Ray-Ban Meta smart glasses can now upload photos directly to Instagram Stories

Meta has updated its Ray-Ban Meta smart glasses to give it more hands-free capabilities, starting with a new feature that lets you share images as Instagram Stories without having to take out your phone. You can just say "Hey Meta, share my last photo to Instagram," if you've already snapped the photo you want. But you can also say "Hey Meta, post a photo to Instagram" if you want to be more spontaneous and take a picture to upload as a Story on the spot. It's for those moments you don't mind sharing with your followers, unedited, in real time. 

In addition, you'll now be able to get your glasses to quickly play your tunes on Amazon Music. Just say "Hey Meta, play Amazon Music" to start listening through the smart glasses' open-ear audio system. And yes, you'll be able to control the audio with the device's touch controls or with your voice. If you have a Calm account and need to decompress, you can listen to guided meditation or mindfulness exercises on your smart glasses instead. To do so, just say "Hey Meta, play the Daily Calm." And if you don't have a Calm account, you can get a three-month subscription for free if you follow the on-screen prompts in the Meta View app. All these features are "rolling out gradually," so you'll eventually get access to them if you don't have them yet. 

Last month, Meta also rolled out multimodal AI for the Ray-Ban smart glasses after months of testing. It enables the smart glasses to act as a personal AI gadget outside of the smartphone, similar to the Rabbit R1 and the Humane AI Pin. Thanks to that update, you can now ask the smart glasses to describe objects in the environment, identify landmarks and read signs in different languages, which sounds especially useful for frequent travelers. Meta also gave the device the ability to make hands-free video calls with WhatsApp and Messenger.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/ray-ban-meta-smart-glasses-can-now-upload-photos-directly-to-instagram-stories-130019041.html?src=rss

Nintendo snaps up a studio known for its Switch ports

Nintendo is buying (PDF) Florida-based studio Shiver Entertainment from the Embracer Group, which is splitting up its rather messy gaming empire and is letting go of certain assets. Shiver was founded in 2012 and is mostly known for working with publishers and developers to port games to the Switch, including couple of Scribblenauts titles and Hogwarts Legacy. Nintendo will acquire the "boutique-sized studio" in full, making it a fully owned subsidiary that will continue working on Switch ports and developing software for multiple platforms. 

The Japanese gaming company isn't known for gobbling up small studios and developers. In its announcement of the deal, it said it's aiming "to secure high-level resources for porting and developing software titles" with this purchase. By buying Shiver, Nintendo is also showing that it's committed to the Switch platform, which will remain its primary business for years to come

As Nintendo Life notes, Nintendo may have decided to purchase Shiver to acquire its talent, as well. The studio's CEO, John Schappert, is an industry veteran who used to oversee Xbox Live, the Xbox platform software and Microsoft Game Studios. He also served as Chief Operating Officer at EA and at Zynga. Nintendo didn't say how much it's paying for the studio, but it doesn't sound like the purchase will make any considerable impact on its finances. "The Acquisition will have only a minor effect on Nintendo’s results for this fiscal year," the company wrote in its announcement. 

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/nintendo-snaps-up-a-studio-known-for-its-switch-ports-100003358.html?src=rss

Wearable AI Pin maker Humane is reportedly seeking a buyer

The tech startup Humane is seeking a buyer for its business, just a bit over a month since it released the AI Pin, according to Bloomberg. Engadget's Cherlynn Low described the AI Pin as a "wearable Siri button," because it's a small device you can wear that was designed with a very specific purpose in mind: To give you ready access to an AI assistant. Humane is working with a financial adviser, Bloomberg said, and is apparently hoping to sell for anywhere between $750 million and $1 billion. 

The company drummed up a lot of interest and successfully raised $230 million from high-profile investors. However, a billion may be a huge ask when its AI pin was mostly panned by critics upon launch. We gave the AI Pin a score of 50 out of 100 in our review due to several reasons. It was slow and took a few seconds to reply when we asked it questions. The responses were irrelevant at times and weren't any better than what you could get with a quick Google search. Its touchpad grew warm with use, it had poor battery life and its projector screen, while novel, was pretty hard to control. The Humane AI Pin also isn't cheap: It costs $700 to buy and requires a monthly fee of $24 to access the company's artificial intelligence technology and 4G service riding on T-Mobile's network. In a post on its website, Humane said that it was listening to feedback and listed several problem areas it intends to focus on.

Another dedicated AI gadget, the Rabbit R1, is much more affordable at $199, but it's still not cheap enough to make the category more popular than it is, especially since you could easily take out your phone to use AI tools when needed. Humane's efforts to sell its business is still in its very early stages, Bloomberg noted, and it might not close a deal at all. 

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/wearable-ai-pin-maker-humane-is-reportedly-seeking-a-buyer-035322167.html?src=rss

Microsoft unveils Team Copilot that can assist groups of users

At this year's Build event, Microsoft has announced Team Copilot, and as you can probably guess from its name, it's a variant of the company's AI tool that can cater to the needs of a group of users. It expands Copilot's abilities beyond that of a personal assistant, so that it can serve a whole team, a department or even an entire organization, the company said in its announcement. The new tool was designed to take on time-consuming tasks to free up personnel, such as managing meeting agenda and taking down minutes that group members can tweak as needed. 

Team Copilot can also serve as a meeting moderator by summarizing important information for latecomers (or for reference after the fact) and answering questions. Finally, it can create and assign tasks in Planner, track their deadlines, and notify team members if they need to contribute to or review a certain task. These features will be available in preview across Copilot for Microsoft 365 — and will be accessible by those paying for its license — starting later this year.

In addition to Team Copilot, Microsoft has also announced new ways customers can personalize the AI assistant. Custom copilots users create from SharePoint can be edited and improved further in Copilot Studio, where they can also make custom copilots that act as agents. The latter would allow companies and business owners to automate business processes, such as end-to-end order fulfillment. Finally, the debut of Copilot connectors in Studio will make it easier for developers to build Copilot extensions that can customize the AI tools' actions. 

Update, May 21, 2024, 1:24AM ET: This story has been updated to clarify that Team Copilot is an assistant that can serve the needs of a group of users and is separate from Copilot for Teams.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/microsoft-unveils-copilot-for-teams-153059261.html?src=rss

Microsoft teams up with Khan Academy to make the Khanmigo AI teaching assistant free

Microsoft and non-profit educational organization Khan Academy have formed a partnership that will allow all K-12 educators in the US to access the pilot version of Khanmigo for Teachers at no cost. Khanmigo is an AI-powered teaching assistant that can help teachers find ways to make lessons more fun and engaging. it will also recommend assignments, display information on a student's performance so that teachers can assess their progress and provide resources educators can use to refresh their knowledge.

The tool can also quickly create lesson plans and suggest student groups for team activities. Khan Academy says Khanmigo can save teachers an average of five working hours every week. The service previously cost educators $4 a month, but Khan Academy has dropped those fees since its Microsoft partnership allows it to use the Azure OpenAI Service to power Khanmigo for free. 

As part of their collaboration, Khan Academy will also help Microsoft train the company's Phi-3 small language models (SLMs) and develop its AI-powered math tutoring capabilities. The organization will give the company access to explanatory educational materials it can feed Phi-3, such as step-by-step guides on how to solve math problems. Khan Academy is hoping that SLMs like Phi-3, which can run locally on devices, will eventually be able to provide teaching help and tutoring for teachers and students in resource-strapped regions. Microsoft will also add more content from Khan Academy to Copilot and Teams for Education so that more people can access the organization's educational library. 

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/microsoft-teams-up-with-khan-academy-to-make-the-khanmigo-ai-teaching-assistant-free-153008848.html?src=rss

Volvo and Aurora introduce their first self-driving truck

Volvo and Aurora have unveiled their first production autonomous truck, three years after the companies initially announced that they were teaming up. They've just showed off the Volvo VNL Autonomous truck, which was designed by autonomous trucking and robotaxi company Aurora but will be manufactured by Volvo, at ACT Expo in Las Vegas. 

It's powered by Aurora Driver, a level 4 autonomous driving system that uses high-resolution cameras, imaging radars, a LiDAR sensor that can detect objects up to 400 meters away and even more sensors. Aurora's technology has driven billions of virtual miles for training, as well as 1.5 million commercial miles on actual public roads. For safety purposes, the truck has "redundant steering, braking, communication, computation, power management, energy storage and vehicle motion management systems."

According to TechCrunch, the vehicle will still have a human driver behind the wheel to take over whenever needed when it starts ferrying cargo across North America over the next few months. An Aurora spokesperson told the publication that it will be announcing pilot programs with its clients that are planning to use Volvo's truck sometime later this year. It didn't name any companies, but the startup previously ran pilot programs with FedEx and Uber Freight. 

The autonomous vehicle company also intends to deploy 20 fully driverless trucks between Dallas and Houston soon, but it's unclear if this inaugural fleet of driverless vehicles will be comprised of Volvo's trucks or of its other manufacturing partners'. The companies did say at the Las Vegas event, though, that Volvo has already started manufacturing a test fleet of the VNL Autonomous truck at its New River Valley assembly facility in Virginia. Nils Jaeger, President of Volvo Autonomous Solutions, called this truck the "first of [the company's] standardized global autonomous technology platform." Jaeger added that it will enable Volvo "to introduce additional models in the future."

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/volvo-and-aurora-introduce-their-first-self-driving-truck-080058835.html?src=rss

Adobe threatens to sue Nintendo emulator Delta for its look-alike logo

Delta, an emulator that can play Nintendo games, had to change its logo after Adobe threatened legal action. You'd think it would face trouble from Nintendo, seeing as it has been going after emulators these days, but no. It's Adobe who's going after the developer, which told TechCrunch that it first received an email from the company's lawyer on May 7. Adobe warned Delta that their logos are too similar, with its app icon infringing on the well-known Adobe "A," and asked it to change its logo so it wouldn't violate the company's rights. Delta reportedly received an email from Apple, as well, telling the developer that Adobe asked it to take down the emulator app.

A purple icon.
Delta

If you'll recall, Apple started allowing retro game emulators on the App Store, as long as they don't offer pirated games for download. Delta was one of the first to be approved for listing and was at the top of Apple's charts for a while, which is probably why it caught Adobe's attention. At the time of writing, it sits at number six in the ranking for apps in Entertainment with 17,100 ratings. 

The developer told both Adobe and Apple that its logo was a stylized version of the Greek letter "delta," and not the uppercase letter A. Regardless, it debuted a new logo, which looks someone took a sword to its old one to cut it in half. It's a temporary solution, though — the developer said it's releasing the "final" version of its new logo when Delta 1.6 comes out.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/adobe-threatens-to-sue-nintendo-emulator-delta-for-its-look-alike-logo-123026491.html?src=rss

Adobe threatens to sue Nintendo emulator Delta for its look-alike logo

Delta, an emulator that can play Nintendo games, had to change its logo after Adobe threatened legal action. You'd think it would face trouble from Nintendo, seeing as it has been going after emulators these days, but no. It's Adobe who's going after the developer, which told TechCrunch that it first received an email from the company's lawyer on May 7. Adobe warned Delta that their logos are too similar, with its app icon infringing on the well-known Adobe "A," and asked it to change its logo so it wouldn't violate the company's rights. Delta reportedly received an email from Apple, as well, telling the developer that Adobe asked it to take down the emulator app.

A purple icon.
Delta

If you'll recall, Apple started allowing retro game emulators on the App Store, as long as they don't offer pirated games for download. Delta was one of the first to be approved for listing and was at the top of Apple's charts for a while, which is probably why it caught Adobe's attention. At the time of writing, it sits at number six in the ranking for apps in Entertainment with 17,100 ratings. 

The developer told both Adobe and Apple that its logo was a stylized version of the Greek letter "delta," and not the uppercase letter A. Regardless, it debuted a new logo, which looks someone took a sword to its old one to cut it in half. It's a temporary solution, though — the developer said it's releasing the "final" version of its new logo when Delta 1.6 comes out.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/adobe-threatens-to-sue-nintendo-emulator-delta-for-its-look-alike-logo-123026491.html?src=rss

Twitter has officially moved to X.com

Twitter officially went through a rebranding almost a year ago, but most of its pages still used Twitter in their URL until now. Now, Elon Musk has announced that the social network is done moving all of its core systems on X.com, which means it's done transitioning into its new identity and scrubbing all traces of the name Twitter and its iconic blue bird logo. As The Verge notes, the website has also edited its landing and log-in page with a note at the bottom that says: "Welcome to x.com! We are letting you know that we are changing our URL, but your privacy and data protection settings remain the same." It then links to its Privacy page, which now uses x.com in its address.

Over the past year, the company has been shedding its pre-Elon Musk identity little by little. It changed its official handle from @Twitter to @X and replaced the Twitter logo on its headquarters building. Its website changed favicons, which initially triggered some browsers' security safeguards, while its apps switched over to the new X logo from its previous blue bird design. Tweetdeck has been renamed into XPro and Twitter Blue became X Premium. The company has slowly been moving its pages to x.com, as well — slow enough that the move became something of a security risk, since bad actors could take advantage of the inconsistent URL to phish victims. Well, now the company is done moving to its new URL, and it's time to say goodbye to one of the last remaining parts of a website that helped shape the social media landscape.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/twitter-has-officially-moved-to-xcom-120028269.html?src=rss

Twitter has officially moved to X.com

Twitter officially went through a rebranding almost a year ago, but most of its pages still used Twitter in their URL until now. Now, Elon Musk has announced that the social network is done moving all of its core systems on X.com, which means it's done transitioning into its new identity and scrubbing all traces of the name Twitter and its iconic blue bird logo. As The Verge notes, the website has also edited its landing and log-in page with a note at the bottom that says: "Welcome to x.com! We are letting you know that we are changing our URL, but your privacy and data protection settings remain the same." It then links to its Privacy page, which now uses x.com in its address.

Over the past year, the company has been shedding its pre-Elon Musk identity little by little. It changed its official handle from @Twitter to @X and replaced the Twitter logo on its headquarters building. Its website changed favicons, which initially triggered some browsers' security safeguards, while its apps switched over to the new X logo from its previous blue bird design. Tweetdeck has been renamed into XPro and Twitter Blue became X Premium. The company has slowly been moving its pages to x.com, as well — slow enough that the move became something of a security risk, since bad actors could take advantage of the inconsistent URL to phish victims. Well, now the company is done moving to its new URL, and it's time to say goodbye to one of the last remaining parts of a website that helped shape the social media landscape.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/twitter-has-officially-moved-to-xcom-120028269.html?src=rss