This solar panels covered electric car solves the charging time issues of its competitors!

The world is in a health crisis and we are hoping to solve that with a vaccine. But there is another one already knocking at our door – the climate crisis and for that, we need to make changes to our lifestyle. One of the industries making spearheading this change is the automotive industry, they are responsible for a lot of pollution and by switching to electric vehicles we can make a reasonable difference. Aptera is not only a part of this positive wave of change, but it is also the first car that is built like a reverse tricycle!

Steve Fambro started Aptera with the goal of a mobility solution that could overcome electric vehicles’ most glaring problems — range and charge times. The hood, roof, and dash are covered in solar panels to charge on-the-go which extends the car’s range and reduces charging time when you need to make a pit stop. It boasts of a massive 1,000-mile range, of course, keeping in mind it depends on how sunny it is where you live but even if it has a 500-mile range it is an achievement. Aptera was designed to be lightweight and ultra-aerodynamic without compromising on performance, it can go from 0 to 60 MPH in 4 seconds.

Its aesthetics almost remind me of the flying cars in the Jetsons cartoons – sleek and smooth like an airplane for the road. Aptera wanted to deliver efficiency – in manufacturing as well as performance. Even though it is lightweight, it is super safe and claims to have one of the strongest safety cells of any vehicles on the road. Aptera could help its user reduce their carbon footprint by over 14,000 pounds of CO2 per year!

Designer: Aptera Motors

 

If the Cybertruck and the Batmobile ever had a love-child, this would be it.

Bulletproof, sledgehammer proof, enough torque to pull another car uphill, and faster acceleration than one of the fastest coupés in the world. To a layperson, that would sound like the feature list of a Batmobile, would it not?

I’ve honestly wondered what the Cybertruck design language would look like on other sorts of cars, and Khyzyl Saleem’s newest concoction seems to answer that burning question. Saleem’s redesigned Cybertruck assumes more of a low-slung racecar format, with wheels that are just as useful off-road as they are on the tarmac. All in all, Saleem’s redesign looks like the kind of vehicle I’d see Master Wayne sitting in, although it DOES lack that signature all-black paint job.

The redesigned Cybertruck assumes the avatar of an off-road roadster, although it retains the Tesla vehicle’s edgy bodywork. The lack of a truck-bed at the back allows the car to be slightly smaller, while the absence of a roof is made even more noticeable with the presence of a rear-windscreen. The car even comes mounted with fog-lights on the back, which seem to complement the vehicle’s massive wheels… I guess this Cyber-roadster is made for dealing with any sort of road conditions. Extra points if you noticed the hidden pair of rear-wheels, visible from the back.

Designer: Khyzyl Saleem

This BMW Motorrad electric concept is bringing back retro with the WWII-era sidecar!

We love seeing designers get creative with electric bikes! Each one is unique with its features and our current favorite is this conceptual electric BMW Motorrad blended with El Solitario MC elements that is nothing like we’ve seen before in the e-bike world. It is bringing retro sidecars back with a cool new makeover!

This electric motorcycle is designed for long-distance journeys keeping in mind any tough conditions that can come up on the way. The aesthetic has been inspired by the iconic Ural motorcycles with the designer adding his own modern twist on the post-WWII BMW customs. Why is this e-bike different from the rest you ask? Because it swaps the traditional passenger cart for a sidecar which will be equipped with tools and essential gear. The extra storage space also includes straps to hold down the cargo or tools you are carrying and with a flat base, there is room for extra batteries too.

To assist with night vision during long off-road adventures, there are three LED spotlights in the front of the detachable sidecar. The designer gives a modern tribute to the Ural motorcycle with the detailed elements of the design. The smooth yet angular body of the e-bike sports a slate gray paint which gives it a minimal appeal despite its otherwise muscle-y build. The translucent mudguards placed above the thick threaded wheels help to slim down its physical form visually.

It also features a screen display with essential controls that make communication easier with its simple UI. The swingarm supports a slim brown saddle leather seat with handlebar grips. The whole motorcycle is powered by an 18.7 kWh battery supported by the cargo sidecar’s extra supplies. It is still a concept so the exact performance is not known but it was designed for long-range rides and is pretty neat for an electric bike that balances nostalgia with a futuristic build

Designer: Iago Valino

This futuristic vehicle design facilitates irrigation, agriculture and education

Well, 2020 is getting really annoying by the day so I am going to look towards the future. Since I am always told to focus the bright side and be hopeful about the future when the present isn’t great, let’s do it through the design lens. Project Outreach is a modular transport vehicle that was designed to support and develop rural infrastructure in 2045 (of course, this is a concept design so don’t send me an email after 25 years). The conceptual vehicle has a very Tesla-esque aesthetic, it is futuristic without being aggressive like the Cybertruck.

Developing nations need a tech boost to uplift themselves. If the land is mostly flat, the infrastructure is not that hard to create but there are many nations like Africa that have a variety of massive landscapes that will need powerful machines like Project Outreach to do it efficiently. The vehicle’s main aim is reaching out as the name suggests. The goal is to reach the communities in need and provide supplies to facilitate rural development by being a one-stop-shop through its multifunctional modules – Water Mod, Plant Mod, Work Mod are just a few examples. This is meant for micro-communities and the staff will deliver the module to them and change it out when needed.

The Water Mod is equipped with irrigation and sanitation technology to help areas where there is a draught or generally improve water crisis. The Plant Mod comes with agricultural tools to help seed crops in a controlled environment and provide relief for food shortage. The Work Mod is more for research, study, educational needs, and providing a small living quarter. The concept design is something that will be a blessing to refugee communities. Imagine how one vehicle can be a school for a small group of children who have nothing else to hold on to, provide food and water in a crisis with capabilities to expand into a medical space if needed.

Project Outreach makes me hopeful about a future where can empower those who communities who were hard to reach out to. It may be a design but it radiates values and morals that are rooted deeply in kindness and making a positive change – after all, isn’t that what humanity is all about? We don’t have a wand but we have imagination, design thinking and equipment to make it happen so I’ll say that is close enough.

Designer: Alexander Edgington

Post Covid-19 air travel: Redesigned flight seating that makes traveling safe and luxurious

Seats on a business class ticket are dramatically safer than those in economy class. That isn’t because they were designed to be safer, it’s because they were designed around the idea of spacious luxury. James Lee’s butterfly seats explore that very idea to make flight seats safer. By isolating seats, creating partitions, and providing facilities that align with the concept of premium value addition, the Butterfly seats instantly offer a much more safe travel experience by creating dedicated spaces for passengers with lesser chances of spreading germs through interaction.

The seats come in pairs of two and are slightly offset, rather than being side by side. This immediately means you don’t have someone directly beside you, which decreases the chances of socialization. Seats even have adjustable partitions between them to separate passengers, and even have dedicated armrests so you’re never accidentally resting your arm on someone else’s place. Seats come with all the fittings needed to allow you to store your belongings and even work while flying. A dedicated laptop desk ensures you can work while flying, and there are even slots to store magazines and your own pair of in-flight headphones. For parents traveling with little children, the seats fold down to turn into a makeshift bed for youngsters, and if you’re traveling solo with nobody beside you, both the seats can be folded down and covered with a zigzag mattress so you can sleep comfortably – a feature that’s useful for people who are unwell on the journey or for red-eye flights.

It’s simple tactics like this that will help make flying safer and less fearful at the same time. With solutions like the Janus Seat, you end up creating a functioning solution, but run the risk of still dealing with an entrenched sense of fear in the passengers (besides, sitting in that middle seat becomes even less desirable). The Butterfly, however, retains the status quo, with seats that aren’t dramatically different and visors/partitions that don’t look like partitions. By masking the idea of safety using luxury as a design solution, the Butterfly makes traveling safe again while also allowing the experience to be a relaxing, valuable, and comfortable one!

The Butterfly Aircraft Seat is a winner of the A’ Design Award for the year 2020.

Designer: James Lee

Modified Cessna is the ‘largest’ electric aircraft to take flight

Electric aircraft are ever so slightly closer to becoming a practical reality for travel. Magnix and AeroTEC have flown what they say is the world’s largest all-electric aircraft. Their modified Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, the “eCaravan,” flew for 30...

The solution to making flying safer and less scary post-COVID is to integrate safety with luxury

Seats on a business class ticket are dramatically safer than those in economy class. That isn’t because they were designed to be safer, it’s because they were designed around the idea of spacious luxury. James Lee’s butterfly seats explore that very idea to make flight seats safer. By isolating seats, creating partitions, and providing facilities that align with the concept of premium value addition, the Butterfly seats instantly offer a much more safe travel experience by creating dedicated spaces for passengers with lesser chances of spreading germs through interaction.

The seats come in pairs of two and are slightly offset, rather than being side by side. This immediately means you don’t have someone directly beside you, which decreases the chances of socialization. Seats even have adjustable partitions between them to separate passengers, and even have dedicated armrests so you’re never accidentally resting your arm on someone else’s place. Seats come with all the fittings needed to allow you to store your belongings and even work while flying. A dedicated laptop desk ensures you can work while flying, and there are even slots to store magazines and your own pair of in-flight headphones. For parents traveling with little children, the seats fold down to turn into a makeshift bed for youngsters, and if you’re traveling solo with nobody beside you, both the seats can be folded down and covered with a zigzag mattress so you can sleep comfortably – a feature that’s useful for people who are unwell on the journey or for red-eye flights.

It’s simple tactics like this that will help make flying safer and less fearful at the same time. With solutions like the Janus Seat, you end up creating a functioning solution, but run the risk of still dealing with an entrenched sense of fear in the passengers (besides, sitting in that middle seat becomes even less desirable). The Butterfly, however, retains the status quo, with seats that aren’t dramatically different and visors/partitions that don’t look like partitions. By masking the idea of safety using luxury as a design solution, the Butterfly makes traveling safe again while also allowing the experience to be a relaxing, valuable, and comfortable one!

The Butterfly Aircraft Seat is a winner of the A’ Design Award for the year 2020.

Designer: James Lee