These cyberpunk boots will let you walk inside the metaverse without moving from the spot

We might soon be virtually walking on the moon without leaving our homes, thanks to the Metaverse push. With boots that give off a Pacific Rim vibe, you won’t even have to leave the spot you’re standing on and just moonwalk your way to distant worlds.

Virtual reality has been around for decades, but it was only recently that it had made giant strides in making what was once science fiction a reality. While visuals have significantly improved, the illusion of VR is immediately broken when it comes time to interact with the world. A lot of R&D has been poured into making touch input more believable, but that still leaves the problem of moving around the virtual world unresolved. These funky-looking books straight out of a cyberpunk prop set might offer one solution, and you might not look too ridiculous while using them.

Designer: Ekto VR

We almost have the visuals of VR down to a “T,” but there are still a lot of missing elements to make these digital realities almost feel like the real thing. The metaverse is promising to bring us to new worlds, both real and virtual, but our eyes won’t be the only ones that will be making the journey. Hyundai, for example, is envisioning a way to help humans feel a snowstorm on Mars without actually being there, but that still involves people sitting in place, whether in a room or in a moving car.

Moving around virtual worlds feels very artificial when all that we move are our hands or even just our fingers. In some cases, that might be OK since you probably don’t want to walk miles inside a virtual shopping mall or on a tour of the world’s famous landmarks. When exploring unfamiliar places or inspecting industrial sites, however, you might want to actually get a feel for the environment, including the act of walking.

Ekto VR is one of the latest attempts at solving this problem of Location Interface or LI. Some VR systems try to use treadmills to emulate the action of walking, but that feels just as artificial and as awkward as not walking at all. In contrast, the Ekto VR boots ingeniously use motorized wheels to go in the opposite direction and speed as your feet. The effect is that you feel like you’re walking, and your brain feels like you’re walking, but to the people outside, you look like you’re dancing the moonwalk instead.




The boots won’t be winning any awards for design, at least not yet. This hefty and bulky footwear looks more like prototypes than a finished product, and rightly so. They’re still in the early stages of development, so looking nice isn’t really as a priority yet. Then again, you can always mask your apparel in the metaverse, so it might not matter much what things really look like in the real world.

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World’s first metaverse moon-base lets you inhabit the moon and explore it in a virtual lunar rover

You don’t need half a million to sit on a Blue Origin spaceship, just pop on your VR headset and you could instantly be transported to Prague’s first-ever lunar expedition. Titled ‘New Prague on the Moon’, this metaverse moon-base was unveiled at Virtuplex, the largest Virtual Reality laboratory in Europe during the Czech Space Week. Open to the public, visitors could roam around the moon dressed in virtual space-suits, explore the base, and even zip around the lunar surface on a specially designed conceptual rover called the LUNIAQ, modeled on Skoda’s ENYAQ electric car.

The moonbase’s design takes inspiration from concepts of the Global Moon Village by XTEND DESIGN and the research work of space architect Tomas Rousek at NASA JPL. Tomas previously led the design of SinterHab, the first concept of a 3D-printed lunar module using NASA robotics technology. The settlement would consist of prefabricated, 3D printed, and inflatable modules, supported by solar power systems, launch pads, and other infrastructure. Large robots would print modules using lunar regolith hardened by microwave sintering. Radiation shielding would be also robotically assembled from solar-sintered bricks. Greenhouses would provide not only food but also recycle air and water in a closed-loop bioregenerative life-support system.

LUNIAQ is a concept electric lunar vehicle that seats up to four astronauts and even holds the capacity to be controlled remotely. It takes its visual inspiration from SUVs by Skoda (Czech Republic’s most notable automotive export), while being technically based on NASA’s MMSEV platform (Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle). The front of the car pays tribute to the Skoda ENYAQ, although its large windshield uses transparent aluminum instead of the conventional laminated glass found on Earth-based cars. These transparent aluminum panels offer much more resistance to micrometeorites, and coatings of polyethylene offer radiation protection.

Hatches on each side of the LUNIAQ allow the vehicle to plug into the different modules on the base, allowing people to enter the vehicle without needing to don a suit and perform a spacewalk. At the rear, the rover features a ‘suitport’, a dedicated suiting cabin with two spacesuits that occupants can wear. A door on the rear of the suitport lets the astronauts exit the vehicle safely, without letting lunar dust into the vehicle’s main cockpit.

The level of detail on the LUNIAQ is pretty stunning considering it’s still an entirely conceptual vehicle within a purely virtual experience. Designer Tomas Rousek mentions that the rover runs on solar power, thanks to panels located on the top, which store energy in the car’s solid-state batteries. The roof of the rover even houses stereoscopic cameras to scan the terrain and for 3D imaging to enable the remote and autonomous control of the car, and antennas for communication with the lunar base, Earth, orbital stations and other satellites. “Large soft wheels would offer comfortable driving on bumpy lunar surface thanks to Michelin’s Tweel technology”, Rousek adds.

Designers: Tomas Rousek, Yan Bilobrovenko, Katarina Eriksson, Veronika Rabas (XTEND Design)

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Panasonic’s VR Headset looks like something a Metaverse Mad-hatter would wear

Building on the VR glasses Panasonic debuted in 2020, the MeganeX was announced at CES 2022 and follows its predecessor’s steampunk spectacle aesthetic. Betting big on the metaverse, Panasonic is positioning these glasses as smaller, lighter, and more comfortable alternatives to the clunky VR headsets you see today. Despite its small size, the MeganeX has the ability to project 5.2K 10-bit HDR images at a refresh rate of up to 120Hz. It also supports 6DoF head tracking and is compatible with almost all SteamVR applications… all while weighing a mere 0.5 lbs (250 grams), half of what the Oculus Quest 2 weighs.

Designer: Panasonic

It seems like Panasonic has used the past two years to seriously refine its design. The MeganeX look quirky no less, but if I had to choose between a toaster-shaped VR headset and these steampunk bad-boys, you best bet I’d pick the latter. They look impressively futuristic, although I can’t help but chuckle at the two antennas that dangle from the side of each eyepiece! Maybe Panasonic should also provide a set of straps that hook to the antennas and loop around the back of your neck like old-timey spectacles. Now THAT would look funky.

Jokes aside, it seems like Panasonic is more serious about positioning the MeganeX as a pair of consumer-ready VR glasses. They’re designed to fit directly over your face, and although you can’t wear them with spectacles on, they come with built-in diopter adjustment that lets you change the focus based on your prescription eye-power. The gap between the eyepieces can be adjusted too since people have different eye-widths. Notably, the MeganeX doesn’t sport earphones like its 2020 predecessor (maybe they’ve got bone-conducting earpieces instead).

Panasonic’s yet to reveal a release date (or tentative price) for the MeganeX, along with whether they work as standalone glasses or need to be tethered to a computer.

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Thinnest VR headset in the world looks exactly like a pair of sunglasses and weighs just 37 grams

If the EM3 Ether is any indication, the future of the metaverse will have incredibly sleek VR glasses that don’t look like toasters attached to your face.

At first glance, it’s possible that you wouldn’t even notice that the person above was wearing VR glasses. Debuted in Beijing by VR startup EM3 Technology, the Ether currently holds the mantle of the world’s slimmest and lightest VR headset. It looks exactly like an ordinary pair of sunglasses and sits on your face just like one too, but behind that seemingly ordinary veneer is a cutting-edge near-eye optical display system powered by two cameras located on the front of the glasses.

For now, the Ether is a proof of concept for how slim and lightweight a VR headset can be. With current headsets like the Oculus Quest weighing well over 2 kilograms (4.56 lbs), the Ether is radically lighter, weighing a mere 37 grams (0.08 lbs) – roughly the same as your average pair of Ray-Ban wayfarers. This, EM3 believes, will allow more people to wear VR headsets for longer without developing fatigue caused by heavy gear.

The EM3 Ether prototype glass contains two micro-displays, 2560×2560 pixel resolution in full color. For now, the glasses offer a FOV (field of view) of 80° per eye, although EM3 claims that by using a larger format micro-display, the FOV can be pushed up to 100° without seeing any increase in the thickness of the glasses – which measure a record-setting 6.8mm for now.

Given how incredibly slim Ether prototype is (they’re thinner than most phones), it currently doesn’t have the processing capabilities to operate as a standalone VR headset and needs to be tethered to an external device like a smartphone or PC. Nevertheless, Ether sets a benchmark for what to expect in the future and EM3 has announced that a retail model of the VR glasses will probably be ready at the end of 2022. The implications for the technology, however, are far-reaching as companies like Facebook have announced a hard pivot into the metaverse, while there have been rumblings in the past few years that Apple’s been working on their own sleek VR headsets too. Seems like 2022’s going be a pretty interesting year for virtual reality and the metaverse!

Designer: Beijing EM3 Technology Co. Ltd.

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Metaverse keyboard transforms boring computer workspace into a cool 3D space for freedom of productivity!

The Metaverse Keyboard traverses our plain old workspace into a mixed reality workspace – perfectly in cohesion with the core idea of the metaverse and its applications!

Author Nel Stephenson came up with the term “metaverse” in his science fiction novel “Snow Crash” and fast-forward to the present day, it looks more likely we’ll be living in a hyper-realistic world within a digital universe in the near future. Reminds me of the movie Ready Player One, and the rendered 3D virtual worlds will one day be our life. Sounds exciting as well as scary, don’t you think so?

Visionaries are eying the metaverse-dominated future, take for example Mark Zuckerberg with his Meta (formerly Facebook) or Bill Gates with the mixed reality and augmented reality projects such as Hololens 2 headset. Of course, NFTs are slowly becoming popular with the masses, and having a unified ecosystem of the metaverse for applications input methods is most important. So why shouldn’t we go beyond the 2D space for our screen real estate and dive into the 3D realms actuated by a Metaverse keyboard? Something beyond the game and experience themes for daily tasks such as working on the PC?

Product designer Heewon Jung and Designer Dot feed the metaverse dream with the right kind of fuel with their cool Metaverse Keyboard that syncs with the virtual reality and augmented reality technology to go beyond the plane of information for the future work environment. It’s like a 3D world right in front of your eyes while working – with the 3D space actuated joysticks that accompany the keyboard. Yes, the logical progression to your PC mouse which operates in a 2D space. So the idea is simple – when you want to experience the 3D world for better understanding, just take out the cool trackpad dubbed Wormhole on one side of the keyboard, and you jump straight into a mixed reality workspace which is more engaging. The uni-directional touchpad lets you navigate in the 3D workspace, something we never saw in the last couple of decades, ever since we all started exploring our computers.

The peripheral works just like any other keyboard when you’re not delving deep into the metaverse productivity workspace with the Wormhole. This is a concept design of the cool and weird world we are looking upon in the near future for sure!

Designer: Heewon Jung and Designer Dot

 

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Augmented Reality Helmet concept aims at revolutionizing how firefighters rescue civilians

Brave - Augmented Reality Helmet for Firefighters

Technology is best put to use when it gives us powers we didn’t have before. Whether it’s being able to fly using airplanes, see through skin and bones using X-rays, or send each other messages using radio waves and satellites. I’ve long believed that augmented reality has the ability to positively impact life as we know it, beyond just entertainment and games. Microsoft’s Hololens has often demonstrated how AR tech can help remote learning and servicing, whether it’s something as simple as sending instructions to a technician fixing a faulty circuit box or plumbing pipe, or as game-changing as helping doctors learn more about the human body by literally being able to see inside it using virtual, augmented, and mixed reality. A Red Dot Design Concept Award-winning entry, however, is pushing the capabilities of augmented reality imaging to help firefighters effectively assess buildings, find structural weak spots, avoid infernos, locate and rescue victims, and quickly plot safe escape routes.

Brave - Augmented Reality Helmet for Firefighters

The Brave is an AR Headset with a helmet attachment purpose-built for firefighters to use while training and in action. The headset itself comes with an array of cameras along the front that allows the internal chip to effectively plot out its surroundings, and a HUD under the headset’s main visor helps project digital elements on the physical world while the firefighters move around. The outer visor also covers the upper half of the face, preventing dust and debris from making its way into the firefighter’s eyes, while a mask on the lower half of their face remains unobstructed or untouched.

When paired along with the helmet, the Brave is complete as a state-of-the-art imaging, safety, and rescue tool. The helmet comes with lights built into the front and the back, illuminating the path while allowing firefighters to see each other in smoke-filled corridors. The rear of the helmet even comes with a camera lens that allows the AR headset to see what’s behind the wearer too, informing them of any developments. Finally, the hard-hat helmet works as the ultimate head-protecting device, softening the impact from debris that may fall from above, and overall helping the firefighter effectively perform rescue missions without getting hurt. Along with the AR headset, however, the Brave is the ultimate rescue tool. It helps firefighters effectively see behind walls, beyond floors, and observe the building in a way that the eyes cannot.

The Brave AR Helmet is a winner of the Red Dot Design Concept Award for the year 2021.

Designers: Kim Hyewon & Shin Alim

Brave - Augmented Reality Helmet for Firefighters

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Unique VR Headsets designed to break tech barriers + prove this innovative trend is here to stay!

Immersing ourselves in a simulated world, far away from reality is always fun. And hence, Virtual Reality has been gaining a lot of momentum these days! Its applications and possibilities are endless. VR is extending its scope beyond gaming and providing functionality in a variety of fields. From business, education, entertainment to even fitness, VR is being utilized in almost all industries. And we’ve curated a collection of exciting VR designs that prove the true value of this emerging technology. From a virtual reality treadmill to the world’s tiniest VR headset – every single one of these designs will make you pro VR all the way. Enjoy!

Interestingly the internet is going crazy with the freshly leaked images of the insect eyes like the HTC headset that gives off the futuristic vibe. The person in question is trusted leaker Evan Blass who has posted convincing images of HTC’s next-gen VR headset. The big question arises – will this HTC VR headset be able to compete with Oculus Quest 2? Evan has been posting a constant stream of tweets with photos of the said headset, building anticipation for the tech community. For neutral viewers, these images give a much better idea of how the Vive Flow VR headset will look like. It is not much different than the Project Proton concept headset in terms of the alienating presence.

Following the trends of today in regard to retro aesthetics and gameplay mobility, Tsai reimagined Nintendo’s virtual reality experience with Nintendo Switch Joy-Glasses. Tsai recognized Nintendo Switch’s hybridity that allows it to transform from a handheld gaming tablet to a plugged-in video game console for the television. This gives Nintendo Switch players the option of bringing a gaming console with them anywhere, making Nintendo Switch a mobile gaming device. This mobile hybridity gives the Switch a leg-up, and with today’s gamers being so nostalgic, it’s no wonder VR games like Pokémon Go are such global successes. Further, on the game’s market triumph, Tsai writes, “Successfully tapping into 1990s nostalgia, [Pokémon Go] is attracting millions of Millennials…Taking advantage of this retro hype, it’s about time to refashion existing technology and create something unique to connect with more recent generations.”

ConceptsiPhone has created a render of the two upcoming devices by Apple and mashed them together in a video dubbed iPhone 13 VR for creative writer’s delight. The VR headset is open to any imagination possible, and the folks over at ConceptsiPhone have taken that opportunity to show the world how the mixed reality headset will be like. It looks plush (after all it’s Apple) and is in sync with the design principles Apple has put in place for the headset – comfort and lightweight aesthetics. The strap looks reassuring as far as ergonomics go while the padding around the viewable area ensures utmost comfort. The concept shown here retains the iPhone 12 Pro’s DNA for the most part of it, and when you have a look at the rear camera module, it’s fresh nostalgia. The camera bump looks so strikingly similar to the newly launched Xiaomi Mi 11 Ultra flagship.

The latest version of XTAL comes with a host of technical upgrades. Most significant of which is the high-density LCDs with 4k resolution per eye (making a total of 8k horizontally) giving a crystal clear view assisted by foveated rendering capabilities, improved lenses with a 180-degree field of view, and eye-tracking capable of running at 210 fps. That’s not all. It comes with an embedded Ultraleap hand-tracking sensor and conveniently connects to a PC via a VirtualLink cable. Oh, and did I mention that you can get an AR mixed reality module as an add-on? Pretty awesome, don’t you think? So impressive that the US Airforce has already placed an order for the latest headsets to train their pilots in simulations. The people at VRgineers have even designed a helmet-mountable version for such cases.

The creative minds sitting in Facebook’s Reality Labs (FRL), however, have been working on making VR headsets less clunky/bulky, and more like something you’d want to carry around and wear at work or at home. Facebook Reality Lab’s latest prototype VR wearable is, to mildly put it, ridiculously thin, measuring at just around 9mm. Designed to look like a pair of wayfarers, these glasses actually hold display units inside them, and Facebook’s research in viewing optics technology has helped them condense the headset from something that feels like a toaster strapped to your face, to a pair of frames that look like a pretty slick pair of shades.

What the GOOVIS Young changes about VR is that it embraces the technology for entertainment purposes, and does it in the best way possible… not by being a face-mounted computer, but rather a face-mounted display that’s compatible with practically any of your devices. With a 1080p display on the inside that’s designed to feel like a theater with an 800-inch screen, the GOOVIS Young is a universal VR display you can connect to your phone, laptop, tablet, set-top box, or even your console, allowing it to act as a dedicated display for everything between working, gaming, watching movies, browsing the internet, or even doing the odd stuff like tapping into your drone’s camera for incredible HD POV-ing.

With an undeniably better form factor, and better image quality too, Panasonic’s VR glasses are classier and well, ‘glassier’ (as opposed to the massive ski-goggles that most VR headsets look like). Fitted with micro-OLED panels on the inside, the VR glasses can afford to be made smaller and have much better clarity too. In fact, unlike most VR headsets, you almost don’t notice the pixels in Panasonic’s product, allowing your VR world to be much more immersive because of its higher resolution. Panasonic also claims that they’re the first-ever VR glasses to support HDR, or a high dynamic range, allowing colors, saturation, brightness, and contrast to all be incredibly lifelike. The glasses (they’re obviously not headsets) also come fitted with Panasonic’s own audio technology, using Technics drivers in those tiny earbuds to provide crystal clear audio.

I bet you’re just as baffled as I am looking at Canon’s new RF5.2mm F2.8 L Dual Fisheye Lens. It almost looks anthropomorphic, with the way the two eyes stare at you, but in fact, what’s really marvelous is where Canon seems to be going with their cameras. DSLRs and Mirrorless cameras are already some of the most powerful shooters out there, and rather than ditching that entire ecosystem of cameras to move to newer camera types – like drones and AR/VR cameras, Canon has just embraced good old-fashioned innovation instead, with a newfangled lens that is compatible with their existing EOS range of cameras. The lens, when paired with the company’s 1.5.0 firmware update, enables the humble yet capable 2D camera to shoot SBS 3D content. Pair the lens with the EOS R5 mirrorless camera and suddenly you can perform high-resolution video recording at up to 8K DCI 30p and 4K DCI 60p.

Compatible with a variety of games, movies, and multimedia content on platforms like YouTube VR, the Feelreal can generate a variety of aromas and smells, making you feel like you’re in the moment, whether it’s a forest, a race-track, or a battlefield. The Feelreal comes with a series of 9 aroma vials that combine to create as many as 255 different types of distinct smells, from flowers and petrichor, to food, to grease or gunpowder. The Feelreal goes the extra mile by providing a tactile experience too! It comes with its own water-spray, microheater (to simulate heat), and fan (to simulate wind), adding different layers to your audiovisual VR experience.

The Omni One by Virtuix – a virtual reality treadmill that’ll allow gamers to walk or run in 360-degrees inside video games and other virtual environments. The possibilities with Omni are unmatchable – it not only lets you walk but even jump, kneel, and crouch in the gaming world by mimicking the action on the treadmill in real life. Gamers who’ve tasted the VR flavor would have heard the name Virtuix before. The start-up is currently selling a commercial version of the Omni – “Omni Pro” – to entertainment venues in over 45 countries. Now, Virtuix is coming for the first time to our homes with Omni One treadmill aimed at pushing the bounds of in-home entertainment previously set by VR headsets.

Meet the VR Cap, a gadget design that can make bring a radical evolution to the wearable tech world!

The VR Cap fixes one nagging problem with VR headsets today – the head-mount. The solution is so ingenious, it makes you wonder ‘why didn’t anyone think of this earlier?!’

While most VR gear comes with a single strap that goes around the side of your head (or a T-shaped strap that also sits on top), they’re almost always fiddly, uncomfortable, and feel like they’re going to fall off. The VR Cap improves upon that detail by turning the headset into a golf cap-style piece of gear that physically wraps around your head as a cap would.

The level of detail and immersive experience a VR-enabled design brings to the table is unprecedented. Can you imagine, actually being a part of the sci-fi world we admire from afar? Which begs the question, why is VR-enabled content not yet mainstream or popular with the general public. I think a huge part of the problem falls with the excessive nature of the wearable required to immerse yourself in VR. Most designs till now focus on a headgear that covers your eyes, giving you the look of a very googly-eyed creature.

VR Cap solves this by merging the glasses with an existing and comfortable piece of clothing – the humble cap! “VR Cap is the world’s first head-mounted display (HMD) to join a crisp VR display with a detachable, woven head covering”, Compal Electronics mentions. Woven from stretchable fabric, one size fits most heads in comfort, and customizations can be made to accommodate users like ponytails without developing new injection molds.

The detachable fabric cap is machine-washable too, resolving the problem we often face (especially in the COVID-era) with being uncomfortable in the level of sanitization for shared gadgets. The fabric of the cap also unleashes the possibility of a ton of customization, taking this a step closer to mass acceptance.

Designer: Compal Electronics

HTC’s leaked Vive VR headset are honeyed goggles that give you a bug-eyed minion-like look!

Remember the HTC Project Proton concept VR headset shown off in early 2020 that looked like a mix of glasses and ski goggles? The Vive Flow VR headset is the evolution of that very concept and it is coming soon – in fact just a day away from official release at the “Go with the Flow” event set to happen on October 14.

Interestingly the internet is going crazy with the freshly leaked images of the insect eyes like HTC headset that gives off the futuristic vibe. The person in question is trusted leaker Evan Blass who has posted convincing images of HTC’s next-gen VR headset. The big question arises – will this HTC VR headset be able to compete with Oculus Quest 2? Evan has been posting a constant stream of tweets with photos of the said headset, building anticipation for the tech community. For neutral viewers, these images give a much better idea of how the Vive Flow VR headset will look like. It is not much different than the Project Proton concept headset in terms of the alienating presence.

From the images so far, it seems the headset will have a tethered connection to a tube-shaped device to power up the advanced processing of the gadget. There are no straps apparent in these leaked images which suggests HTC has finally found a way to ditch the strap design. How they have managed to balance the weight out will only be clear once the headset is out there for real. Also, the images are highly suggestive of a snap-on face cushion for comfort, adjustable lenses, immersive spatial audio and an active cooling system.

Talking of the possible use case scenarios, the headset will mostly be used for multimedia content consumption and gaming. According to rumors the VR headset will have a microchip less powerful than the Oculus Quest 2, but will come with six degrees of freedom tracking. There are no controllers in view so it is presumed the headset will not ship with one. This will be a major limitation if it wants to go head-butting against the Quest 2.

One of the images suggests the HTC Vive Flow VR headset will be up for pre-order starting October 15th, and shipments are promised in early November. Interestingly it will cost almost $200 more than the Quest 2, at a debut price tag of $499, so it better be good. For all that money you’ll also get seven free virtual reality content and carrying case.

Designer: HTC

 

Canon’s INSANE new camera lens features two side-by-side fisheye lenses for recording 8K AR and VR footage




“A powerful 3D lens for an already powerful 2D camera.”

I bet you’re just as baffled as I am looking at Canon’s new RF5.2mm F2.8 L Dual Fisheye Lens. It almost looks anthropomorphic, with the way the two eyes stare at you, but in fact, what’s really marvelous is where Canon seems to be going with their cameras. DSLRs and Mirrorless cameras are already some of the most powerful shooters out there, and rather than ditching that entire ecosystem of cameras to move to newer camera types – like drones and AR/VR cameras, Canon has just embraced good old-fashioned innovation instead, with a newfangled lens that is compatible with their existing EOS range of cameras. The lens, when paired with the company’s 1.5.0 firmware update, enables the humble yet capable 2D camera to shoot SBS 3D content. Pair the lens with the EOS R5 mirrorless camera and suddenly you can perform high-resolution video recording at up to 8K DCI 30p and 4K DCI 60p.

The bizarre yet beautiful lens unlocks an absolutely new dimension to photography. Just pop it onto the EOS R5 and the lenses use a complex internal optical arrangement to record SBS content on a single full-frame image sensor. When paired with the right firmware, the video content automatically gets split, synced, stitched, and turned into 3D VR videos that can directly be exported using Canon’s own software.

The two lenses offer 190° field of view, and are spaced a precise 60mm apart to resemble the pupillary distance in humans, making the VR content look believable and have just the right amount of parallax too. Focusing for both the lenses is controlled by a single ring, although minor tweaks to the focus of individual lenses can be done using hidden adjustment dials on the left and right-hand sides of the lens body.

It’s low-key marvelous what the RF5.2mm F2.8 L Dual Fisheye Lens does not just for Canon, but for photography in general. It shouldn’t be long before other companies like Nikon, Sony, and Fujifilm begin introducing lenses that allow you to record two channels of video content using a single sensor. Arguably, the sensor would have to be big enough to fit both the channels, and to make sure your videos are high-resolution enough, but what Canon’s unleashed on the camera and VR world is just the beginning. That being said, this lens was designed for a special subset of users (with deep pockets) and doesn’t come cheap. The dual fisheye VR lens sports a hefty price tag of US$1,999, and is set to go on sale in December this year. That’s excluding the fact that you also need a $3,899.00 EOS R5 camera to match.