Pineapple leaves become a convincing leather alternative using a sustainable process

We often take textiles for granted because they seem to be less harmful to the environment compared to plastics, but even that industry has some dark secrets. Chemicals used to create dyes that give life to clothes are harmful both to the planet as well as to the humans who handle them. Leather is a favorite among designers but is even more controversial because of its sources and the processes involved in tanning the material. There have been numerous attempts to create leather alternatives, some of them involving problematic components and resources as well. One new option, however, tries to use leaves that would have been thrown away or, worse, burned anyway and turns them into a leather-like textile that you would easily mistake for the real thing.

Designer: Carmen Hijosa (Ananas Anam)

Common synthetic leather alternatives don’t really solve the overall problem with leather. While they do mean that fewer animals are killed in the process, the chemicals and processes involved in making them are just as harmful to the planet as traditional leather tanning. That is why many designers and some companies have turned their eyes toward Nature’s natural fibers for inspiration, but using plant-based materials isn’t as easy as it sounds. That’s what makes Piñatex quite the innovation, providing a leather alternative that’s close to the original in quality while also supporting a truly circular economy.

Pineapple leaves are the natural byproducts of harvesting these tropical fruits, but there is very little use for them. This waste is simply gathered and left to decompose, though most farms actually just burn them. Unsurprisingly, that action results in the release of large volumes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, worsening the greenhouse effect on the planet. Piñatex uses the ignored potential of pineapple leaves to produce something that you probably would have never thought came from discarded leaves.

Piñatex pretty much serves the same purpose as conventional leather but can even be more versatile than the original. It’s easier to produce more colors, for one, using GOTS-certified pigments. A water-based PU resin coating is applied on top to add durability and water resistance, making it a good fit for almost anything that would normally use leather. And unlike most plant-based textiles, Piñatex is non-woven in order to provide that same texture as leather.

What makes the material even better is how it pushes for a “cradle to cradle” ecosystem, where the materials are not only biodegradable but also helps pineapple farmer tap an additional source of income. The process of turning pineapple leaves into leather-like textiles also uses fewer natural resources and no chemicals. And whatever is left of the leaves can be used as fertilizer for the next generation of pineapples or biofuel for the machines that harvest them or make Piñatex.

It is definitely encouraging to see more sustainable alternatives growing in the textile and fashion industry, considering how clothes and accessories are mass-produced by the millions. Plastics may be the biggest problem the planet faces today, but almost every facet of our modern life deserves re-examination and redesign. And organic or plant-based alternatives don’t have to mean lower quality materials, as the list of heavyweight Piñatex customers can testify.

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Zeefier is creating sustainable textile dyes from recycled seaweed waste

Everyone wears clothes and, regardless of your particular style or aesthetic inclinations, those clothes will often have one or more colors. While most of the materials used in textile could be considered sustainable or at least biodegradable, part of their production actually has a tremendous negative impact on the environment. It’s almost too easy to take for granted that the things responsible for our colorful attires harm both the planet and the humans working with these dyes. The need for safer and more sustainable ways to dye textiles has never been greater, and, as always, we only have to look to Mother Nature for the answers to many of the problems we have made for ourselves.

Designer: Nienke Hoogvliet

Despite its almost pejorative name, people have started to recognize the benefits of seaweed, at least beyond just an ingredient for food. True to its name, it is almost too easy to grow seaweed without the need for freshwater or agricultural land. And like any other plant, it purifies CO2 and produces life-sustaining oxygen. Seaweed has also become a favorite component in cosmetics these days, which has increased their use and, unfortunately, their waste.

The startup Zeefier is trying to fight two battles on different fronts. On the one hand, it is trying to promote the use of seaweed to solve many of the sustainability problems of the fashion industry, particularly in the use of synthetic dyes. On the other hand, it is also trying to avoid pushing “seagricultural” practices that could also harm the environment in other ways. So instead, the seaweed they are using for their 100% natural dyes is collected from food and cosmetic wastes, enabling a more circular economy that reduces the risk of growing or harvesting seaweed too much.

Given the nature of seaweed, some might doubt how varied the dyes produced from these plants can be. In truth, the potential colors do seem to sit on a specific range, but it isn’t at all limited as one might presume. There are, of course, browns and greens, but there are also oranges, purples, and even pinks. Despite the existence of red seaweed, red dye has proven to be a bit problematic so far. Blue, at least for now, seems to be out of the question, too.

There are apparently other bumps in the road in creating natural dyes from seaweed or any other organic material in general. There’s the potential discoloration over time, even if subtle. These natural substances also don’t seem to work well with anything but natural materials like cotton, silk, and wool. Perhaps it is a good thing in order to sway people away from synthetic textiles as well.

Fortunately, Zeefier is intent on developing the secret sauce to make seaweed-based dyes and textiles successful and commercially viable. This kind of sustainable thinking pushes bright minds to utilize the wealth of materials that the Earth provides us, especially the ones that are easily replenished. At the same time, Zeefier’s advocacy is also a testament to how an overabundance of anything can be harmful and that we don’t really need to grow or harvest more seaweed than what we’re already throwing away.

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A-COLD-WALL x Converse Sponge CX Crater pushes the limits of wearability and style

Just like its parent company Nike, Converse has been teaming up with different brands, celebrities, and artists to introduce new sneaker creations that will please the sneakerheads. In recent months, the label has inked a deal with Samuel Ross’ brand A-COLD-WALL, and the partnership is a significant one because the British designer is currently famous in the menswear fashion scene. The collaboration has already delivered the recently-released Converse Aeon Active CX with a future-ready silhouette. And this time around, the duo is set to show off the Converse Sponge Crater CX as a new model. At first glance, you will recognize that it’s a follow-up to the Aeon Active CX because of the similarities in shape and texture. It boasts the same sculptural form and bold silhouette that you can’t imagine would be comfortable, but it actually is.

Designer: A-Cold-Wall x Converse

Converse x A-COLD-WALL Sponge Crater

Converse x A-COLD-WALL Sponge Crater

Few will agree this pair is minimalist, but that is how the designers describe its form compared to the previous model. The Sponge Crater’s design is more straightforward with the minimized components but still looks attractive with the choice of colors. You will see the orange flat-knit upper with a printed A-COLD-WALL logo, small details like the gray pull tabs and the spandex collar, and the shell made of Crater and CX foam. What is most notable about the shoe is the unique texture—like the moon’s surface with all the craters and holes.

Converse x A-COLD-WALL Sponge Crater

A-Cold-Wall and Converse intended for the shoes to have such an interesting crater foam body and an overstated heel kick that allows ease of entry. It appears complicated, but it is comfortable, stable, and able to provide all-day support. Converse’s very own CX technology combined with a PU foam CX liner allows comfort and warmth with every stride. The brands that worked on the pair also intended for the Converse x A-COLD-WALL Sponge Crater to be used across all types of terrains, so you know the pair isn’t just for showing off.

Converse x A-COLD-WALL Sponge Crater

The A-Cold-Wall x Converse Sponge Crater proves the “less is more” principle which both brands follow. The pair offers style and wearability that are not often balanced if we’re talking about hyped sneakers. Samuel Ross’ flair for craftsmanship and atypical contemporary aesthetic is evident in the pair. But what is likable about this is the next-level comfort and support, thanks to the Crater foam body, CX foam underfoot, and the egg-crate style traction pod outsole.

Converse x A-COLD-WALL Sponge Crater

Converse x A-COLD-WALL Sponge Crater

The avante-garde design of the A-Cold-Wall x Converse Sponge Crater is yet another fruit of the collaborative efforts between the two labels, delivering a futuristic feel that pushes the boundaries of style and footwear technology. Converse is known for shoes with all-day comfort, and the Sponge Crater offers just that—comfort and support to the feet throughout the day.

Converse x A-COLD-WALL Sponge Crater

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Converse x A-COLD-WALL Sponge Crater

 

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Balenciaga looks even worse on Mark Zuckerberg’s avatar

The metaverse may not really exist yet, but Mark Zuckerberg already has a plan to sell users on designer fashion for their metaverse avatars. Meta announced that it’s opening an Avatars Store where users can purchase outfits for their avatars on Facebook, Instagram and Messenger.

The new looks include designer duds from Balenciaga, Prada and Thom Browne and the company expects to add more designers over time. Zuckerberg and Eva Chen, Meta’s VP of Fashion Partnerships, announced the new store on an Instagram Live they described as the “first live avatar fashion show.” The “fashion show” portion consisted of Chen holding up paper drawings of Zuckerberg’s avatar wearing increasingly questionable, if metaverse-ready, outfits.

“I think the only question is am I cool enough to wear that,” Zuckerberg asked at one point after seeing a Balenciaga-clad Zuck-atar. “I’m not sure if I’m quite up to that.” Chen also showed a Zuckerberg a Thom Browne look she described as a "classic English schoolboy kind of vibe" that only vaguely resembled Danny from The Shining

Zuckerberg's avatar.
Screenshot / Instagram

As to just why Facebook users would pay actual money for metaverse clothes, Chen pointed out that it will be much easier to get your hands on, say, an oversized Balenciaga hoodie in the metaverse than IRL. It will also be cheaper, with prices in the Avatars Store will ranging from $2.99 to $8.99 "to start," according to a company spokesperson. 

Of course, selling digital items in the metaverse is also an important part of Meta’s strategy to keep making billions of dollars even as it pivots away from advertising. The company previously confirmed it plans to keep 48 percent of the profit from creators’ selling digital assets in Horizon Worlds’ VR experience. A Meta spokesperson declined to share what Meta’s cut would be on its new avatar fashion.

Balenciaga looks even worse on Mark Zuckerberg’s avatar

The metaverse may not really exist yet, but Mark Zuckerberg already has a plan to sell users on designer fashion for their metaverse avatars. Meta announced that it’s opening an Avatars Store where users can purchase outfits for their avatars on Facebook, Instagram and Messenger.

The new looks include designer duds from Balenciaga, Prada and Thom Browne and the company expects to add more designers over time. Zuckerberg and Eva Chen, Meta’s VP of Fashion Partnerships, announced the new store on an Instagram Live they described as the “first live avatar fashion show.” The “fashion show” portion consisted of Chen holding up paper drawings of Zuckerberg’s avatar wearing increasingly questionable, if metaverse-ready, outfits.

“I think the only question is am I cool enough to wear that,” Zuckerberg asked at one point after seeing a Balenciaga-clad Zuck-atar. “I’m not sure if I’m quite up to that.” Chen also showed a Zuckerberg a Thom Browne look she described as a "classic English schoolboy kind of vibe" that only vaguely resembled Danny from The Shining

Zuckerberg's avatar.
Screenshot / Instagram

As to just why Facebook users would pay actual money for metaverse clothes, Chen pointed out that it will be much easier to get your hands on, say, an oversized Balenciaga hoodie in the metaverse than IRL. It will also be cheaper, with prices in the Avatars Store will ranging from $2.99 to $8.99 "to start," according to a company spokesperson. 

Of course, selling digital items in the metaverse is also an important part of Meta’s strategy to keep making billions of dollars even as it pivots away from advertising. The company previously confirmed it plans to keep 48 percent of the profit from creators’ selling digital assets in Horizon Worlds’ VR experience. A Meta spokesperson declined to share what Meta’s cut would be on its new avatar fashion.

New microbial weaving process can grow compostable fabric from microbes

Sustainable fashion has just begun, and we believe the concept will continue spreading as more companies consider such a flourishing ecosystem of materials, processes, and products. It is part of a circular economy where waste materials are being shared, reused, repaired, recycled, or refurbished to create new products. It is one of the many ways to attain a better planet for the next generation and we are glad that many scientists and researchers are putting so much effort into this level of development. For sustainability to happen, it doesn’t always mean you take advantage of all the usable waste for recycling–it can also mean creating new materials, designs, and more sustainable ways for the fashion industry. What has just been introduced and what could be beneficial to the game is a new biomaterial by Modern Synthesis.

Designer: Modern Synthesis

Modern Synthesis Fabric From Microbes

Modern Synthesis is a startup that works on biomaterial innovation for the fashion industry, aiming to identify radical and regenerative material solutions that could significantly reduce plastic pollution and emissions. Specifically, the company has already started to grow fabric that can be used for fashion from microbes. There is science behind this idea, which is why Modern Synthesis convinced people to fund its research, and it has proudly shared that it received more than $4 million in seed funding from AgFunder to develop a microbial textile platform.

Modern Synthesis founders Jen Keane and Ben Reeve have recognized the need for more sustainable materials and solutions. The funding from AgFunder is expected to help the team’s expansion, build a pilot facility in London, and finally ramp up production. The potential of this project is huge, so there is a bit of urgency when it comes to putting people and systems to work.

Modern Synthesis has introduced a new technology that could make biotextiles from microbes by “weaving” and “growing” a kind of bacteria known as k.rhaeticus— the type found in kombucha tea so the idea is natural. The company developed a microbial weaving process (still patent-pending) to create fabric and composites by simply growing microbes. There is no actual weaving that happens, as in the traditional sense of weaving, but what happens is that bacteria grow and trail tiny fibers of nanocellulose to create non-woven fiber.

Bacteria grow the fabric material over time and take the shape of a scaffold if there is a need to create shape or form. The scaffold acts as the structure where the microbes can grow into a biomaterial that is strong yet lightweight in form. Simply put, bacteria grown inside a container form whatever shape of structure—like magically growing fabric out of nothing. But, of course, there is no magic—just science and technology being put to good use for a better planet.

This microbial weaving can be likened to 3D printing because it can also be used for shoes, as explored by founder Jen Keane back in 2018. The shoe business is just one possible application, but we can imagine this process to be used in other industries. In the near future, we hope to learn about a top sportswear brand using this process as Modern Synthesis recently shared its prototyping process and materials with a certain unknown company.

Modern Synthesis’ goal is to further contribute significantly to a circular economy and as Keane explained in a report: “At the end of the day, we’re trying to build a circular manufacturing system with these microbes. That enables us to leverage agricultural waste, use the microbes as manufacturing units, and transfer them into more viable materials. On the flip side, we see the opportunity to have new-class materials that are fully cellulosic so we can recycle them back into silos and recycling stream.”

Replacing those animal and petrochemical-derived materials is also the startup’s goal, so we believe the efforts of everyone involved will not be in vain. Many people are hopeful this microbial textile technology will remarkably help the fashion industry lower its carbon print. Using bacteria to transform into nanocellulose from sugar obtained from agricultural waste is one innovative development we hope can also be applied in many industries.

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Naglev Vulcano uses bulletproof Kevlar to save your feet from rocks and crags

Not many people know this but what makes a bulletproof vest bulletproof is a material called Kevlar. We’re not hoping we would need such a vest anytime soon, but it’s also a good idea to be prepared and knowledgeable. If only we could use the Kevlar material in most of our clothing and footwear, but it’s not that easy to implement. What we’re probably getting soon are super rugged shoes with Kevlar uppers that are able to protect and shield your feet from whatever danger or element whenever you are outdoors. With this pair of kevlar shoes, we can say you can survive any jungle or mountain cliff and all dangers you can encounter, as the shoes are basically indestructible, thanks to the material’s strong molecular structure.

Designer: Achille Morlin, Elettra Morlin

Naglev Vulcano Shoes 10

Naglev Vulcano Shoes 12

The special pair is officially called the Naglev Vulcano—-bulletproof shoes for the feet of highly adventurous people. The shoes are 100% water-resistant, so you use them for any kind of outdoor adventure that may get you dredging soil or exploring the trails of an unknown valley. The pair can keep your feet cool and dry, thanks to a Lycra interior liner that is quick-drying and moisture-wicking. The outsole is natural and is durable enough that it won’t deteriorate quickly.

Naglev Vulcano Shoes

The Naglev Vulcano can be considered part of sustainable fashion because the shoes are built with environment-friendly manufacturing practices. This means carbon footprint is significantly reduced but still with uncompromised quality. Naglev’s aim has always been to innovate the footwear production system, researching ways and solutions that would minimize shoe production steps. As a result, it’s able to develop a new process that can result in extremely low environmental impact.

Naglev Vulcano Shoes

Naglev Vulcano Shoes

The company uses the patented Fuso technology that starts by blending all structural elements of the shoe. The sole, midsole, and the upper are better and more durable and offer a better fit because they have been fused together. Increased performance is also a promise of this new technology and design of the Vulcano—a mix of the Kevlar fabric, a natural rubber sole, and an upper that wraps the structural element, lining, and sole lugs. Each shoe has a protective Kevlar shell upper, eco-made lycra lining, and an Ortholite footbed, while the outsole is Michelin natural rubber and a mid-sole that is dual-density EVA. The shoes promise comfort even if the pair is rugged and looks perfect for hiking–it’s almost ready for war! It can probably pass the military standards since the upper is characterized as tearproof, with salt resistance, cut resistance, and abrasion resistance.

Naglev Vulcano Shoes

Naglev Vulcano Shoes

Naglev Vulcano Shoes

Naglev Vulcano Shoes

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Neo-Primitive Chair proves nature and artifacts can coexist in harmony

RIMOWA Lee Sisan Neo-primitive

Through the decades, Rimowa has released very distinctive luggage and bag designs, most of which are much-coveted among social media and travel influencers. The famous luggage maker has been seen collaborating with luxury brands, artists, and designers to release interesting pieces and it’s not stopping anytime soon. We have spotted a few memorable ones and even those inspired designs that can be a perfect alternative because Rimowa isn’t exactly cheap. While the most successful collaborations are all with sports or fashion brands like Supreme, Off-White, Anti Social Social Club, and BAPE, there are also a few quieter collabs like this one with Sisan Lee, a South Korean designer and artist who is bent on exploring the relationship between humans, nature, and artifact. Lee believes objects can co-exist with nature in harmony, so he works with different materials to deliver unique items with functions that people can use and enjoy.

Designer: Sisan Lee

RIMOWA Lee Sisan Neo-primitive Aluminum Chair Exhibit

Sisan Lee has teamed up with premium-quality luggage brand Rimowa for a collaboration that was meant to be showcased at the “As Seen by” exhibit in South Korea. The designer utilized Rimowa’s very own grooved aluminum sheets, the same ones used on the brand’s prized carrier luggage pieces. He also thought of using tree branches and then transforming them into aluminum using sand casting–resulting in a luxuriously-styled chair that will probably make you remember you’re not yet traveling as you used to.

RIMOWA Lee Sisan Neo-primitive Aluminum Chair Components

These aluminum branches act as legs and support for the thin aluminum backrest, whose design is the pattern for the luggage cover. It’s actually the cutout of the main form of the luggage before assembly, while another sheet of aluminum is also used for the seat and then combined with other sheets by bolts. The aluminum chair stands tall with a silver finish, looking like another expensive furniture item to behold and cherish.

RIMOWA Lee Sisan Neo-primitive Aluminum Chair Design

Artifact (aluminum) and nature (branches) are blended to prove that harmony can create a stunning piece of functional art. The effect is a mysterious atmosphere of two different materials and components, forming an alluring object you can’t ignore. The choice of aluminum makes the chair sturdy and durable even if it looks sleek and fragile with very thin materials. It may look brittle, but like the famous Rimowa luggage series, the Neo-Primitive Chair is made with strength and solidity. This thing measures W410 x D 520 x H 1800cm and is ready to look pretty and perfect in your industrial-style home.

This Neo-Primitive Chair is considered an organic piece of furniture as it brings together nature and manufactured articles. The cast aluminum branches offer strength, support, and stability for anyone who dares to sit on the aluminum throne. The name Neo-Primitive is a perfect description for this piece that gives old materials a new lease in life.

RIMOWA Lee Sisan Neo-primitive Aluminum Chair Materials

RIMOWA Lee Sisan Neo-primitive Aluminum Chair Components

RIMOWA Lee Sisan Neo-primitive Aluminum Chair Design

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This futuristic hoodie is weather adaptive, abrasion-proof, and comes with a set of modular accessories

Why carry a backpack on your shoulders when you could just snap a bag to your hoodie? The Ultra Hoodie quite literally does that, with a magnetic M-System plug that lets you quickly attach messenger bags, pouches, and other accessories directly to the hoodie, sort of like giving yourself extra pockets. If that wasn’t cool enough, the Ultra Hoodie is also water resistant with DWR and abrasion-proof, comes with dedicated pockets for your belongings, built-in AirPods holders, and a tiny window that lets you look at your smartwatch without having to lift your sleeves up. It’s also simultaneously breathable and stretchable, allowing you to be as comfortable and free as you would in a regular hoodie, and it comes in the most badass color on the planet – jet black.

Designer: William Chen

Click Here to Buy Now: $198 $280 (30% off). Hurry, less than 24 hours left!

The patent-pending Ultra Hoodie quite literally propels the most comfortable piece of clothing into the future. While most hoodies were designed for casual comfort, the Ultra Hoodie combines comfort with performance, versatility, and durability. At first glance, it might look just like a regular (albeit classy) hoodie, but look closer and you’ll realize how much there is to unpack.

The hoodie comes made from a high-gauge weaving structure with a dedicated internal membrane that makes it incredibly resilient to wind and rain, while still being up to 5 times more breathable than your average jacket. An inner fleece lining keeps you warm without making you sweaty, and creates a comfortable environment that only a hoodie can.

The Ultra Hoodie, however, isn’t just designed for comfort. Its fabric has 360° stretchability, making the Ultra Hoodie perfect for the great outdoors. It’s also abrasion-resistant, so you can wear it just about anywhere without worrying about it getting damaged, and has reflective strips on the back, increasing visibility and safety.

Hidden Card Slot

Phone Pocket

Watch Window

The Ultra Hoodie also comes with a few functional upgrades designed to help you effectively adapt to different situations. It has an abundance of pockets, including hidden slots on the sleeve to store your phone, cash, or cards. A water bottle pocket beside the ribs lets you easily carry a bottle or umbrella, and a towel loop on the back is perfect for storing a rolled-up napkin or sweat towel while working out.

The hoodie also has an adjustable hood with pull-strings that also double up as holders for AirPods. Want to wear your AirPods with your head covered? The hoodie comes with passthrough vents that let you fit in your earbuds THROUGH the hood.

Perhaps the most impressive feature the Ultra Hoodie sports is its versatile M-System modular design. The M-System is a magnetic modular interface that allows you to snap a host of extra modules and accessories to the hoodie. These accessories include the M-System Pack, a messenger-style waterproof bag that basically attaches to your torso, eliminating the need for straps.

The M-System Pack works almost like an extension of your hoodie, giving you an extra set of waterproof zippers to carry extra belongings, and just in case you want to use it without the hoodie, there is a detachable strap too that allows you to wear the pack as a side-sling or cross-body bag. Other accessories include a name-tag, which slips right into the base of the jacket right near your hip, where you’d attach your retractable lanyard anyway, and a polygonal hat, which just acts as a rather cool accessory when you’re trying to nail the Heisenberg look.

What the Ultra Hoodie really does is expand the capabilities of an otherwise rather commonplace piece of clothing that people usually wear for days at an end because it’s just comfortable. In its renewed avatar, the hoodie 2.0 if you will, the Ultra Hoodie becomes the kind of apparel you can wear everyday and everywhere, thanks to a series of rather functional upgrades. The stretchable, breathable, high-performance fabric is perfect for practically any demanding outdoor scenario, and the pockets, features, and accessories that accompany the Ultra Hoodie make it perfect for the everyday urban warrior!

Click Here to Buy Now: $198 $280 (30% off). Hurry, less than 24 hours left!

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Reebok’s adaptive footwear collection truly wants to make life easier for disabled

Everyone deserves a pair of sneakers that amplifies the craving for everyday success. That said, the power of comfortable and accessible footwear should not be exclusive. Thankfully Reebok really wants to help the physically challenged community with a gimmick-free collection of lifestyle and performance-oriented sneakers.

Brands like Nike have lately offered adaptive sneakers for people with disability but were they affordable? Surely, not. The Go FlyEase hand-free sneakers are a good example of this fact. They were at one point in time very inaccessible, and some resellers listed them online for an exorbitant price tag of $2,000. In the end, their purpose of helping the disabled community got juxtaposed. Rebook wants to fix this with the Fit to Fit accessible footwear collection which is practical and priced sensibly for everyone to explore without burning a hole in the pocket.

Designer: Reebok and Zappos Adaptive

The new edition of sneakers is designed in partnership with Zappos Adaptive, and includes two sneakers crafted for easy on-and-off wear to facilitate disabled people. Dubbed the Nanoflex Parafit TR and Club MEMT Parafit, these sneakers are low-cut and feature removable sock liners (for orthotics) and high abrasion rubber outsoles for superior grip. While the Nanoflex Parafit TR has a breathable mesh upper, medial zipper and heel pull tab for easy putting on or taking off – the Club MEMT Parafit has a leather upper and extra 4E width.

Thankfully both the sneakers come in unisex sizing, and can be purchased as a pair, or as a single shoe too. Reebok has priced them both sensibly as the Nanoflex Parafit TR retails for $90, while the Club MEMT Parafit comes for $65. We genuinely hope the sneakers will not go out of stock, and end up selling for more prices at later stages. If that’s not the case, Reebok and Zappos are surely going to be popular brands among disabled people and physically challenged athletes. After all these functional pairs of footwear permit a life of independence and free movement. All this while maintaining Reebok’s iconic design and timeless silhouettes.

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