Astronomers detect signs of life in the atmosphere of Venus

A team of astronomers believe they have found signs of life in the atmosphere of Venus, The New York Times reports. In two papers published today, the astronomers explain that they’ve detected the chemical phosphine in Venus’s thick atmosphere. They...

Alphabet’s Loon balloons are helping scientists study gravity waves

In between beaming internet to people in developing countries and sometimes passing for UFOs, Alphabet's Loon balloons have been busy helping scientists study how our planet works. A team led by Stanford professor Aditi Sheshadri recently published a...

A tiny space rock holds clues about the evolution of life

Back in 2012, a team of Japanese and Belgian researchers in Antarctica found a golf ball-sized space rock resting in the snow. Now, NASA astronauts have had a chance to study a piece of that meteorite, Asuka 12236, and they say it may hold new clues...

Researchers grew a mini human heart to study fetal heart development

A team of scientists have grown a miniature human heart model. They hope the organoid will help them better understand fetal heart development and defects like congenital heart disease. The Michigan State University researchers used adult stem cells...

Recent damage to the Arecibo telescope could keep it offline for months

It could take several months to repair the recent damage to Arecibo Observatory, SpaceNews reports. During a NASA meeting earlier this week, Lindley Johnson, director of NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office, said the massive radio telescope c...

High-speed camera captures a fluid behaving like a solid

High-speed cameras are useful for capturing the unseen world, and that includes the occasional example of oddball physics. Researchers have used a camera recording at 1,000 frames per second to spot a fluid behaving like a solid. The team put a liqui...

Hitting the Books: Volcanoes, mortal enemy of the mighty telescope

Humans are, as a species, hardwired to explore. We conquered the planet thanks to untold generations of people needing to see what lay over the next hill or around the next river bend and our infatuation with the stars is no different — we’ve wondere...

Puerto Rico’s Arecibo radio telescope suffers serious damage

The Arecibo Observatory -- the second-largest radio telescope in the world -- is in trouble again. Early this week, a support cable snapped, causing a 100-foot-long gash in the telescope’s reflector dish. It also damaged panels in a receiver called t...