This parametric 3D printed sneaker is made entirely out of one single flexible material

Like Crocs, but infinitely cooler…

The Parametriks Print 001 sneaker makes clever use of design and material sciences to create a sneaker that’s comfortable, stylish, and easy to manufacture. Sort of like how crocks just use one material that’s injection-molded into the shape of a shoe, the Print 001 relies on 3D printing to fabricate its design… which was arrived at by using parametric algorithms.

Parametric Design involves the use of computational parameters that help guide the design process. In a lot of ways, it’s a collaborative design effort between human and computer, as the human sets the parameters and the computer comes up with a form that most efficiently fulfills those parameters. In the case of this shoe, Nathan Smith (also known by his Instagram moniker Parametriks) used a custom algorithm on Grasshopper to create a form that enveloped a foot perfectly while utilizing less material yet offering the same amount of flexibility.

The shoe/sneaker uses a rather intriguing triangular mesh matrix that warps right around the wearer’s foot, fitting it perfectly thanks to the shoe’s bespoke design. Made from TPU, the shoe is about as flexible as a pair of Crocs, while looking infinitely cooler and offering a level of breathability and flexibility that’s unmatched. Sure, the holes on the shoe’s sole open you up to pebbles, thorns, and water, but then again, this piece of footwear is purely experimental as it hopes to explore what a parametric piece of footwear can look like. I’d say I’m pretty happy with the visual results!

Together, 3D printing and parametric design could essentially revolutionize the footwear industry. 3D printing is increasingly being used by companies like Adidas to design forms that can’t be made through traditional manufacturing methods. Parametric design, on the other hand, involves using the wearer’s foot shape and size as a parametric input, so the computer knows what to wrap its material around. This allows footwear to be incredibly personal and unique to the wearer, making them just as, if not more comfortable than regular mass-manufactured shoes.

You can check out more of Nathan’s work on his Instagram.

Designer: Nathan Smith

The post This parametric 3D printed sneaker is made entirely out of one single flexible material first appeared on Yanko Design.

This modular basketball shoe 3D printed in parts for comfort, cushion and traction has a green heart

Basketball shoes need a perfect blend of breathability, cushion, support and traction. Owing to the performance load, they tend to wear out quickly only to end up in landfills. As an ingenious alternative with the same prowess, an industrial designer with a love for basketball and shoes has conceived a 3D printed modular sneaker system that is built to match the standards of a Dunk High yet thrives on its concept of reparability.

The idea of sustainability is penetrating the footwear industry in a major way to say. While startups and indigenous manufacturers have made the first long stride, it’s the market leaders like Nike and adidas that are now catching up with their performance footwear donning a green conscience. Basketball shoes have not yet been touched by this wind of change; evidently, that’s really not how it will be in the years to come and already a unique concept proves that obvious.

This sustainable basketball sneaker is conceptualized by Dennis Johann Mueller. It has been through a lot of back and forthright from the drawing table to the prototype but the final outcome in images is by and large a concept that deserves to see the light of day with subtle commercial tweaks of course.

The silhouette for me is primarily a rage for its reparability quotient, much like the good conscience Fairphone. The shoe is designed in detachable parts; for instance, the upper, shankplate, midsole and outsole are all separately created to finally form a cohesive unit that can be worn to the hardwood court. This design basically offers users the freedom to adjust different shoe parts to their varying comfort and playing needs, and when they begin to wear out, only have the affected part recreated and replaced so the shoe can be worn as new.

In order to match the requirements of a great basketball shoe, this modular sneaker features a lightweight and perforated upper for good breathability. For comfort, the tongue and ankle areas have inflatable padding, which can be adjusted to need. The removable midsole, forefoot and heel regions come with detailed cushioning, while the translucent outsole wraps around the entire sneaker to act as its skin.

The full package is held together by a cord locking system that fastens the upper, midsole and outsole together without glue. This keeps each part of the shoe practical for recycling at the end of life. So, imagine a scenario where you can replace the shoe parts for the best fit and your style of play on the fly. When some section of the shoe wears out, you can have a new one tailored to perfection and assembled with the existing parts to use again while the waste goes into recycling. This is exactly what the future of the footwear industry we’d want to be realized, and Dennis’ effort is a commendable step in that direction!

Designer: Dennis Johann Mueller

 

Footwear designed using modern technology to give you the ultimate fashionably ergonomic design: Part 2

Shoes started off as functional designs meant to protect our feet, however with time they’ve now turned into style statements, a representation of our personality and our personal fashion sense. After all, don’t they say that you can tell a lot about a man by the state of his shoes? Personally, I love a good pair of sturdy and stylish sneakers, ones that can get me through the day without giving me any shoe bites, and also match my outfits! However, I do know that this isn’t the case with everybody. People have high demands and expectations when it comes to their footwear, hence designers are unleashing all of their creative juices, leaving no stones unturned in making unique, innovative, and ergonomic shoes! These footwear designs are as futuristic, inventive, and fashionable as they can get!

Former designer at Nike and Adidas, Hussain Almossawi, found himself asking a question. As a Tesla enthusiast, what if the company with its resources, creativity, and incredibly wealthy CEO, decided to go beyond sports-cars and design sports apparel instead? The conceptual Tesla Football Shoes combine Hussain’s love for football and for the Tesla brand into one positively radiant pair of performance sportswear. The shoes come in pristine white, with electroluminescent fabric woven into the sides and back, creating bright lines on the side, leading to a glowing, pulsating Tesla logo at the back. Moreover, the studs on the base of the shoes glow too, making them look exceptional in the dark but even more so when you’re dribbling away with the ball, creating one of the most beautiful light-streaks as you run!

Burfeind designed Sneature which is a sustainable sneaker alternative for the eco-conscious sneakerheads. The shoe is crafted from many waste materials. The yarn made of dog hair (Chiengora) which is a biological waste being upcycled – this is innovation. Sneature is biodegradable as well! The design does take into account the functional requirements of a trainer and individual customization by the user. The process uses a 3D knitting technology that allows for customization and on-demand production while using the lowest possible energy consumption method. The membrane is a protein-based 3D knit made from dog hair. It transports the functional properties of flexibility, stiffness, and air circulation with a very second-skin feel, similar to the sock sneaker style we’ve been seeing. These materials have natural properties that provide water absorption and release and anti-static properties.

Say hello to probably the most bizarre shoe collab in history. This pair of Nike Air-Jordans X Crocs collaborative clogs surely will make you feel a bunch of things, including, hopefully, a second reckoning. While the idea of footwear co-created by Nike, Jordan, and Crocs may sound absurd at first, these clogs honestly don’t look all that bad. I mean hey, I’d wear them… probably. The shoes come in the distinctive single-piece design that’s archetypal to the Crocs brand, with a silhouette that seems familiar too. Its details, however, borrow influences directly from the Air Jordan 1, with a perforated toebox and that iconic swoosh that wraps around the back of your foot, becoming the heel-strap.

Nike and footwear design technology go hand-in-hand, they’ve proven it in the past and now there’s yet another example of their prowess. These are the Go FlyEase hand-free shoes that bring the convenience of wearing and taking off your pair without even bending over or touching them ever. People who already do this with a pair of shoes with laces (when they are too tired or lazy) to take them off the conventional style (by untying the laces) will have their eyes set on the Nike Go FlyEase. The motion of using one foot to pull down on the heel of the other and vice versa when you have the crocs or loose sneakers is what most of us do. But doing the same to a pair of shoes can deform them over time – so Nike came up with a solution that lets you do kickstand heel motion to open them up in a jiffy without any damage to the shoe material. The invention’s core is a bi-stable hinge (the red element at the base of the shoe) and the midsole tensioner (that belt that wraps around) that gives the pair structural strength to be used as athletic footwear.

This is the Link by Padwa Design, Olga Kravchenko & Yehuda Azoulay, a shoe that has no shoelaces, straps, or even an upper cover. It’s literally a sole that ‘snaps to your feet’! Link presents a very unique approach to footwear. Just step into the soles and they automatically hug your feet, securing themselves in place. Without any upper cladding, the Link feels quite like walking barefoot. They allow your feet to remain ventilated, and providing all the freedom of movement and security you’d get from a pair of sneakers, but with the airy feel of flip-flops. Designed like a massive bumper-case for your feet, the Link is made with an EVA insole that provides comfort and grip, and a hard TPU outsole that comes with a fragmented design, allowing it to bend and flex with your feet. Together, the two materials make up Link’s construction, giving it flexibility, openness, friction/grip, and even a protective bumper around your feet, preventing your toes from accidental stubs and bumps.

carota_design_nike_sneakers_1

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Carota Design’s Nike self-lacing sneaker concepts literally look like they’re from the future. With hard-shell components and gloss/matte finish contrasts, they don’t look or feel like traditional shoes at all, aside from the familiar silhouette, which definitely is a good thing. Designed to highlight the futuristic aspect of shoes that secure themselves, the conceptual sneakers come with a red lace that stands well against the black sneakers. The laces travel from the outsole to the front, and then to the heel, where they connect to a motor that’s triggered by a button. Tap against the button and the motor tightens the laces up, securing the shoe in place. Tap a second time and the laces loosen, allowing you to slip your shoe out! A textbook ‘shut up and take my money’ product!

The Plant Shoe by Mike Belgue (Native Shoes) doesn’t use new materials, but rather introduces old materials into a new, one-of-a-kind product. Each part of the shoe is plant-based, using materials like jute, pineapple husk, kenaf, linen, treated with natural oils like olive oil for suppleness and comfort. Tricky bits of the shoe’s design involved finding a workaround for the sole, which Native managed to solve by partnering with France-based Reltex to create a sole that comprises a eucalyptus-pulp insole, kenaf (hemp) and corn cushioning, and a sap-based tread that gives the shoes its grip. Binding all the shoe’s parts together formed the next challenge, as most shoe companies rely on toxic, non-biodegradable petrochemical-based glues to hold the sneaker’s parts together. Native’s solution involved stitching all the parts together using entirely plant-based threads that are strong enough for sneaker construction.

Teaming up with the renowned Japanese Architect Kengo Kuma, ASICS has unveiled the latest edition of the Metaride, an all-white running shoe with a pattern inspired by Japanese Yatara bamboo-weaving, on the shoe’s body. The fabric strips wrap themselves in a seemingly chaotic way, but in fact, are strategically placed to hold the foot steady by binding with the shoe’s innovative Flytefoam base that uses cellulose nanofiber, a strong and lightweight wood-pulp derived material currently being researched and explored in Japan. The shoe is described as ‘moving architecture’ by Kuma, who relied on the age-old technique of Yatara to provide aesthetic dynamism as well as a comfortable fit.

The Walk Of Mind shoes are centered around a technology that allows users to get custom shoes made based on scans of their feet. Its slip-on design comes with a unique visual and tactile experience, appearing as well as feeling lightweight. The shoe’s light appearance can be attributed to the fact it looks quite like a feather or leaf wrapped around your foot, and the absence of the traditional thick sole found in shoes and sneakers makes it look/feel sleek and lightweight. The slip-on is a combination of multiple materials, including the leather wraparound and an SLS 3D printed nylon sole that fits into it. The sole, designed specifically for each foot, comes with a bespoke pebbled surface that applies pressure on specific areas of the foot to relieve pressure, provide support, and give you a comfortable walking experience without fatigue. What’s really unique about the Walk Of Mind footwear is the fact that its monosurface design and transitions seamlessly from sole to foot-cover.

This collection of netted shoes is called “Netina” and each one of them solves a certain purpose while being completely astray from each other when the looks are concerned. The aim of crafting these shoes is to develop a healthy social relationship among people, providing a sense of comfort in helping someone who’s a complete stranger. Goldberg said, “The human body contains various opportunities for carrying objects that can be useful for ourselves and to those around us. Our feet contain such benefits and also obtain the true characteristic of the movement.” In this collection are the white shoes that hold matchsticks in a spiked design for times when someone asks for a light. Then there are the red shoes that have a large opening to store tampons for your friend who’s having a menstrual cycle. The third pair of shoes in all blue color are for geeks who like to be surrounded by gadgets, as the pair sports USB ports for charging multiple gadgets via a power bank that is concealed in the sole of the shoes.

For more such fashionably ergonomic footwear designs, check out Part 1 of this post!

A sustainably designed shoebox that can protect, carry and display your footwear!

Looking for something that can protect your precious shoe collection but not create more waste? Meet Standbox – a shoebox, that can protect, carry, and present shoes! It has a small compact form which already gives it an edge over its counterparts and the storage also works as a display which makes it unique. The idea was to create a product that provides energy while saving space space not only to the user but also to its manufacturer and seller during production, distribution, and storage stages.

Standbox reduces the carbon footprint right at the manufacturing stage because it lets the manufacturer can distribute more products at once. Because of the material choice, the seller and user do not need those big plastic organizers to store and present the shoes. A big advantage of this design is that it can be carried on its own without the need for a plastic or paper bag unlike others of its kind in the market.

“It is a clever packaging design that aims to use energy resources more efficiently, take up less space than its counterparts, to minimize the need for extra plastic and cardboard,” says Bulut. The packaging itself doubles up as storage and display which creates minimal waste while saving space. Designed to be long-lasting, it can create a new life cycle after serving its purpose of packaging/shoebox. Standbox adds value to the existing packaging by simple tweaks that keep in mind the needs of the user, manufacturer, seller as well as the impact of the entire cycle, from production to waste, on the environment.

Desginer: Elif Bulut

This biodegradable shoe is crafted using waste materials and 3D knitting!

Sneaker culture has encouraged creativity but also added to a lot of waste since it is a part of fast fashion. Traditional sneakers have a short lifespan and with ‘drops’ increasing, people tend to buy and throw much faster. The complicated construction and the use of different materials (rubber, textile, various plastics, etc.) make these almost impossible and unprofitable to disassemble or recycle which is why Burfeind designed Sneature which is a sustainable sneaker alternative for the eco-conscious sneakerheads.

The shoe is crafted from many waste materials. The yarn made of dog hair (Chiengora) which is a biological waste being upcycled – this is innovation. Sneature is biodegradable as well! The design does take into account the functional requirements of a trainer and individual customization by the user. The process uses a 3D knitting technology that allows for customization and on-demand production while using the lowest possible energy consumption method.

The membrane is a protein-based 3D knit made from dog hair. It transports the functional properties of flexibility, stiffness, and air circulation with a very second-skin feel, similar to the sock sneaker style we’ve been seeing. These materials have natural properties that provide water absorption and release and anti-static properties. A thin layer of flexible bio-rubber/bioplastic forms the transition from the membrane to the sole. The junction of the membrane and sole is water-repellent against splashing or moisture from below awhile protecting the membrane in areas that quickly wear out. The transition also serves as a cushion and protects against rapid abrasion of all other areas in order to extend the lifespan of the shoe. The sole is made of mushroom mycelium which can be used as a composite material with local vegetable waste. The area is designed to be made of bioplastics which means this material can be produced at home or in a maker‘s lab like DIY materials.

“The sneaker was segmented into functional and structural areas (membrane, transition, sole) in order to implement the tested materials in a suitable way, taking into account the functional properties of the different areas. Because of the possible integration into an industrial production process, the membrane – the integrative core of the shoe – was created using a 3D-knitting technique. In order to approach the problem and conceptualize a solution, a fundamental factor for the ecological properties of every product – the material was examined. The design is based on a series of material experiments with natural raw fibers,” says Burfeind.

Designer: Emilie Burfeind

This Adidas X Mr. Bailey Sneaker Dives Deep For Its Oceanic Inspiration

Imagine a sneaker that was completely different from what you’ve seen in athletic footwear. Imagine creating an entirely new shape for this standardized product. What would it look like? Pulling inspiration from the marine mollusks, Mr. Bailey, a renowned foot/streetwear designer showcases a shoe unlike anything we’ve seen with his project, the Ammonite Superstar: Evolution of the Shell Toe.

At first glance, the Ammonite Superstar looks like a relic in a museum. When I first found this piece, I didn’t even recognize it as a sneaker. Several design cues help reinforce the parallels between the Ammonite shoe and its marine roots. The faded coloring gives the impression that the piece is a fossil, or at the very least, a piece of bone. Additionally, the shoe’s rubber sole – its most distinct feature – mimics the splayed segments of an octopus’s tentacles. Viewing the Ammonite Superstar from above, the warped sole looks like it was cut into stubby, fringe-like pieces. Flip the shoe over, and you’ll see that these rubber “fringes” connect, forming a circular chamber underneath the main body. It’s a unique visual and a memorable walking experience. (After all, what is a sneaker that can’t be worn?)

I, for one, would not have imagined that a deep-dive into footwear design would lead me to bookmark several ocean life documentaries to watch later. Even though I can’t integrate this unique piece into my wardrobe, I can appreciate it as a work of art. Visually, the Ammonite Superstar is a captivating, unconventional tribute to the mollusk species. It is a piece that appropriately honors its real-life inspiration and sparks curiosity in marine life.

Designer: Mr. Bailey and Adidas

 

These modern sneakers are made from 98% plant-based materials

Corn, rubber, eucalyptus, and cork. These are the unlikely materials that come together to make the Kengos Lace-Up – a chic, clean, modern-looking sneaker that’s designed to safely biodegrade after you’re done with it.

The Lace-Up makes a very ambitious claim of being 98% natural and plant-based, making it environment-friendly and vegan-friendly too. Its aesthetic is guided by the materials used in it, resulting in a sneaker that looks distinctly unique. On top, you’ve got an upper made from Amaize, a corn-based fabric that’s hardy-yet-breathable. The upper body is lined on the inside with eucalyptus fabric, allowing the sneakers to regulate temperature, absorb sweat, and cool you down in the heat. The Lace-Up’s midsole comes made out of cork, which molds to the shape of one’s foot almost like a foam insert… and the outsole comes crafted from Kengos’ patent-pending Pure-Flex rubber, which is durable as a work-boot, but biodegrades nearly 35-times as fast.

Kengos is currently beta-testing their shoes, allowing a small group of people to purchase them and wear them for a period of 30 days. After a month, Kengos takes your feedback using a questionnaire and a small interview with its founders, and sends you a second pair of shoes for free when the Lace-Up line officially launches in November. When you buy a pair of shoes, not only do you become a part of Kengos’ effort to truly build something driven by real customer feedback, you also support a company with a goal of making products that are sustainable, environmentally friendly, and least impact the earth.

Designer: Dave Costello (Kengos)

Footwear Designed using modern technology to give you the ultimate fashionably ergonomic design!

Did you know that the earliest known shoes are sagebrush bark sandals dating from approximately 7000 or 8000 BC, found in the Fort Rock Cave in the US state of Oregon in 1938? This humble and original everyday carry has been around for a while, with every generation leaving a distinct mark on the timeline of shoe design – be it the Chinese wooden shoes worn by women to keep their feet tiny to Kanye West’s Yeezy shoes. This versatile product has grown from a necessity to a fashion accessory, and this collection brings to mind the best of shoe designs for our modern, futuristic times. You check these out while I go research when the first high heel shoes were designed!

This is the Link by Padwa Design, Olga Kravchenko & Yehuda Azoulay, a shoe that has no shoelaces, straps, or even an upper cover. It’s literally a sole that ‘snaps to your feet’! Link presents a very unique approach to footwear. Just step into the soles and they automatically hug your feet, securing themselves in place. Without any upper cladding, the Link feels quite like walking barefoot. They allow your feet to remain ventilated, and providing all the freedom of movement and security you’d get from a pair of sneakers, but with the airy feel of flip-flops. Designed like a massive bumper-case for your feet, the Link is made with an EVA insole that provides the comfort and the grip, and a hard TPU outsole that comes with a fragmented design, allowing it to bend and flex with your feet. Together, the two materials make up Link’s construction, giving it flexibility, openness, friction/grip, and even a protective bumper around your feet, preventing your toes from accidental stubs and bumps.

Carota Design’s Nike self-lacing sneaker concepts literally look like they’re from the future. With hard-shell components and gloss/matte finish contrasts, they don’t look or feel like traditional shoes at all, aside from the familiar silhouette, which definitely is a good thing. Designed to highlight the futuristic aspect of shoes that secure themselves, the conceptual sneakers come with a red lace that stands well against the black sneakers. The laces travel from the outsole to the front, and then to the heel, where they connect to a motor that’s triggered by a button. Tap against the button and the motor tightens the laces up, securing the shoe in place. Tap a second time and the laces loosen, allowing you to slip your shoe out! A textbook ‘shut up and take my money’ product!

Using 3D printing, Ausin’s New Balance Study aims at redesigning fencing shoes keeping varying usage in mind. The result is two shoes that look a part of the same family, but you can immediately notice how the soles of both feet are completely different, molded by the areas of the feet that feel the most pressure during the lunge forward. Imagine this design philosophy for differently designed footwear carrying forward to other sports like bowling or golf!

The Plant Shoe by Mike Belgue (Native Shoes) doesn’t use new materials, but rather introduces old materials into a new, one-of-a-kind product. Each part of the shoe is plant-based, using materials like jute, pineapple husk, kenaf, linen, treated with natural oils like olive oil for suppleness and comfort. Tricky bits of the shoe’s design involved finding a workaround for the sole, which Native managed to solve by partnering with France-based Reltex to create a sole that comprises a eucalyptus-pulp insole, kenaf (hemp) and corn cushioning, and a sap-based tread that gives the shoes its grip. Binding all the shoe’s parts together formed the next challenge, as most shoe companies rely on toxic, non-biodegradable petrochemical-based glues to hold the sneaker’s parts together. Native’s solution involved stitching all the parts together using entirely plant-based threads that are strong enough for sneaker construction.

Teaming up with the renowned Japanese Architect Kengo Kuma, ASICS has unveiled the latest edition of the Metaride, an all-white running shoe with a pattern inspired by Japanese Yatara bamboo-weaving, on the shoe’s body. The fabric strips wrap themselves in a seemingly chaotic way, but in fact, are strategically placed to hold the foot steady by binding with the shoe’s innovative Flytefoam base that uses cellulose nanofiber, a strong and lightweight wood-pulp derived material currently being researched and explored in Japan. The shoe is described as ‘moving architecture’ by Kuma, who relied on the age-old technique of Yatara to provide aesthetic dynamism as well as a comfortable fit.

Designed for bespoke comfort, and for unparalleled lightness while running, Nike’s Joyride Run Flyknit literally has a sole that’s filled with multiple tiny squishy spongy beads. Resembling a beanbag for your feet, the Joyride give your feet the same feeling a beanbag gives your body. A cushioned experience that takes the shape of your foot. Engineered to perfection, these beads have absolutely the perfect density, allowing you to run on any surface without feeling the stress on your heels, shins, or knees. Made from thermoplastic polyurethane or TPE, the beads are size-calibrated and placed exactly at crucial areas of the sole so as to expand in all directions when you land your feet on the floor, cushioning impact and letting you literally feel like you’re running on a bed of memory foam… or if you’re looking for a more poetic comparison… running on air.

Shoe Kenton Lee

Kids grow fast, which means they outgrow their clothes and shoes rapidly too… forcing low-income-family children to either wear shoes even after they stop fitting, or walk around barefoot. On a mission to make one shoe that lasts through this growth process, Kenton launched The Shoe That Grows, an innovative piece of footwear that expands to fit children as they grow with age. Ill-fitted shoes are uncomfortable, but walking barefoot leaves children vulnerable to soil-transmitted diseases and parasites that can cause illness and even death, aside from the cuts, burns, and blisters. The Shoe That Grows combats the unfortunate scenario where children outgrow their footwear by being the one pair of footwear that grows with them. Extending at the front, sides, and the back, the sandals work simply like a belt would… expanding with size and necessity.

The 3D Surprise shoe by Dewayne Dale was created as a result of conceptualizing directly in 3D CAD software, rather than sketching first and building later. The conceptual shoe features a unibody design with a subtle gradient from top to bottom, visually creating a separation between shoe and outsole, while there’s no surface break between the two. Harnessing the shape of the foot, building on the bones and muscles within, the 3D Surprise was envisioned as a new-age hiking boot with a design that was simple and sophisticated looking. The shoe comes with an exaggerated protrusion detail for the ankle bone, and a textured sole that looks industrial and organic at the same time.

Made to bend around your heel and fit onto any shoe of any size, the Spurz by 4id come in a wide variety of colors and can be configured to either flash a steady light or blink continuously. With a run time of 70 hours when on steady light and 100 when blinking, the Spurz will need a battery replacement probably once every 3 months. They’re even designed to be absolutely weatherproof, so whether you’re out in the sun, rain, snow, you know you’re visible, and literally ‘marked’ safe!

Pierre Hardy’s Vibe Sneakers are a perfect embodiment of that stormtrooper aesthetic, with its jagged zebra-esque design that gives the shoes heavy dynamism and contrast, making them absolutely eye-catching and jaw-dropping. Built with a gum sole and a calf-leather upper, the Vibe sneakers from Pierre Hardy are luxury and style wrapped in a singular package. Creating an edgy contrast with the racy geometric stripes, the Vibe’s patterns actually draw inspiration from sound waves, which are translated onto the shoe’s body by pairing leather cuts all the way from the bottom to the very top.

 

Futuristic Footwear for the ‘space-age’ showcases an innovative outsole

Like Air Jordans… but for places with no atmosphere.

Designer Denis Agarkov’s thought process behind the ICARUS-4 Space Sneaker is simple. If we’re going to get humans into space, shouldn’t we also have an extraplanetary sense of design to match? The ICARUS-4 are conceptual sneakers for zero-gravity lifestyles… Designed for astronauts to provide maximum flexibility during repairs and maintenance, but cool-looking enough to be a universal fashion statement, the ICARUS-4 comes with a unique aesthetic that’s equal parts suited for a spacewalk and a ramp-walk. You’re looking at a shoe that sports an Ortho-Fabric body (the kind found on EMU suits) and a metal clasp to secure the footwear, with luminescent markers to allow you to wear the shoe in low-light conditions. The most interesting detail, however, is the shoe’s two-part sole design. The frontal half of the shoe sports a foam outsole, while the heel uses a rubber-ball outsole, both designed to help absorb shock while walking, running, jumping, and landing. Underneath the outsoles also lie powerful induction magnets that help the astronaut magnetically adhere to the hull of a ship while walking/working. Switch them on to stick to metallic hulls, and switch them off while performing backflips on the moon… or in a game of cosmic basketball – whichever situation seems more appropriate.

Designer: Denis Agarkov

How to buy sneakers for the hypebeast in your life

It's hard enough to find gifts for your loved ones during the holidays, but hypebeasts in particular are a picky bunch. They only want the most hyped products and the rarest sneakers, which can be a complicated world to navigate as a shopper if you'r...