Icy Dock ToughArmor MB872MP-B Can Fit 12 SATA SSDs in a 5.25″ Drive Bay: Super Saiyan Drive Super Saiyan

The M.2 storage drive specification has been one of the best new additions to PCs in recent years, allowing for extremely compact and easy-to-install SSDs. These days it’s often used by incredibly fast NVMe SSDs, giving you the best of both worlds – small footprint and lightning speeds – at reasonable prices. But if you’re all-in on storage, Icy Dock has an enclosure that can hold up to 12 SATA M.2 SSDs in the now archaic 5.25″ drive bay.

The ToughArmor MB872MP-B enclosure has an all-metal construction and a 3-speed 4omm fan for durability. Its drive lockers feature a tool-less mechanism, allowing you to install drives in as little as 10s. It’s compatible with M.2 SATA SSDs from 2230 all the way up to 22110.

The enclosure connects to your motherboard via three SFF-8612 data connectors and two SATA 15-pin power connectors. That may sound like a lot, but considering you can pack up to 12 drives, that’s still very efficient and saves you a lot of time and cable management.

This being a high-end product, it does come with a fitting price tag. You can order the ToughArmor MB872MP-B from Buywee for about $970 (USD). It’s also on Amazon (affiliate link).

[via Toms Hardware]

Meet the world’s first gaming bike with powerful PC hardware, courtesy of Gigabyte (Aorus), Red Bull, and Intel!





Don’t debunk this mini rocker BMX bike for an unpractical concept since it is a real-life creation designed by Russia-based shop Mactepckar Yolenzo. The project commissioned by Gigabyte (Aorus), Red Bull, and Intel is nothing like we’ve seen in the past. It is called the Exo Giga Bike, and it is loaded with high-end PC hardware – a GeForce RTX 3070 graphics card, Gigabyte z590i Aorus ultra motherboard, and the Intel i5-11600K processor. That combination makes this PC gaming bike the ideal ride for geeks who like to perform insane BMX tricks in the afternoon and then hit the couch for some shooting action on their PC by the nighttime. The Exo Giga Bike does them both in style!

The mini BMX game bike can ride the city and do the odd trick without all that PC hardware coming in the way. We can turn the steering 90 degrees without much fuzz, and the pedaling action doesn’t get obstructed. It even has a water cooling system to keep the temperature of the PC hardware under tab if you go out on a LAN gaming spree at your buddy’s place. Yes, it is no gimmick as it has an AORUS RGB 32 GB 3733 MHz RAM and the 2TB AORUS Gen4 NVME SSD. Fully capable of connecting to a display and initiate high-end gaming at high graphics settings.

This mini BMX gaming bike is a whole new way to carry your gaming rig with you. You don’t want to risk such pricey PC hardware getting damaged while performing tricks (even though my current PC would crash more than this, literally) or when the clouds come raining down. If you are planning to gaming with this setup, we recommend a really long power cord to keep you going, no matter where

Designer:  Mactepckar Yolenzo

The EXO Giga Bike is a Custom PC in a Bicycle: BMX On

If you’re a PC enthusiast, you might have noticed that boutique manufacturers are actually making open-air chassis that are not meant to be test benches, but for showcase builds. Well, how’s this for an open-air chassis? Russian-based shop Yolenzo worked with Red Bull, Intel, and Gigabyte to create the Exo Giga Bike, a rocker bicycle that’s equipped with serious gaming horsepower.

It’s a bit sad that most of us can’t even get our hands on any current-gen GPU, yet these guys slapped one on a bike. But the project’s cool factor does soothe the sting. The Exo has an Intel Core i5 11600K CPU, an RTX 3070, 32GB of RAM, 2TB NVME SSD, and a Z590 motherboard.

Here’s the Exo in action… as a bike:

Open-air, small form factor, portable. What more could you want?

[via Aorus]

World’s first DIY breathing PC uses magnetic bellows to stay cool. Watch the video!





How innovative can your average PC case get for design? DIY expert Matt Perks of DIY Perks sets a new high with his breathing PC that keeps the high-performance GPU and CPU cool with a breathable motion never ever seen before. Sure fanless PC builds have bemused me in the past, but a PC chassis that has its own sets of lungs (metaphorically) is the reason you see this writeup here. Matt wanted to try out PC cooling without the noisy fans for a high-end gaming machine loaded with an Nvidia RTX 3080 graphics card and 16-core AMD Ryzen 5950X CPU. That powerhouse combination demands active cooling as they produce a lot of heat.

This towering PC rig is not compact by any means as the breathable part is housed in the lower section, and the PC components are placed above it. The back and forth breathing magic is achieved with magnets and reinforced acrylic panels. Using acrylic bellows, vents, and a water loop – the innovation can cool one of the best graphics cards and the best gaming CPU on the market, the RTX 3080 and AMD Ryzen 9 5950X. This system results in cool air being pushed up to the powerful components and through the radiator, which keeps the system cool. All the hot air is pushed out from the top to prevent it from circulating back inside.

During the testing phase, the CPU and GPU temperature is maintained at 60°C and 62°C, respectively, using this unique cooling system. These are usable temperatures for gaming at medium settings but don’t expect to push the limits with your ultra-settings and ray tracking switched on. For a first-time effort at building this DIY PC, I’m not complaining about its capability compared to the traditional cooling solutions for high-end PCs. It’s not every day that you come across such a futuristic PC, and given its innovative engineering, the entire video is worth watching!

Designer: Matt Perks

This nifty gadget turns any laptop or desktop monitor into a massive iPad Pro and Stylus




Plug the Hello X3 in the top left corner of any display (or any flat surface) and suddenly you have a stylus-capable screen that you can draw on, annotate against, and present with.

Up until just 5 minutes ago, I was ready to throw a little over a grand at a new, 12.9-inch M1 iPad Pro and the Apple Pencil. I’m honestly reconsidering now after stumbling across this $120 gadget that transforms any flat surface into a stylus-friendly touchscreen. Titled the YELANG Hello X3, this 3-axis-shaped device plugs onto the corner of any flat rectangular surface (although it’s much more useful when mounted on a display), practically turning it into an iPad. The Hello X3 works with displays as large as 27-inches, and comes along with a pressure-sensitive stylus too to rival the Apple Pencil.

Click Here to Buy Now: $120 $189 (37% off) Hurry! Just 14 hours left!

Currently in its third generation (hence the X3 suffix), the Hello X3 expands on what its previous generations could do. It comes with a camera-sensor that can now read surface areas that are anywhere between 10-27 inches, has 2mm precision (which is alright, to be honest), a 120 fps response time, and here’s the best part, compatibility with both Macintosh and Windows-based systems. Just plug it onto your iMac or your Windows desktop monitor and you’ve got yourself a massive tablet PC that you can sketch on, make models in, edit documents, sign papers, or even use in a bunch of other productivity apps and softwares. If you’re traveling, the Hello X3 plugs right off and is portable enough to be carried right in your bag along with the stylus.

The Hello X3’s universal design is perhaps its biggest selling point, but it’s also matched by the fact that setting it up on a new device is ridiculously simple. Just pop the gadget on the top-left of the screen (it works with left-handed as well as right-handed users), plug it in via USB, and you’re ready to calibrate it. To calibrate the Hello X3 to your screen, just tap the 4 corners of the display with the stylus and you’re done. The stylus is thick and grippy like a marker or a fountain-pen, and sports a pressure-sensitive tip that can make thicker strokes if you press harder and thinner strokes if you lightly touch a surface. In just minutes, your 4K monitor turns into a graphics tablet.

The Hello X3 works with regular surfaces too. If you’re not really comfortable with drawing on vertical surfaces (which, let’s face it, can get uncomfortable), just plug the Hello X3 onto a drawing pad or a clipboard and you’ve got yourself a makeshift tablet PC (remember the Wacom Intuos?). This setup works rather well when you’re using a projector too, instead of a laptop or a desktop monitor. Each Hello X3 comes along with its own drawing-board for good measure, and a stand for your stylus when it’s not in use. The stylus has a standby time of 120 days, and a use-time of 4 hours, although it charges completely in just under 30 minutes. The YELANG Hello X3 is currently in its final hours of funding and is set to ship as early as September. Grab it at its special early-bird price of $120 on Kickstarter!

Click Here to Buy Now: $120 $189 (37% off) Hurry! Just 14 hours left!

Custom Watercooled Gaming PC Combined with a PS5: Play Everything

PC builders have toyed with incorporating entire consoles into PC cases before – Origin even made some – but the folks at Modding Cafe came up with something that’s truly a sight to behold. The Vietnamese builders made a custom ITX build that watercools both a PC and a PS5.

As you might have expected, the build uses a ton of custom made parts, including the chassis itself. Modding Cafe also designed and made the watercooling components for the CPU and the PS5 motherboard using Bitspower components as the basis. The PC is powered by an Intel Core i9 11900K and an ASUS ROG Strix 3080 GPU. The PS’s Blu-ray drive is also in the build.

Truly a sight to behold. If you want more custom watercooling goodness, check out Modding Cafe’s standalone watercooled PS5, which actually led to the 2-in-1 build.

Apple M1 iMac teardown reveals poor reparability score for the sleek new design

Apple’s 24-inch M1 Mac is a sleek little desktop computer making an impressive statement with its bright and bold color palette. At 11mm, it’s about as thick as the first iPhone that launched in 2007, showing how far we’ve come in the past decade. Now, this 11mm thick beauty houses some of the most capable computing technology in the world, and Apple’s M1 chip powers it. Fun fact, as pointed out by MKBHD, the iMac actually shifts the 3.5mm headphone jack to the side instead of the back because it isn’t thick enough to have the jack travel all the way in! iFixit got its eyes fixed on the latest candy by Apple and wanted to learn more about what lies beneath the sleek design. They were itching to tear apart the iMac after a long time – the last instance was the 21.5-inch iMac teardown which got a measly 1/10 score for reparability.

The new all-in-one desktop has many changes from the past iterations – with the hardware tactically stuffed inside a small space. iFixit carried out an X-ray scan of the iPad-like machine on a stand (in collaboration with Creative Electron) to better understand what’s on the inside. The two metal plates, circular coin cell batteries, and the built-in antenna (not shaped like Apple) are the ones that caught the eye. Then it’s down to the ritual of prying open the machine, “M1 iMac still uses the classic iMac adhesive—it’s not quite the goopy iPad nightmare that we feared.” iFixit finds.

Compared to past iMacs, this one has a single glass piece and no metal chin to make the teardown difficult. Unlike the robust iPad, the M1 iMac goes for screws rather than glue for the most part. The shiny new keyboard and the power unit also undergo a thorough autopsy. Both of these are very tough to get past and very difficult to repair. Even though the iMac is better than the iPad to pry open, it is still not an average Joe’s task. iFixit gives the M1 iMac a reparability score of 2/10 due to the tedious process of removing and replacing the display – which by the way, is the only access point to the inside hardware. To top it off, the internal storage cannot be altered, which is a severe headache in case of data loss or upgrades. And here’s Apple for you – can’t live with it, can’t live without it!

Creator: iFixit for Apple iMac

X-Ray of the iMac

 

This Apple Power Mac series modern redesign matches Tim cook’s vision!

Macintosh paved the way for personal computers way back in 1984 with its graphical user interface, mouse, and built-in screen – which was revolutionary. For those of us who are ratching our brain to remember this product, The Power Macintosh, later Power Mac, is a family of personal computers designed, manufactured, and sold by Apple. Launched in 1994, Apple rebranded the family personal computer to Power Macintosh and then gradually faded out in the latter half of 2006. Described by MacWorld Magazine as “The most important technical evolution of the Macintosh since the Mac II debuted in 1987,” the Power Macintosh was Apple’s first computer to use a PowerPC processor. Software written for the Motorola 68030 and 68040 processors that were used in Macintoshes up to that point would not run on the PowerPC natively, so a Mac 68k emulator was included with System 7.1.2. While the emulator provided good compatibility with existing Macintosh software, performance was about one-third slower than comparable Macintosh Quadra machines.

Power Mac G4 and G5 were the last descendants of the Power Mac brand, and then came the era of MacBook Pro. Decades down the line, Apple, led by Steve Jobs, has morphed into a brand that vows to push computing power and design limits, second to none. To bring back the nostalgic memories of the successful Power Mac series PC’s, Ayush Singh Patel reimagines it in a modern avatar.

Ayush, a lead Industrial and CMF designer at Boat Nirvana, has reimagined the classic personal computer as a tribute to the innovative design team at Apple all these years. His refreshing design chronology for the HomePod Max series (Yes, that’s Ayush imagines the revamped version to be called) begins with the Apple 3 and then goes on to the Power Mac series. If your memory aids you, the Apple 3 was a business-targeted PC by Apple released in 1980. Unfortunately, it didn’t significantly impact the market but marks an iconic step in the evolution of Apple’s design language.

Let’s have a look at these reimagined models through the eyes of the designer.

Concept One

The Apple 3 was unsuccessful probably because it was designed in the early days of the company by the core team. Taking such a huge leap was big risk and according to Steve Wozniak, it was the reason for the failure. Nonetheless, this piece of machinery was pivotal in phasing out Apple 2. Ayush revives the old memories with his Concept One PC that looks modern but still has that age-old Mac charm to it.

Concept 2

Concept 2 by the designer takes inspiration from the Power Mac G4 which saw a major redesign and aesthetics. This modern take on the G4 is dominated by the translucent plastic having a minty blue color in an aluminum shell that’s so modern Apple-like.

Concept 3

Then comes the elegantly designed Power Mac G5 which surprised everyone with an anodized aluminum alloy enclosure. At that time, the PC looked absolute charmer, and now this modern inspiration for Concept 3 pushes the allure a notch higher.

Look at more renders by Ayush Singh Patel of the HomePod Max series, which has Apple’s legacy stamped worldwide!

Designer: Ayush Singh Patel

‘Crash Bandicoot 4’ comes to PC on March 26th

As of today, Crash Bandicoot 4: It's About Time is available on PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X/S (with free upgrades from PS4 and Xbox One), as well as Nintendo Switch. Although Activision Blizzard said the game would arrive on PC later this yea...