Holographic tech could be key to future quantum computers

A breakthrough in studying light might just be the ticket to the future of quantum computing. Researchers at EPFL have found a way to determine how light behaves beyond the limitations of wavelengths, opening the door to encoding quantum data in a s...

Mall of America debuts helpful holographic elf for the holidays

How would you keep a shopping mall lively in an era when more and more people are buying their holiday gifts online? The Mall of America has a one-word answer: holograms. It's partnering with mixed reality firm VNTANA on what's billed as the "first...

Vimeo launches channel just for holographic video

Vimeo has a reputation for pushing the boundaries of video technology in a bid to stand out, but it's taking things a step further. The service recently launched a channel dedicated solely to holographic video. You'll need one of Looking Glass Fact...

Amy Winehouse’s hologram will tour with a live band in 2019

Amy Winehouse will return to the stage in 2019 as the latest in a long line of deceased performers resurrected as holograms. The digital ghost of Winehouse (who died in 2011) will perform her hits such a "Rehab" and "Valerie" while backed by a live b...

This NERF Blaster Can Cast Floating “Holographic” Spells

Doctor Strange definitely needs this NERF blaster – a gun that generates animated spells out of thin air. This truly is wizardry. This cool hack comes from a Japanese cosplayer, and it is able to achieve the effect by using a spinning LED wand. So even though wizards don’t need guns, now wizard guns are a thing.

The seemingly floating images are created using an effect called persistence of vision. This basically means that the human eye holds onto images for a split second longer than light rays are actually hitting the retina. This is what allows us to interpret the images flashing across the pixels on a screen as moving video, instead of just a slideshow. It’s a really slick effect.

At the end of this customized NERF blaster is a 3D-printed adapter holding a Phantom 3D LED wand. As the wand spins, the LEDs along its length flash in specifically-timed patterns to fool the human eye into seeing 360-degree animations. Make sure you check out the end of the video, where the modder reveals some of the software they used to create the animated spells.

Sadly there’s no way to download those spells so you will have to consult a spellbook.

[via Hackaday via Gizmodo]

Nissan: Leaf EV pre-orders are over 13,000

Over the last week or so we've seen some wild concepts from Nissan at CES (IMx) and NAIAS (Xmotion), but as usual, its Leaf EV is quietly a story as well. The revamped electric vehicle is weeks away from going on sale, and the company tells Engadget...