AT&T expands its 5G network to North Carolina and Kansas City

AT&T's mobile 5G network will expand to three new cities this year. Folks in two of North Carolina's biggest population centers -- Charlotte (above) and Raleigh -- and those in Kansas City will have access to the faster wireless signal. Previousl...

Duke Blue Devils Snag Final Four Berth with 66-52 Win Over Gonzaga Bulldogs


The Duke Blue Devils are advancing to the 2015 NCAA Final Four. Duke snatched a Final Four berth by way of a 76-62 win over the Gonzaga Bulldogs in their Elite Eight Matchup in front of 20,...

AT&T Foundation gives $33,000 to Raleigh’s Digital Connector Program


Earlier this week, the AT&T Foundation donated $33,000 to Raleigh, North Carolina's Digital Connectors program for two community centers.Venessa Harrison, A&T State President for North...

7 Reasons It’s Finally Time To Live In Research Triangle Park


The establishment of North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park in 1959 was aimed at reversing the “brain drain” of graduates from the area’s top research universities seeking science and engineering...

Patterned by Nature: it’s big, blocky and earth-approved (video)

patterned-by-nature-blocky-low-energy-lcd-glass-installation

Quick quiz: which consumes more power, an "energy-efficient" 55-inch LED TV, or the 90-foot "Patterned by Nature" video installation at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences? It's actually a trick question, because the sculpture does eat less power -- just 75 watts -- but then it only has a fraction of the TV's pixels. Each of its 3600 "dots" is in fact a 6-inch glass pane which can vary its transparency, a decidedly more lo-fi approach than similar tech we've seen before, but no less arresting as a result. As the video shows, it combines an eight channel soundtrack with twenty Mario-like animations on its serpentine skin -- ranging from bacteria to flocking geese -- to bring mother nature to the viewer without sapping her energy.

Patterned by Nature: it's big, blocky and earth-approved (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 27 Apr 2012 14:50:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Student’s push to make Raleigh more walkable relies on homemade signs and QR codes

Guerilla urbanism campaign walks the walk in Raleigh with QR code signs
Walking is apparently underrated. So University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill student Matt Tomasulo decided to engage in some "guerilla urbanism" in January with fellow fans of bipedal activity, posting 27 signs at three Raleigh, NC intersections as part of the "Walk Raleigh" project. The cardboard and vinyl signs contained snippets about how many minutes it would take to walk to must-see destinations like Raleigh City Cemetery, as well as QR codes for downloading directions. Like the activity it promotes, Tomasulo says the idea behind the project is simple: It's OK to walk. Apparently, Tomasulo and his buddies did such a great job with the signs that it took the sharp folks at the city government a month to catch on and take the stuff down. The city has since walked back its opposition to the signs, however, and put them back up as part of a 90-day pilot project. In the meantime, Walk Raleigh has turned into a Walk [Your City] Kickstarter campaign to put your wallet where your feet are.

Student's push to make Raleigh more walkable relies on homemade signs and QR codes originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 13 Apr 2012 02:53:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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