Menacing Lamborghini-inspired automotives that perfectly capture the brand’s raging bull spirit

When it comes to luxury sports cars, Lamborghini is always at the top of the list! For decades, the automobile manufacturer has got our hearts racing with its menacing Automotives and their ingenious designs. From the original Lamborghini 350 GT to the Lamborghini Huracán STO, each and every model has been high on innovation, authenticity, and of course killer speed. Their cars have been a source of major inspiration for automobile designers and enthusiasts all over the world! The result? A never-ending plethora of Lamborghini-inspired concepts that’ll have you itching for more. From the Lamborghini Navetta Volante concept which is the Italian version of the Tesla Model S to a Batmobile-inspired Lamborghini – these groundbreaking concepts will have you wishing that Lamborghini adopts and turns them into a reality very soon!

1. Yale

Titled rather simply ‘Yale’, Wanoco4D mentions that the inspiration for this automobile came from both the Batmobile as well as James Bond’s car. Although one could argue that one source of inspiration really overshadows the other, the Yale does have a faceted, armored design that seems highly reminiscent of Christian Bale’s Bat-suit, with its chiseled, split-surface design. There aren’t too many details on the car’s specifics, especially considering it’s a concept, but a few observations include the car’s gullwing-style doors, the rear-hatch that opens outwards probably to allow Batman to make a quick vertical entry or exit, and a turret-gun in the back in one of Wanoco4D’s versions.

2. The Navetta Volante

With its edgy Urus-meets-Model-S design, the Navetta Volante concept is the perfect blend between Lamborghini’s raging-bull sports cars and a street-friendly high-end sedan. The concept comes from the mind of Jamil Ahmed, an automotive designer whose love affair with the Lamborghini brand started when he saw Diablo for the first time back when he was younger. The Navetta Volante, which translates to Flying Shuttle, comes with a 2+2 design (hence the term Shuttle) and feels like a cross between the Urus, and what Jamil cites as his true inspiration for the car, a lesser-known Lamborghini concept from 2008 – the Estoque.

3. The Xeno

Designed to be a rare type of Lamborghini, Aven Shi envisioned the Xeno as an electric hypercar that’s also meant to go off roads if necessary. Its ground clearance is marginally higher, given this ability, and when compared to the Huracan (at the end of the piece), the Xeno has a shorter nose and a longer rear. Unlike the Huracan, the Xeno has scissor doors that open to reveal the car’s two-person cockpit inside. The car comes with what looks like a two-part battery that sits right under the driver, and a four-wheel drive, giving you ample storage in the front as well as the back.

4. The Massacre Concept

Lamborghini Massacre Concept by Krishnakanta Saikhom

Lamborghini Massacre Concept by Krishnakanta Saikhom

The Massacre Concept aims at toning it down and creating a car that’s both futuristic yet true to Lamborghini’s visual language. The concept automobile boasts of a design inspired by the Russian Sukhoi Su-57, the first fighter jet to rely on stealth technology. Just like the fighter jet, the car boasts of a slightly pointed nose that helps to cut the air as the vehicle speeds forward, while carbon-fiber flaps located at the base of the car’s A-pillar help it maneuver just like a fighter jet would. The car even comes with a cockpit-style single seat to give the driver the impression of maneuvering a jet plane… but on land.

5. The SDAP

Rather mysteriously titled the SDAP, this little concept car from Mexico-based designer E. Maximiliano Salas was designed to be equal parts exotic and enigmatic… although its 80s automotive references are all too common.  With pop-up headlights that are a grand reference to a bygone era of supercars, the SDAP has a little Countach and Diablo, and a little ’84 F40 mixed into it, making it quite the eclectic beast.  The dark-ish rendering isn’t by accident either, Salas wanted his unusual concept to have a little waiting-in-the-shadows vibe to it, harking back to yet another phenomenon of the 80s, the reveal of the time-traveling DeLorean in the film Back To The Future.

6. The Marzal Concept

Designed by Parisian designer Andrej Suchov using Gravity Sketch, the Marzal concept is a confluence of sorts, created to be a vehicle that can shine on the tarmac but isn’t scared of leaving its comfort zone to dominate rough terrain. Its profile certainly captures the signature Lamborghini silhouette, with its iconic wedge-shaped design… however with higher ground clearance, a  larger rear, and bigger tires designed to handle rough roads. It’s quite rare to see a Lamborghini with a rear windshield, and the Marzal boasts of that too, although it does get blocked when you include the storage unit. With its aggressive design styling and that iconic yellow color, the Marzal looks every bit like something Lamborghini would make – a testament to the company’s strong visual language.

7. The Lamborghini LMXX2

Emerging out of a Mad Max-ian hellscape, the Lamborghini LMXX2 looks like it could outrun any of Immortan Joe’s minion riders, leaving them literally and figuratively in the dust. Hritzkrieg (who’s also in the running for the coolest last name) uses just three words to describe his design – Desert + Lambo + Future. He isn’t wrong, the LMXX2 looks rather futuristic, to begin with, and since Lamborghini’s already dominated the roads and even the water, this just seems like a natural progression at this point. I’ll be waiting for the Lamborghini hypersonic jets…

8. The SC18

The SC18 comes from Lamborghini’s Squadra Corse division, which literally translates to “racing team”. This car isn’t meant for streets, it’s meant for tracks, and it comes with a dominating design to match. Slightly a step down from Terzo Millennio’s absolutely aggressive style, the SC18 still looks like it would unleash hell on the track. The SC18 is a one-off model, crafted bespoke for a motorsports customer, in synergy with Centro Stile Lamborghini, the car company’s innovative studio that looks to further develop Lamborghini’s inimitable style through endless exploration. It features air intakes in the style of the Huracán GT3 EVO with side and rear fenders designed to look like the Huracan Super Trofeo EVO, while its headlights look distinctly like the Aventador (the taillights are a hat-tip to the Huracan too).

9. The Lamborghini E_X

An electric Lamborghini needs to be ferocious, but not in the same way a gasoline-powered Lamborghini is… a design brief Andrea Ortile hopes to demonstrate and explore with his conceptual electric Lamborghini E_X. Unlike fuel-powered engines, which have a reputation for being dirty energy, electric drivetrains are much cleaner, from a sustainability and impact perspective. This very distinction carries forward to the Lamborghini E_X, which comes with a clean, pristine design that’s characterized by two swooping lines that define its side profile. The E_X balances this clean minimalism very well with its signature raging-bull aggressive demeanor. The car’s aesthetic edginess isn’t too literal, but its incredibly slim headlights sure give it that angry appearance.

10. Forsennato

Designed as a tribute to Lamborghini’s incredible brand DNA and some spectacular-looking automobiles, as well as a reminder of all the good work the company has done developing their supercar aesthetic, this is the Forsennato, a conceptual car created by Dmitry Lazarev, that combines the best parts of Lamborghini’s designs from the past couple of years. At first glance, you see headlights that are a hat tip to the unconventional line-based headlights of the Terzo Millennio, while the entire front profile definitely reminds one of the Aventador with a little extra edginess. The taillights follow the design direction set by the Veneno and are carried forward with the Terzo Millennio.

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This Lamborghini wasn’t made to run on roads…

With treads similar to those you’d find on a tank, the Lamborghini LMXX2 by Michael Hritzkrieg was designed to dominate off-road terrains. Made to run on sands, soil, and even rocks, this raging bull doesn’t need asphalt underneath it. It just needs a driver and determination.

Emerging out of a Mad Max-ian hellscape, the Lamborghini LMXX2 looks like it could outrun any of Immortan Joe’s minion riders, leaving them literally and figuratively in the dust. Hritzkrieg (who’s also in the running for coolest last name) uses just three words to describe his design – Desert + Lambo + Future. He isn’t wrong, the LMXX2 looks rather futuristic to begin with, and since Lamborghini’s already dominated the roads and even the water, this just seems like a natural progression at this point. I’ll be waiting for the Lamborghini hypersonic jets…

Designer: Michael Hritzkrieg

The Lamborghini LMXX2 was created for the AGP Contest on Instagram, using the same keywords “Desert + Lamborghini + Future”. Modeled/sketched on Gravity Sketch before rendering in Cinema4D and adding finishing touches on Photoshop, the LMXX2 comes alive as a beast of the sands, leaving a trail of dust and sore losers behind it. The LMXX2 amps up Lamborghini’s already angular design, and ditches regular wheels for something even more edgy and badass. Treads run around the edge of the car, covering the base and the upper edges of the windows, creating a dynamic side profile that actually requires you to enter and exit the car through its treads. The treads aren’t your average ones either – they come with flaps that dig into the soil, propelling you forward. When out of the soil, the treads look almost like scales, giving the LMXX2 the appearance of a reptile ready to attack!

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This robot-powered gaming chair looks so comfy that you might want to sleep on it

We’ve recently seen a rise in gaming chairs that would make your gaming desktop rig cry. To call them a chair might be an understatement, especially since they look more like elaborate, extravagant, and over-the-top lounges outfitted with everything you need to play games and not get up except for bodily necessities. While those chairs almost always advertise gaming comfort, they honestly look more like hard and cold traps designed to keep you from getting up and finishing your games. In contrast, you might never want to get up from this gaming chair concept, but only because it might be too comfortable and too soothing to leave. And to arrive at that kind of experience, the designers took inspiration from the most unlikely source, a supercar like a Lamborghini.

Designers: Ryan Kim, Yaeji Hong, Dongwoo Han

Gaming and cars don’t really have much in common unless you consider the concept of speed that’s associated with both machines. That’s not to say they can’t learn from each other, and cars today are getting more technologically sophisticated, running on powerful computers that might also be found in PCs. The Moiin Robodesk Gaming Chair concept takes the sharing in the other direction, with car aesthetics informing how a gaming chair could harmoniously blend contrasting elements of warmth and cold, comfort and performance.

The chair part of the Moiin, for example, has the same leather materials that Lamborghini would use on the seats of its supercars. While existing gaming chairs do have cushions and soft materials to offer comfort to the gamer, this goes over and beyond the call of duty. And if that weren’t enough, the chair is actually a massage chair that could help soothe those aching backs and shoulders from hours of gaming on end. Not that you should be playing games for hours on end in the first place.

The gaming part isn’t going to be left behind and will easily remind people of the sleek and shiny surfaces of high-end sports cars. LED lights around some edges give it that gamer aesthetic that makes it look equally futuristic, but the polished appearance of the “colder” parts of the setup actually complements the warmer personality of the leather-wrapped chair quite nicely. It’s a harmony of opposites that you’d find so executed so perfectly in sportscars and supercars.

That isn’t the end of the wonders of this gaming machine, though. If that monitor and keyboard stand looks more like a robot arm to you, you aren’t that far off. Rather than burden gamers with having to manually adjust the chair to their comfort, the robotic arm does all the work for them, leaning in and back as needed. It’s the ultimate reclining chair comfort made just as smart and as sophisticated as the gaming machine that it’s running.

Of course, there might be some concerns about whether making gaming too comfortable could lead to an even more sedentary lifestyle. At the same time, gamers might have the worst postures of all computer users, and having a desk and chair combo that not only encourages ergonomics but also adds comfort could at least help give their bodies a bit of a break. Admittedly, Moiin’s aesthetics might not appeal to all gamers, but those that love supercars and the Lamborghini design style might have found heaven in this concept.

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This is what the redesigned Lamborghini Countach should have actually looked like

Rather mysteriously titled the SDAP, this little concept car from Mexico-based designer E. Maximiliano Salas was designed to be equal parts exotic and enigmatic… although its 80s automotive references are all too common.  With pop-up headlights that are a grand reference to a bygone era of supercars, the SDAP has a little Countach and Diablo, and a little ’84 F40 mixed into it, making it quite the eclectic beast.  The dark-ish rendering isn’t by accident either, Salas wanted his unusual concept to have a little waiting-in-the-shadows vibe to it, harking back to yet another phenomenon of the 80s, the reveal of the time-traveling DeLorean in the film Back To The Future.

Designer: E. Maximiliano Salas

Salas’ design doesn’t give us much to work with as far as a text description goes, but the images speak a lot for themselves. In trying to modernize the Countach and F40, Salas took the route that most modern cars tend to take with their design – a minimal approach with form and color, giving the car a certain raw, edgy, cyberpunkish appeal. I wouldn’t outright say that the car is trying to be a lithe version of a Cybertruck, but the silver body, the use of prominent edge lines, ad that flat rear with the LED-strip taillight says otherwise. In a lot of ways the rear references the F40’s flat rear surface, while the front boasts of concealed pop-up headlights that feel like a spiritual successor to the F40 and the Countach. That logo on the hood also looks rather a lot like the aforementioned brands too.

What catches my eye instantly is the car’s surfacing, which definitely feels modern more than anything. SDAP’s contours are MUCH more refined and tight, almost looking like a wind tunnel test was brought to life. That side profile is perhaps the most beautiful part of the car, with how the waistline moves from the front to the back. The front has a signature wedge shape that obviously gets resolved as you reach the first wheel. However, the line then curves downwards just to tease the viewer, and then upwards finally before trailing off at the end. Even in the render below, you can clearly see the two edge lines on the hood moving backward and taking a beautiful dramatic curve near the windshield. Sure, there isn’t an abundance of accent lines, cutouts, vents, or any extraneous details on the SDAP. It’s minimalist in almost every sense, yet it does a phenomenal job with what it has, resulting in a car that definitely looks like a modern take on the Countach or the 1984 Ferrari F40.

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2021 Lamborghini Huracán STO Review

When subtlety was being handed out, the Lamborghini Huracán STO was at the back of the line napping. Actually no, that’s not true. It had snuck away from the queue and darted to a nearby race track to get an injection of steroids and a full race car cosmetic makeover.

Because that’s what this car is all about. Loud to look at and loud at 8500 revs. It’s basically a street-legal race car. With its ultra-low sleek profile, huge air intakes, massive rear wing, and screaming V10 engine, this model is the most eye-opening Huracán and best handling yet. Descended from the DNA of the Lamborghini Super Trofeo one-make series—hence the ‘STO’ name that stands for Super Trofeo Omologata (Italian for Homologation)—this hypercar is more tailored to track use than city driving. Much more.

Thanks to Lamborghini Japan, I was able to test the STO’s raw performance in the most thrilling way there is—flying at 180 mph down the main straight at Fuji Speedway, an ex-F1 track 90 minutes south of Tokyo with one of the longest straightaways in motorsport, at nearly one mile in length. The only thought I had as the car cleared 170 mph was, “Crikey, I hope the brakes work.” They did. Magnificently.





A Hardcore Lamborghini Turned Up To 11

Launched in 2014, the original Huracán was already seen as a shocking, edgy, beautiful, inspired piece of kinetic design, something that composer Igor Stravinsky might have conceived if he was into car styling. The half a dozen Huracán STO models that awaited me in the pit lane took that reality to a whole new level. These highly-strung works of automotive art—kind of like Stravinsky’s stylistic diversity meets Pablo Picasso’s cubism meets the color explosion of Andy Warhol’s ‘Marilyn Monroe’ screenprint—were nothing short of jaw-dropping, purveyors of an assault on all five senses that would linger for days after the drive.

But before I could get behind the wheel of these epic machines, I had time to take in their race car-inspired exterior, multiple color schemes, and extreme aerodynamics. There are six color combinations that highlight the sleek lines and edges of the STO. While you can get the car in matt grey and yellow, white and blue, dark red and grey, lime green and orange, my favorite is the version with the light blue and orange Gulf Racing-inspired colors. Lamborghini designers must have thought long and hard about these six colors schemes because they really do highlight the extreme body aeroparts of the STO, making the cars look more like ready-made race cars than street legal supercars.

The STO is a rear-wheel only Huracán that is some 95-lbs lighter than the Huracán Performante, an already significantly tweaked Huracán upgrade that came out several years ago. This STO however, has gone straight for the jugular vein of its racing pedigree brother and borrowed design and technology generously from the Huracán Super Trofeo Evo model from the one-make race series. Okay, it might get the same non-hybrid, non-turbocharged 631-hp 5.2-liter V10 engine as the Performante, but in every other department, the volume has been turned up to 11.

Being biased towards track performance, the STO had to be as light but as strong and rigid at high speed as possible. To minimize weight but maximize rigidity, the STO employs magnesium wheels, extra weight-saving carbon fiber body panels, a thinner windscreen, and a one-piece hood bumper and rear diffuser. One of the impressive innovations in this special version is that one-piece front clamshell hood or ‘cofango’ in Lamborghini speak. This catchy term is a hybrid between the Italian words for ‘cofano’ (hood) and ‘parafango’ (fender). Featuring large built-in apertures, the combined hood and front bumper minimize weight and enhance aerodynamics.

Surprisingly, the switch from Performante’s four-wheel-drive setup to the STO’s rear-wheel drive has only saved 44 lbs. Some 18 lbs have been added however through its active rear-steering system, taking the car’s kerb weight to 2,952 lbs.

The Driving Experience

The STO also had to be as slippery through the air as it could be while maximizing downforce, and in turn, rear wheel grip. That’s where the front splitter, race-spec rear wing, flat underbody, and diffuser combine to deliver unprecedented front and rear-end downforce, up 53% over the Performante. That translates to around 950 lbs of downforce at 175 mph which is like having three sumo wrestlers sitting on your rear wing as you reach maximum velocity. For the record, the STO has a reported top speed of 200-mph.

Meanwhile, to generate the best possible cooling efficiency for its mid-engined V10 powerplant and brakes, the STO is graced with sizable air ducts, snorkels, and vents. The side air scoops and roof vent helps to force air into the rear engine bay to cool the naturally aspirated engine while the front air ducts pump air to the wheel arches to cool the huge Brembo CCM-R brake calipers and rotors which is short for ‘carbon-ceramic material for the racing market.’

The beauty of these brakes is that they are lightweight yet work brilliantly to dissipate heat and stop the car on a dime. For a driver, it’s so reassuring and confidence-building to know that when you stomp on the brake pedal at 180-mph, the car will pull up quickly and efficiently with no drama and no brake fade. And when combined with the specially made Bridgestone Potenza tires, this Huracán pulls up effortlessly.





But it’s in the corners where those supremely grippy tires come into their own. As the steering turns in with pinpoint sharpness and excellent feel thanks to the active rear steer feature, the Bridgestones masterfully relay the car’s massive downforce to the tarmac to deliver cornering speeds almost on a par with Super Trofeo race cars. The G-forces you feel in the corners are about as much as most untrained drivers could bear for prolonged periods behind the wheel. That’s how brutal and talented this car is.

You can’t speak about the visceral nature of the STO without focusing on its heart—that luscious V10 engine. It completely dominates the driving experience, as it should. The STO’s 5.2-liter V10 motor doles out power like Jeff Bezos doles out millions to fund his Blue Origin space tourism company—seemingly without limits and in a very flamboyant manner. Bury your right boot and the rear tires chirp and squeal as they fight for grip. In around 3 seconds you’re already doing 60-mph and within 9 seconds you’ve cleared 124-mph. Power delivery is instant, immense, silky smooth, linear, and loud. Very loud.

With 417 pound-feet of torque, the V10 roar from 4000 rpms to the 8500 redline is truly addictive. How often in life do you have an expectation of something prodigious and magical and have that expectation answered every 3-5 seconds, for as long as you’re in the car. Flatten the throttle for 3 seconds, change into 2nd, accelerate for 3 seconds more, change into 3rd, and with every shift, you’re being literally swallowed by a beefy, bassy, operatic Lamborghini soundtrack turned up to 11. It’s sublime and habit forming.





And thank God for those paddle shifters. Unashamedly I found myself reaching for the paddles more than I should just to indulge myself by changing down and then changing up, just so I could change down again. I couldn’t decide if I liked the sound of that ferocious engine more accelerating or decelerating through the gears. It’s like would I rather listen to AC/DC’s Highway To Hell or Deep Purple’s Highway Star? A difficult choice. 

But ah, those flappy paddle shifters. Works of art. Their size, shape, and touch make them some of the best positioned, most responsive paddles I’ve ever experienced on any supercar. And the 7-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox is not only lightning quick in its shift schedule but it’s perfectly matched to the powerband of the  V10.

To further enhance the driving experience, the STO comes with three drive modes, STO (normal), Trofeo (track), and Pioggia (Wet). Starting in STO mode, I pushed the car hard and came out of my first two laps very happy with the result. Then I switched it to Trofeo for an instant and was surprised to see the character of the car change considerably and become even more laser-focused and extreme. If you are brave enough to flick the switch to ‘Trofeo,’ you’d better be ready for some tail-happy shenanigans exiting the corners. The suspension will stiffen up, the throttle will become more responsive and the steering gets sharper while dialing down traction control. This will allow for some oversteer tendencies that require lightning-fast correction. That’s why our Lamborghini hosts suggested that we leave the car in STO. After three corners, I switched it back to STO.

So yes, the STO is quick, corners like a race car, and sounds ballistic. But it only has 631-hp. Only, you say? When compared to its rivals, the Huracán’s V10 has been pretty much squeezed to the upper limit of its power potential, making it play second fiddle to the likes of Porsche and McLaren whose turbocharged engines generate significantly more power. What the STO may lack in power when compared to say the 700-hp Porsche GT2 RS or the 754-hp McLaren 675LT, it certainly makes up for in on-track performance. This Huracán is able to go into and out of a corner faster than any supercar I’ve ever driven.

I’ve piloted Lamborghini Huracáns and Aventadors, and McLarens and Ferraris on tracks at high speed, and I’d have to say that this is the most fun I’ve ever had in a road-going car. It gets the blood pumping with its visual eccentricities ever before you squeeze into its tight cockpit. Once on board, the adrenalin kicks in another notch. As you flick your way through 1st, 2nd, and 3rd gears and approach 110 mph, the melodic resonance of the thumping engine parked just 20 inches behind your right ear is like having legendary tenor Luciano Pavarotti hitting the high note in Nessun Dorma in the seat next to you. Repeatedly.

The cabin is spartan but luxurious by comparison to the Performante, with acres of exposed carbon-fiber surfaces, an Alcantara-wrapped dashboard and to save even more weight, bright red pull straps in place of standard door handles. The race-style bucket seats can be adjusted manually for height and angle, and the full digital display is clear and easy to read. To be honest, it was a little tight in the driver’s seat with a helmet on, but without that brain bucket, even a 6-foot 2-inch tall driver like me has enough headroom to manage those G-forces.

A central touchscreen interface remains and has been reconfigured to provide a wealth of data options, including things like individual tire pressures and braking temperatures. It also has one that will automatically prompt gear selections when approaching corners on circuits catalogued in its memory. Unlike most hardcore track-focused cars, the STO retains its climate control system but does away with carpet, replacing that with lightweight rubber mats.

The STO also boasts a comprehensive race-inspired, on-board telemetry system, able to log data and record videos that can be uploaded to an app. According to Lamborghini, the official line for this telemetry is to help owners polish up their driving skills, but the ability to share your track day results with fellow racers is likely to generate greater interest.

Pricing and Options

Boasting a base price of $327,838, the STO’s substantial and expensive options list can quickly have your wallet pushing $400,000. For the full carbon fiber pack, just add on $26,000, or $4,000 for the front lift system or an extra $14,000 for a pearl-effect white paint job. Even those image-enhancing STO stickers on the side of the car will knock you back over $4,000. And that’s less than one-third of the options list.

This STO is by no means a gimmick. It’s the real deal. It’s a road car with the pedigree and capability of a race car. What it may lack in power compared to its rivals, it more than makes up for in the on-track handling and fun factor department. Whether it’s the extreme exterior, the prodigious acceleration, on-the-rails cornering or that operatic V10 soundtrack, the STO is a must-have for anyone who wants a top track-focused racer and has a spare $400,000 stashed down the back of the sofa.









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The outrageous Lamborghini Xeno concept looks like it would make regular hypercars run back to their mommies





Designed to look like a Terzo Millennio mated with a Cybertruck, the Lamborghini Xeno doesn’t feel like a fun car for fun-loving people. It’s built to show off, to dominate, and to put fear into the hearts of other drivers. The Xeno’s design comes from concept artist Aven Shi, who put together the video above. Go ahead and hit the power button to feel the adrenaline through your screen. If nothing, just the sound of the electric drivetrain should absolutely drive you wild.

Designed to be a rare type of Lamborghini, Aven Shi envisioned the Xeno as an electric hypercar that’s also meant to go off roads if necessary. Its ground clearance is marginally higher, given this ability, and when compared to the Huracan (at the end of the piece), the Xeno has a shorter nose and a longer rear. Unlike the Huracan, the Xeno has scissor doors that open to reveal the car’s two-person cockpit inside. The car comes with what looks like a two-part battery that sits right under the driver, and a four-wheel drive, giving you ample storage in the front as well as the back.

The Xeno concept sports an incredibly chiseled body, with angular surfacing that feels a lot like the Sián on steroids. Its low-poly design definitely echoes a bit of Cybertruck inspiration, and the car’s abundance of air-intakes, its forward stance, and the integrated spoiler that pops off the rear makes the Xeno look every bit the asphalt demon. In true Lambo fashion though, the Xeno doesn’t come with a rear windshield, and sports those inverted Y headlights and taillights that car enthusiasts (and even regular people) have come to love about and instantly associate with the raging bull brand. It’s a shame the Xeno is just a fan-made concept… because there isn’t much I wouldn’t give to see an off-road hypercar with the terrifying roar of an electric Lamborghini!

Designer: Aven Shi

Sleek Lamborghini-inspired automotive concepts designed to perfectly capture the brand’s raging bull spirit!

When it comes to luxury sports cars, Lamborghini is always at the top of the list! For decades, the automobile manufacturer has got our heart racing with its menacing Automotives and their ingenious designs. From the original Lamborghini 350 GT to its latest  SUV -the Lamborghini Urus, each and every model has been high on innovation, authenticity, and of course killer speed. Their cars have been a source of major inspiration for automobile designers and enthusiasts all over the world! The result? A never-ending plethora of Lamborghini-inspired concepts that’ll have you itching for more. From the Lamborghini Navetta Volante concept which is the Italian version of the Tesla Model S to a stunning Lamborghini Marzal concept – these groundbreaking concepts will have you wishing that Lamborghini adopts and turns them into a reality very soon!

With its edgy Urus-meets-Model-S design, the Navetta Volante concept is the perfect blend between Lamborghini’s raging-bull sports cars and a street-friendly high-end sedan. The concept comes from the mind of Jamil Ahmed, an automotive designer whose love affair with the Lamborghini brand started when he saw Diablo for the first time back when he was younger. The Navetta Volante, which translates to Flying Shuttle, comes with a 2+2 design (hence the term Shuttle) and feels like a cross between the Urus, and what Jamil cites as his true inspiration for the car, a lesser-known Lamborghini concept from 2008 – the Estoque.

Lamborghini Massacre Concept by Krishnakanta Saikhom

Lamborghini Massacre Concept by Krishnakanta Saikhom

The Massacre Concept aims at toning it down and creating a car that’s both futuristic yet true to Lamborghini’s visual language. The concept automobile boasts of a design inspired by the Russian Sukhoi Su-57, the first fighter jet to rely on stealth technology. Just like the fighter jet, the car boasts of a slightly pointed nose that helps to cut the air as the vehicle speeds forward, while carbon-fiber flaps located at the base of the car’s A-pillar help it maneuver just like a fighter jet would. The car even comes with a cockpit-style single seat to give the driver the impression of maneuvering a jet plane… but on land.

Designed by Parisian designer Andrej Suchov using Gravity Sketch, the Marzal concept is a confluence of sorts, created to be a vehicle that can shine on the tarmac but isn’t scared of leaving its comfort zone to dominate rough terrain. Its profile certainly captures the signature Lamborghini silhouette, with its iconic wedge-shaped design… however with higher ground clearance, a  larger rear, and bigger tires designed to handle rough roads. It’s quite rare to see a Lamborghini with a rear windshield, and the Marzal boasts of that too, although it does get blocked when you include the storage unit. With its aggressive design styling and that iconic yellow color, the Marzal looks every bit like something Lamborghini would make – a testament to the company’s strong visual language.

Designed by Milton Tanabe, the Lamborghini Tornado is a personal concept that aims at envisioning how Lamborghini’s form language would evolve if the car transitioned from a fuel engine to an electric powertrain. Given that electric cars are usually perceived as ‘cleaner’ than gas-guzzling automobiles, it’s fitting that the Tornado comes with clean surfacing along with an edgy, bordering-on-low-poly design. The car’s triangular headlights are a major contributing factor to its Lamborghini-ness, sort of resembling the Aventador’s front lights, and the edge-lit inverted Y-shaped lights instantly remind me of the hybrid-engine-powered Lamborghini Sian.

Meet the E.V.E. Countach, a Lamborghini with strong Back To The Future vibes. Envisioned by Khyzyl Saleem, the car comes designed for the year 2090 and packs airless tires, DeLorean-style thrusters that lead me to believe the car is a portal into the past and future, and perhaps the most important detail, a cockpit with no space for a driver, because the E.V.E. Countach is capable of navigating the four dimensions on its own. The car comes with an edgy aggressive design that can be attributed to Lamborghini’s DNA, but with a touch of the Cybertruck. A metallic paint job, edge-lit headlamps and taillights, and exaggerated polygonal body panels give the Lamborghini a strong Brubaker-meets-Tesla appeal. The concept automobile seats just one, but it’s sure to give you quite the ride.

Designed as a tribute to Lamborghini’s incredible brand DNA and some spectacular looking automobiles, as well as a reminder of all the good work the company has done developing their supercar aesthetic, this is the Forsennato, a conceptual car created by Dmitry Lazarev, that combines the best parts of Lamborghini’s designs from the past couple of years. At first glance, you see headlights that are a hat tip to the unconventional line-based headlights of the Terzo Millennio, while the entire front profile definitely reminds one of the Aventador with a little extra edginess. The taillights follow the design direction set by the Veneno and are carried forward with the Terzo Millennio.

THIS concept car doesn’t have a name as wicked as a hurricane, but it is pretty intimidating. The Lamborghini Verdugo, or the Lamborghini Executioner, is designed and named to strike fear into the hearts of other car companies! Taking inspiration from the arrow, a projectile known for its incredible escape velocity, the Verdugo is designed to look like an incredibly rapid shard that reaches breakneck speeds quietly (arrows don’t make any noise either). The Verdugo’s body is envisioned to be made out of Graphene infused Carbon Fiber, a material that has one of the highest strength-to-weight ratios known to mankind, and makes clever use of the SV (SuperVeloce) graphic by incorporating the S design into the side vent detail. Plus, would you look at those absolutely wicked headlamps!

The SC18 comes from Lamborghini’s Squadra Corse division, which literally translates to “racing team”. This car isn’t meant for streets, it’s meant for tracks, and it comes with a dominating design to match. Slightly a step down from Terzo Millennio’s absolutely aggressive style, the SC18 still looks like it would unleash hell on the track. The SC18 is a one-off model, crafted bespoke for a motorsports customer, in synergy with Centro Stile Lamborghini, the car company’s innovative studio that looks to further develop Lamborghini’s inimitable style through endless exploration. It features air intakes in the style of the Huracán GT3 EVO with side and rear fenders designed to look like the Huracan Super Trofeo EVO, while its headlights look distinctly like the Aventador (the taillights are a hat-tip to the Huracan too).

An electric Lamborghini needs to be ferocious, but not in the same way a gasoline-powered Lamborghini is… a design brief Andrea Ortile hopes to demonstrate and explore with his conceptual electric Lamborghini E_X. Unlike fuel-powered engines, which have a reputation for being dirty energy, electric drivetrains are much cleaner, from a sustainability and impact perspective. This very distinction carries forward to the Lamborghini E_X, which comes with a clean, pristine design that’s characterized by two swooping lines that define its side profile. The E_X balances this clean minimalism very well with its signature raging-bull aggressive demeanor. The car’s aesthetic edginess isn’t too literal, but its incredibly slim headlights sure give it that angry appearance.

The chances of Lamborghini making a pickup truck are about as good as us colonizing Mars! Just for kicks, the Lambo Mars X1 explores both! Designed for future martian dwellers, this ultramodern pickup truck features all the fixings needed to rover the red planet. Whether it’s for collecting soil samples or storing medical supplies, this vehicle is all about storage. Aside from its main bed, which can be used for hauling larger items, it has all sorts of nooks and crannies for maximizing unused space. This even includes the wheels which feature built-in storage in the center. The large mecanum wheels are not only capable of covering rough terrain forwards and backward but also allow the vehicle to move or turn in any direction on the spot. Each operates independently. For enhanced maneuverability, the body is also flexible and capable of stretching or becoming more compact when necessary.

The Lamborghini Navetta Volante concept is what you get when the Italians decide to make their version of the Tesla Model S

With its edgy Urus-meets-Model-S design, the Navetta Volante concept is the perfect blend between Lamborghini’s raging-bull sports cars and a street-friendly high-end sedan. The concept comes from the mind of Jamil Ahmed, an automotive designer who’s love-affair with the Lamborghini brand started when he saw a Diablo for the first time back when he was younger. The Navetta Volante, which translates to Flying Shuttle, comes with a 2+2 design (hence the term Shuttle) and feels like a cross between the Urus, and what Jamil cites as his true inspiration for the car, a lesser-known Lamborghini concept from 2008 – the Estoque.

The Estoque came as quite a surprise in 2008, since it was a clear deviation from what Lamborghini had built its reputation on – 2-door sportscars. The first-ever 4-door modern Lamborghini to be unveiled to the public, the Estoque never made it to production, however the chairman of Lamborghini, Stephan Winkelmann was spotted saying that they hadn’t ruled out a 4-door Lamborghini in the future. A decade later, the company launched Urus – a 4-door SUV aimed at diversifying Lamborghini’s lineup. Jamil’s Navetta Volante concept sits square between the Estoque and the Urus – borrowing the super-saloon proportions from the former, and the design language from the latter.

Jamil clearly sees the Estoque as Lamborghini’s missed opportunity to build a street-friendly car for the average joe (with the right amounts of money to spend). “I believe at the time of the Estoque, 4 door super saloons were quite interesting and I guess it would have fit very well along with the Rapide, Panamera, and Quattroporte”, Jamil casually mentions. The Navetta Volante, however, represents what the Estoque would evolve into in today’s day and age. The designer imagines it with a Plug-In Hybrid Drivetrain, pitting it against other hybrid cars, and taking aim at Tesla’s own Model S – which holds the coveted spot among today’s super-saloons. “As we merge rapidly into the electric era, we know Lamborghini will have to make the transition at some point, I knew the Navetta Volante platform would be perfect for that transition due to its practical nature.”

Running on a hybrid powertrain, the car comes with the signature large air-intakes underneath Y-shaped headlights (both iconic Lamborghini features). It sports two charging ports, one on each side underneath the rear-view mirrors, making it convenient to charge your car no matter where the power station is located.

The taillights present a unique deviation. Unlike the Estoque or Urus’ Y-shaped taillights, the Navetta Volante uses three hexagonal shapes, staying square within Lamborghini’s language while clearly thinking outside the box.

Clearly built for a variety of scenarios (other than racing), the car comes with a skylight on the top, and the designer’s even visualized what the Navetta Volante would look like with a luggage carrier on the top. One would argue that any sort of consumer-based embellishment corrupts the car’s bad-boy attitude, but then again, the Navetta Volante wasn’t designed for the race track – it was made for streets, roads, and highways. Even for its broad approach, the Navetta Volante looks like it has the spirit of the raging bull in it. Its edgy, racy design would arguably put the Tesla Model S to shame… now if only Lamborghini built the damn thing!

Designer: Jamil Ahmed

With its Huracan-inspired body and the Miura’s eyelashes, the 7X Rayo is the Lamborghini mashup we never knew we needed





Making its grand appearance at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance event this year, the Rayo from 7X Design and Envisage Group is a one-off 1,800 HP machine based on the Huracan. The Rayo notably boasts of a slightly softer, curvier form language than its Lamborghini counterpart, but that doesn’t take away from exactly how much of an edgy badass it looks like. The car comes in a deep orange, and while it looks 90% like the Huracan, 10% of its origin goes to the Miura-inspired eyelashes built into those stunning headlights!

The Rayo isn’t just a custom makeover, it was designed to do what the Huracan couldn’t – hit a top speed of 300 mph (482 km/h). The redesigned body takes the Huracan’s aesthetic and softens it just a bit, introducing gentle curves in all the right places. While this makes the Rayo look easier on the eyes, it helps the car perform better too. The car’s made to be lighter, thanks to carbon fiber paneling, and the new, curved design helps bring down the drag coefficient from 0.39 down to an impressive 0.279.

Among the key new design features is an overhauled front with a more pronounced nose and a rounded profile (unlike the Huracan’s jagged outline). The new engine cover and rear end also play a significant part in improving the car’s drag coefficient.

The car is powered by a 5.2-liter V10 that was assembled by America-based Underground Racing. It comes with a pair of turbochargers attached, bringing the Rayo to an extraordinary 1,874 HP.

The car’s overall design is a collaborative effort between 7X Design and Envisage. 7X took charge of visualizing the Rayo from top to bottom, while Envisage Group helped fabricate the Rayo’s immaculate carbon-fiber bodywork and helped assemble the car too. In addition, Envisage Group also painted the vehicle in Sport Orange in an advanced paint technologies division.

While there hasn’t been much official chit-chat on the final price of the Rayo, 7X had quoted $2 million (plus the cost of the donor car) for its previous project – a Ferrari 488 GTB-based GTO Vision. I imagine by that standard, a Rayo doesn’t come cheap!

Designers: 7X Design & Envisage Group

This off-road Lamborghini Huracan looks like an absolutely bonkers concept right out of Mad max





It’s not every day that you find yourself with a spare Lamborghini Huracan chassis to tinker with. However, when you do, you better make the most of it. Meet the Jumpacan, a brain-meltingly insane custom off-road build created by the guys at B Is For Build, using a spare Huracan chassis provided to them by Mullins Auto Parts. It isn’t often that you see a Lamborghini racing on rough, rocky terrain, so this one should be quite a treat.

Looking like something right out of Mad Max: Fury Road, the Jumpacan features a gnarly exposed front, monster wheels, and a gravity-defying suspension system to match. Funnily enough, the doors still open vertically in the scissor style, almost as a reminder that this once used to be a luxury Italian supercar that’s now living its second life as a dune-jumping, dirt-covered monster that isn’t afraid of a few bumps in the road. The video above is a live demonstration of the Jumpacan on the Mint 400 track on the outskirts of Vegas, and behind the wheel is Chris Steinbacher from B Is For Build, taking his oddball creation for a quick spin.

Jumpacan - Lamborghini Huracan Custom Off-Roader

The chassis came from a burnt Huracan that was destined to be scrapped for parts, but B Is For Build decided to resurrect it instead. They fitted it with an LS V8 engine and a manual gearbox, 37-inch rear off-road tires, and Rotiform wheels. Other modifications to the Jumpacan include a long-travel suspension, top-mounted radiator with a roof scoop, a racing-derived fuel cell, a prominent roll cage, and the brakes from a Ford Mustang Shelby GT500, resulting in the Frankenstein’s monster-equivalent of an automobile.

Jumpacan - Lamborghini Huracan Custom Off-Roader

Aside from the doors, there’s absolutely no shred of evidence of the car’s Lamborghini origins. The headlights, taillights, and logos aren’t really there anymore, and B Is For Build even switched out the steering wheel for a three-spoke LZMFG steering wheel. However, the way the car glides across surfaces, jumps off rocks, and absolutely dominates the terrain, there’s no doubt that it still possesses the raging bull spirit on the inside!

After running a test lap on the Mint 400 track, the car’s heading back to the shop and will be formally unveiled in November, right before the Mint 400 races in December this year.

Designer: B Is For Build

Jumpacan - Lamborghini Huracan Custom Off-Roader

Jumpacan - Lamborghini Huracan Custom Off-Roader