium if you are looking for a safer alternative to the usual touristy destinations post the pandemic. In fact, it has gained attention only now when people are looking to camp outdoors because it is safer, won’t require you to fly, budget-friendly and avoids the crowds. Designed by the Dutch artist Dre Wapenaar, these ‘Tranendreef’ tree tents blend architecture and sculpture into one functional structure. The tent is suspended above the ground and basically hangs on the tree like fruit. The guests use a ladder to get inside/outside. It can host two adults and two small children. Originally installed as part of a public art project called ‘Pit’ (hence the avocado shape we assume) organized by Z33, it brought art into the public space of Borgloon.

The Z-Triton Electric Houseboat was created as a vehicle that could serve as an alternative to the traditional camper. It is comfortable enough to house two adults for a weekend getaway and the choice of land or water is up to the travelers. The amphibious nature of the modern camper fits into the flexible lifestyle we lead today, especially since air travel is not on the cards anytime soon it is opening up a lot of avenues for local trips in less popular/offbeat locations. The durable houseboat measures 3.6 meters in length, 1.2 meters in width, and 1.55 meters in height.





The Nomad Grill and smoker doesn’t come with any smart buttons or functionality but the intuitive industrial design makes it better than any smart options out there. It’s ultra-portable, has a cool modern design, and packs down to the size of a small briefcase. To make sure the heat stays inside and not radiate to the outside of the unibody case measuring 2×2 feet, it is crafted from anodized aluminum. The inside cooking area gives you 212 square inches of space for smoking or you can opt to double the space with open-grill mode. That’ll give you enough cooking area to barbeque steaks, ribs, or burgers – or even two racks of ribs or 30 burger patties.

Modern lifestyle has created a new genre of digital nomads – people who love the outdoors while balancing their work/ tech life. After all, while we crave a digital detox, we can’t really completely cut off from our smartphones. How can the humble trailer designs be adapted to meet their new-age camping needs while maintaining that sacred indoor-outdoor balance? The answer to that is the “NoMad” – a light and resistant vehicle that is presented as a fusion between a traditional tent and a futuristic-looking van designed by the ABIBOO Studio. Each NoMad creates this balance by designing 3 unique compartments – a wet area that holds the kitchen and bathroom, a living room/guest room/workroom, and thirdly a master bedroom that separates from to living room to help you disconnect at the end of the day. The layout of the trailer holds the wet area at the center of the design, automatically creating a barrier/ separation between the living room and the bedroom. Given the space constraints, every bit in the vehicle design holds storage space and hidden seating space. Smart use of terraces means we can leverage the outside space once the trailer is settled in.

The TACTICA M.020 Camping Tool Card is the novelty you want to always have in your wallet for the multitude of uses it brings to the fore. Ideal for adventure seekers who want to carry as little gear as possible, the multitool has a surprisingly great combo of minimal size (about that of a credit card) and more than 15 functions that come really handy for people who hike, camp, or go for an unexpected adventure quite often. TACTICA M.020 is made from a single piece of super-tough Grade-5 titanium or 420 stainless steel (depending on the one you choose). Well suited for any tasks at home or in the outdoors this tool includes functions like – a sundial, screwdriver, rope tensioner with finger pulls, saw blade for cutting, pry bar, metric ruler for measuring, fire starter courtesy the removable ferrocerium striker rod, tent peg puller for camping in a jiffy, can opener for home use, and bottle opener for times when you desperately need one!

For the good of every camper, Pyro Camp Fire and Grill presents a portable alternative to setting up the fire under the night sky and grill to prepare a sumptuous meal in the wilderness. Pyro Camp Fire is a portable fire pit constructed chiefly of American steel. It is provided with a grill/griddle extension for enthusiasts who want to create an inviting ambiance by burning wood or charcoal in a safe and clean manner. And when the stomach calls, the top extension can be swapped and you are good to prepare a meal or heat up the precook food on you. Designed by a team of camping and overloading enthusiasts themselves, this portable fire pit has an 18-inch long and 14-inch wide combustion chamber, while the contraption measure 9-inch tall.

Thomas Hoffman, a design student at the University of Colorado, managed to work at EarthRoamer (famous overland camper builder) as part of his senior design project after graduation. This polished his overlander skills, and he finally had the confidence to create something of his own – in the process, creating a teardrop trailer startup that now can be deemed as the best camper trailer out there money can buy. The NS-1 (Nomadic Systems 1) was in the works ever since his design project at the university, and once Hoffman was confident about his skills, the project finally saw fruition. This all-electric rugged camper runs solely on solar power with the ability to power the onboard electronics and appliances, including cabin heater, kitchen, lights, and more.

The Muzen Wild Mini Rugged Outdoor Speaker lets you listen to music anywhere! Portable and compact, it’s perfect to carry on all your camping and outdoor adventures. Equipped with a built-in outdoor flashlight that comes in three modes – high, low, and SOS, the speaker can light up those dark areas you encounter while camping. Boasting a six-hour battery life, the speaker is durable and water-resistant as well, so you can carry it to the beach without fear of spoiling it. Listening to your favorite tunes, without damaging the speaker playing it, is now possible with Muzen’s Outdoor Speaker!

The BioLite Headlamp 750 is a wearable light that helps you see in the dark without having to hold a torch in your hand! Perfect for camping and other outdoor adventures, you can wrap the lamp around your head and make use of its eight lighting modes. You can adjust the settings and the brightness according to your need and the need of the environment. The headlamp’s 3D SlimFit construction ensures it stays tightly fitted on your head, so you can carry out your tasks without the fear of it slipping off!

Lee’s induction dual stovetop was constructed to make those tiring, family trips a little bit more relaxing and easygoing because that’s what camping’s all about if you’re doing it right. Eating is a necessary part of any family trip and cooking for the whole family can sometimes take up that prime golden hour time that should be spent fireside. The design for the induction dual stovetop provides two induction surfaces suited for various kinds of cookware and less time spent actually cooking. Since the family was at the center of this design, Lee incorporated a safety sensor that must alert users of surfaces that might be too hot to touch and an intuitive interface that younger folks can understand just as well as the adults.

This robotic pizza-vending machine automates the entire gourmet pizza-making process!





While frozen pizzas will always have a place in my heart (all those years as a student living on a strict budget), it seems they may be short-lived. A company has built what they claim is a ‘pizza vending machine’ that uses robots to automate the pizza-making process. Called the Piestro (a portmanteau of Pie and Maestro), this machine allows you to order artisanal pizzas with a few button-taps. Choose your toppings and the entire apparatus puts your pizza together from scratch, dispensing sauce evenly on the base, generously scattering the toppings, loading it with cheese, and then baking the pie before dispensing it out to you neatly tucked in a pizza-box. Sure, the Piestro won’t replace actually eating a true-blue New York-style pizza handmade by a master pizzaiolo, but it sort of rings the death knell for pre-packaged pizzas, and possibly even for fast-food chains like Dominos and Pizza Hut… because guess what, the Piestro can run 24×7, allowing you to order a pizza even at 3am in the morning.

The Piestro’s process starts with a pre-made pizza base (it’s easier and lasts longer than fresh wet dough) onto which it pours generous dollops of sauce. The pizza moves down the conveyor belt where the toppings you choose (using a touchscreen interface) are scattered on top of it, right before the pizza makes its way into an oven that cooks the toppings. Sort of like one of those toy-grabbing machines, the entire process is visible behind a transparent panel, before the pizza finally pops out of an opening at the base of the machine taking just 3 minutes from start to finish.

The creators of the Piestro highlight how useful a pizza-vending machine would be in current times. It works without any human intervention, and apart from the fact that it needs to be replenished with fresh ingredients ever so often, the Piestro can practically work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, providing fresh pizzas to people even in a lockdown. Not to mention the fact that the pizza comes untouched by human hands (try and match that, Dominos). The company’s even partnering with PopID to ensure contactless payments by relying on facial recognition to authenticate payments to the pizza machine. The Piestro is currently in its funding stages, looking for partners and investors to hop on board and bring this robotic pizza-master to life.

Designer: Piestro

A trailer designed for the modern Nomad to meet their futuristic outdoor camping needs!

Modern lifestyle has created a new genre of digital nomads – people who love the outdoors while balancing their work/ tech life. After all, while we crave a digital detox, we can’t really completely cut off from our smartphones. How can the humble trailer designs be adapted to meet their new-age camping needs while maintaining that sacred indoor-outdoor balance? The answer to that is the “NoMad” – a light and resistant vehicle that is presented as a fusion between a traditional tent and a futuristic-looking van designed by the ABIBOO Studio.

Each NoMad creates this balance by designing 3 unique compartments – a wet area that holds the kitchen and bathroom, a living room/guest room/work room, and thirdly a master bedroom that separates from to living room to help you disconnect at the end of the day. The layout of the trailer holds the wet area at the center of the design, automatically creating a barrier/ separation between the living room and the bedroom. Given the space constraints, every bit in the vehicle design holds storage space and hidden seating space. Smart use of terraces means we can leverage the outside space once the trailer is settled in. Overall the design balances four aspects – lightness (hence saving fuel), creating resistance to avoid collisions or overturning of the vehicle, a minimum thickness that provides the best insulation, and finally, an aesthetically packaged home interior and exterior. These mobile homes can be installed in unique outdoor sites. Its size makes it easy to park in the city and in the garage of the main residence, an important condition for those who want to choose when, where, and for how long to stay in one place.

Working from home and telecommuting has showcased the futuristic scenario where commuting is a bare minimum. As journalist Kimberly Mok, author of the book The modern house bus, points out, “The Internet enables a growing number of people to work from home or travel and work full-time, combined with a strong interest in the minimalist lifestyle. It makes us see more people turning their vehicles into homes that they can take wherever they go”. Freedom from location brings to mind new age campsites equipped with great wifi connectivity and other digital requirements – supplemented by bathrooms and a food store, surrounded by a lot of green or endless kilometers on the beach – and meeting likeminded people when they come across your pathway or have a meetup set with your friends. Call me a romantic, but I do think it would make the perfect meet-cute! The future is an evolution of our past when met with today’s challenge to design a future that is uniquely ours, the digital nomads!

Designer: Studio ABIBOO

3D Printed Architecture that show why this trend is the future of modern architecture!

Nowadays almost everything is being 3D printed, so why should architecture be an exception? Many architectural firms are adopting 3D printing as their preferred technique to build structures. It’s a simple, efficient, and innovative technique that lowers the risks of errors, and also manages to save on time! 3D printing eradicates a lot of tedious steps during the construction process and simplifies it. It is being used to build homes, habitats on Mars, and even coral reef islands! The potential and possibilities of 3D printing in architecture are endless and mindblowing. We’ve curated a collection of 3D-printed structures that left us mesmerized – from a sustainable global habitat to a house fit for Mars, we’ve got a little something for all types of arch lovers!

TECLA  is a completely 3D printed global habitat based on natural materials. TECLA’s construction started as a prototype in 2019 near Bologna, Italy as a response to pressing societal issues of explosive population growth which inevitably led to a lack of affordable accommodation. TECLA is created using entirely reusable, recyclable materials taken from the local terrain – it aims to be a model for circular housing as well as eco-housing. The habitat has been designed by Mario Cucinella Architects and brought to life by WASP’s engineering and printing tech. TECLA is set to be the first house to be entirely 3D-printed using locally sourced clay which has been used for centuries in countries like India as a cost-effective and environmentally friendly alternative to cement – clay is a biodegradable and recyclable material that will make the building a zero-waste structure.

What would you print with free access to a 3D printer and resources? My imagination is running wild between custom accessories and a tiny house! Architecture firm, MEAN* (Middle East Architecture Network), did just that and designed a complete 3D printed pavilion to welcome visitors from all over the world into the mystical desert of Wadi Rum in Jordan. Fun fact about Wadi Rum – it looks so much like the Martian landscape that it has served as a stage for multiple space movies, even for ‘Rogue One: A Star Wars Story’, a cult classic! The Desert Pavilion was created to be a communal oasis of heritage and micro-ecology. When you look at the renders, the structure is a blend of local Bedouin architecture with space-age technology. The design team has envisioned an innovative use of 3D printed panels by deploying them onto a CNC bent steel pipe system. To simulate a holistic tent-like structure, the team used a hybrid of 3D printed polymer shells on 3D printed concrete topography with the ‘Mesh Relaxation’ parametric strategy.

Prvok is the name of this project and it will be the first 3D printed house in the Czech Republic built by Michal Trpak, a sculptor, and Stavebni Sporitelna Ceske Sporitelny who is a notable member of the Erste building society. The house is designed to float and only takes 48 hours to build! Not only is that seven times faster than traditional houses, but it also reduces construction costs by 50%. No bricks, cement, and concrete (responsible for 8% of CO2 emissions alone!) are used which means it reduces carbon emissions by 20% – imagines how much CO2 could be reduced if this was used to build a colony. A robotic arm called Scoolpt designed by Jiri Vele, an architect, and programmer will be used in 3D printing and can print as fast as 15 cm per second.

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Nonprofit New Story, tech company ICON, and design studio fuseproject collaborated to bring an end to global homelessness…or to at least kickstart the beginning of its end. How did they do so? They recently unveiled the world’s first 3D-printed neighborhood in Tabasco, Southern Mexico. Yves Béhar and his studio fuseproject designed the homes by directly collaborating and working with the families they were being built for. “As we spoke to the community members, we realized that a single house design doesn’t respond to the needs and expectations,” said Béhar. “This led us to design a system that allows for different programs, climate factors, and growth for families and spaces.” The community members were included in the selection of the land and throughout the planning process, to ensure their housing requirements were met. The end result will be a lively 3D-printed neighborhood of fifty 500-square-foot, single-story houses for the poorest communities who are always the last to benefit from innovation and technology.

Bjarke Ingle’s BIG and 3D-printed building company ICON are working on Project Olympus – a mission to develop robotic construction for the moon. Bjarke Ingles is the Elon Musk of the architectural world, he loves to explore the impossible and has a penchant for designs that can help save mankind right from his environmentally friendly buildings to Project Olympus. Project Olympus is about finding a way to create a 3D-printed infrastructure for living on the moon using materials found on its surface. Why do we need a habitat on the moon? So that we can launch sustained lunar exploration missions where the astronauts will be able to stay comfortably and carry out their research for extended time periods. The project has also enlisted SEArch+ (Space Exploration Architecture) after it received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) government contract boosted with funding from NASA.

BiodiverCity is one of Bjarke Ingels’ most recent projects, it is a city of three islands connected by autonomous vehicles for land, water, and air to make this a transport emission-free habitat off the coast of Malaysia. Three islands will be built in Penang and will serve as cultural, business, and residential hubs. The most striking thing about the development is that all the transportation on the 4,500 acres will consist of autonomous boats, vehicles, and air travel, making the islands car-free and pedestrian-friendly. Construction is one of the biggest sources of carbon emissions, in fact, even more than the aviation industry. So to reduce the impact on the environment, most buildings will be prefabricated or 3D printed on-site and others will use a combination of bamboo, Malaysian timber, and “green concrete” which is made from recycled materials like aggregate.

In an attempt to deal with Texas’ extreme weather, ICON and 3Strands paired up and built four 3D printed houses in Austin. They’ve been created from ICON’s special cement-based material Lavacrete, which is from Portland. The material is prone to extreme weather conditions and is also resistant to mold. The 3D technology used by ICON is proven to build safer and disaster-resilient homes. The homes are able to withstand floods, wind, fire, and other natural disasters more successfully, in comparison to ordinary homes. The four homes expand from a one-bedroom to a four-bedroom, and also include parking, front porches, and gardens! They are spacious living spaces that will protect the residents from the harsh storms of Texas!

Kamp C claims to have built the first 3D printed house in one piece in Westerlo, Belgium. The house was printed from the largest 3D concrete printer in Europe. Comprising of two floors, it was built on-site! It is eight meters tall with a 90-square-meters floor area and was assembled pretty swiftly. The 3D printed house is a low-energy one and features floor and ceiling heating, a heat pump, and special solar panels. They’re even planning to add a green roof!

NASA Mars 3D Habitat Challenge Finalists





Titled the Mars X House, its design is optimized for the pressure requirements of Mars and comes made with an inner layer of HDPE, followed by an outer covering of concrete and basalt fiber, which is finally reinforced on the outside with vertically spiraling ridges. The house is split into three zones, with their own dedicated emergency exits (the outer spiral staircase), and right at the top is a water reservoir that applies downward pressure on the building, which when combined with the building’s shape, prevents it from exploding due to the pressure imbalance from the inside to the outside.

Designed as a series of modular islands that can transform any waterfront into a public space, Reeform aims at supporting life on land as well as underwater. A portmanteau of the words Reef and Form, the floating island comes with a two-part design. The upper half is designed as a hexagonal floating platform crafted entirely from recycled plastic, while the lower half bio-mimics the design of corals, using 3D printed concrete and calcite. As a result, both the upper and lower halves act as areas of interest for humans and marine life alike. Humans can use the modular platforms to create social spaces on water bodies like riverfronts, lakes, or pools, while the coral-inspired lower half helps reduce ocean acidification as well as promote the growth of live corals which in turn creates its own marine ecosystem, attracting fish and other underwater animals. It’s a win-win!

The Floating structure designs that are making waves in the architecture world!

Floating Architecture always captures my attention and mesmerizes me! There’s something extraordinary about a structure seamlessly floating on water without any real support. It’s a mystery to me, and I’m always trying to dive into the science of it. As if floating architectural structures weren’t masterpieces already, architects are now getting even more creative and inventive. Hotels, cinemas, man-made islands, and even greenhouses can be seen idly floating on water bodies all over the world. From a floating cinema in Paris along the banks of River Seine to a cluster of artificial floating island parks in Copenhagen, we’ve curated a collection of architectural wonders that’ll have you thinking, “How did anyone even manage to build this?!”. I don’t know about you, but most of these places have sealed a spot on my must-see wishlist. Dive in!

The city of Paris launched a floating cinema comprising of 38 socially distant electric boats. Deemed ‘Cinéma Sur L’Eau, the launch of the cinema marks the inauguration of ‘Paris Plages’, a summer program held every year alongside the river Seine. The program features a variety of outdoor sports and recreational activities, and the floating cinema is one of its offerings. This floating concept ensures that the attendees are able to watch and enjoy a movie on a 16 x 9-meter screen while maintaining the necessary distance and practicing precautions. It’s a brilliant idea that ensures social distancing is enforced while engaging in a fun leisure activity!

Have you heard that phrase “Whatever floats your boat”? If you are in Copenhagen, you might even hear “Whatever floats your park!” and that would be in reference to the world’s first “parkipelago” (a portmanteau of park and archipelago) which are a cluster of artificial floating island parks. Designed by a Danish design studio, Studio Fokstrot, and Australian architect Marshall Blecher, these islands were a part of urban development along the waterfront. They are officially called the Copenhagen Islands and each module is created with a flexible public program to keep the interest of the urban dwellers at its core. The islands are activity-friendly and enable visitors to enjoy boating, swimming, kayaking, picnics, performances, events, and more which could also boost tourism or simply make things better for citizens with travel being on the down-low this year.

We’ve seen buildings being made using mushroomsbricks made from recycled plastic and sand wasteorganic concrete, and now are seeing another innovative solution – a floating 3D printed house! Prvok is the name of this project and it will be the first 3D printed house in the Czech Republic built by Michal Trpak, a sculptor, and Stavebni Sporitelna Ceske Sporitelny who is a notable member of the Erste building society. The house is designed to float and only takes 48 hours to build! Not only is that seven times faster than traditional houses, but it also reduces construction costs by 50%. No bricks, cement, and concrete (responsible for 8% of CO2 emissions alone!) are used which means it reduces carbon emissions by 20% – imagines how much CO2 could be reduced if this was used to build a colony. A robotic arm called Scoolpt designed by Jiri Vele, an architect, and programmer will be used in 3D printing and can print as fast as 15 cm per second.

BiodiverCity is one of Ingels’ most recent projects, it is a city of three islands connected by autonomous vehicles for land, water, and air to make this a transport emission-free habitat off the coast of Malaysia. Three islands will be built in Penang and will serve as cultural, business, and residential hubs. The most striking thing about the development is that all the transportation on the 4,500 acres will consist of autonomous boats, vehicles, and air travel, making the islands car-free and pedestrian-friendly. Construction is one of the biggest sources of carbon emissions, in fact, even more than the aviation industry. So to reduce the impact on the environment, most buildings will be prefabricated or 3D printed on-site and others will use a combination of bamboo, Malaysian timber, and “green concrete” which is made from recycled materials like aggregate.

The Lilypad is a luxury villa designed by Chuck Anderson and is anchored just north of Sydney’s Palm Beach. Anderson is a boat enthusiast so it is no surprise that he created a floating house! This beautiful Airbnb is also eco-conscious, it is completely solar-powered and is slowly helping us pivot towards sustainable travel. The exterior of the house is made from timber and includes an open living area, a wine cellar, a sleeping loft, and, of course, a bathroom (for all that wine that we will consume post quarantine on our holiday!). To feel fancy, you have alfresco dining (which means you can eat your food while enjoying the breeze and sun when going outside is cool again) and sunbathing area on the lower level which also boasts of an expansive terrace.

Studiomobile and Pnat came up with the Jellyfish Barge which is a floating, modular greenhouse designed especially for coastal communities and can help them cultivate crops without relying on soil, fresh water, and chemical energy consumption. The innovative greenhouse uses solar energy to purify salt, brackish or polluted water. There are 7 solar desalination units planted around the perimeter and are able to produce 150 liters (39.6 gallons) of clean fresh water every day from the existing water body the greenhouse is floating on. The simple materials, easy self-construction, and low-cost technologies make it accessible to many communities that may not have a big fund.  The module has a 70 square meter wooden base that floats on 96 recycled plastic drums and supports a glass greenhouse where the crops grow. Inside it, there is a high-efficiency hydroponic cultivation method that helps increase water savings by 70% compared to traditional hydroponic systems.

This Eco-Floating Hotel in Qatar is raising the bar for eco-friendly travel and tourism! Powered by wind + solar energy it also features tidal sustainability mechanisms and a revolving restaurant to give you ALL the best views. Designed by Hayri Atak Architectural Design Studio (HAADS), the hotel would span over 35,000 sq m (376,000 sq ft) and house 152 rooms. The giant glass donut-shaped structure has a lush green cover integrated into its exterior and a mesmerizing indoor waterfall with a huge vortex-like glass roof. Sustainability is at the core of this project and all of the design details are centered around it. The vortex shape of the roof will actually be used to collect rainwater for irrigation and more while solar panels + wind turbines will provide clean energy. Even the water current will be harnessed with a tidal energy system so when the hotel turns it can produce power similar to a dynamo. The hotel also intends to purify seawater and treat the wastewater it produces so it doesn’t harm the environment.

I love a floating cabin but when it comes with a floating spa?! That is the ULTIMATE off-the-grid holiday. This luxury getaway is everything you can dream of post-pandemic! Designed to completely immerse you in nature, Nimmo Bay Resorts gives you a wholesome health and wellness experience. Nestled in the wilderness of British Columbia, Nimmo Bay gives you the best of Candian scenery with soaring pine trees and beautiful lakes. One of the most interesting parts of the resort is a floating cedar sauna — a serene, meditative cabin that can be used as a personal wellness space or as a room for group yoga classes. To reach the wooden spa you have to take a kayak or a canoe. The floating wooden platform holds the cabin on one end and an intimate socialization area, picnic table, and tub can on the other end. You can book appointments with practitioners that use both therapeutic and relaxation techniques, as well as Shiatsu and Ayurvedic head massage with 100% natural products.

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When you imagine a farm, this is probably the last thing you’d think of… and that’s precisely its appeal! Called Lotus, this floating architecture is at once a space for growing veggies, dining, and socializing within urban environments. The structure utilizes a vertical design to house its various hydroponic and greenhouse stations. Inside and out, visitors and diners can enjoy waterside views and watch and learn more about their food growing as they dine. Designed to be built on waterways and lakes within cities, they capitalize on centrally located free space to avoid interfering with the existing structures.

With the rising sea levels, coastal communities are first in the line of fire (or should I say water?). Architecture is adapting itself to be more energy-efficient and sustainable, but what are we doing about adapting to the changing climate and the disasters they bring? Vietnam-based firm H&P Architects designed and constructed an adaptable (and floating if need be!) house that can be used as a prototype for various communities around the world. The project is called HOUSE and translates into Human’s Optional USE. It is simple and created with minimal construction materials – a steel frame, wall, roofing options, and interior furnishings so it is just the essentials. The purpose of this design was to help resettle those who were in need of housing after being displaced, either due to disasters or other unfortunate events. What makes HOUSE unique is that it is adaptable as a structure – it can work on the land, or on stilts where flooding is common, or simply float all together supported by barrels which make it buoyant. In fact, the frame of the house and the stilts also make it adaptable for mountainous terrain.