Google is making it easier to create apps using Chromebooks

Google is making things a bit easier for folks who'd like to create web, Android and/or Linux apps using a Chromebook. The Chrome OS team has unveiled ChromeOS.dev, a hub that includes technical resources and tutorials, code samples from popular apps...

Chrome web apps will soon tout desktop-like speed

If web apps are going to truly replace native apps, they'll need the near-instantaneous responsiveness of desktop apps. That appears to be on the horizon, thankfully. Google is unveiling Chrome tools that will help web apps run as quickly as their...

Tizen’s Role in the Mobile OS Race

samsung-tizen

Samsung made a stir recently when their new Gear smartwatches were announced with Tizen instead of Android.  The same may be true for some smartphones soon.

Tizen is not all that different from Android when you get down to it.  It won’t run Android apps or have Google Services baked in (although it technically could), but it could be considered a distant cousin.  Both are open source and Linux based.  They can even share many similar UI characteristics.

One of the biggest differences with Tizen is the app framework.  Tizen is meant to run web apps created in HTML5 or other similar languages.  HTML5 apps could technically run most other platforms, but Tizen has the benefit of being able to run these apps outside of a web browser.

The great thing about this native support for web apps is that Tizen won’t have to face the same uphill battle of app support that Windows Phone 8 and BB10 have had to face—a hill Google has only managed to climb in the past couple years.  Tizen is very developer friendly and runs any web apps that other phones can run, it just runs them natively.

Like Android, Tizen is very customizable, perhaps even more-so.  Tizen has implemented “dynamic boxes” which are basically what we would get if Windows Phone’s Live Tiles and Android’s Widgets were to have a baby.  They appear to be an actual part of the operating system, not a separate extremity placed on top.

Tizen is flexible beyond just the UI, too.  This is very clear by the fact that Samsung just launched 3 Tizen watches and also has a Smartphone in the pipes.  Tizen could run on anything and already spans several different platforms.  Considering the collection of companies that participate in Tizen development range from Samsung to Panasonic and Intel, don’t be surprised to see watches, phones, tablets, washers, dryers, microwaves, cameras, ultrabooks and all sorts of other electronic items running Tizen at some point.

Android and iOS aren’t necessarily about to be unseated as the two dominant platforms, but Tizen does raise an important question as to just how relevant a mobile platform is.  If your apps work on any phone, then all that really matters is where you store your data.  Apple’s iCloud, Google, Microsoft One Drive, etc.

Although we aren’t likely to be liberated from our mobile OS of choice any time soon, Tizen shows a world in which your platform isn’t as relevant than what you do with it.

Source: Engadget, Android Central

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Google Chrome Compiles Javascript in the Background to Speed Up Web Apps


V8 is the way JavaScript is converted to machine code. And this used to take place on the main line of text. Now however Chrome Beta allows simultaneous compilation which is a relief and a blessing....

Google Drive apps reach the Chrome Web Store and Chrome OS for quicker web work

Google Drive apps reach the Chrome Web Store and Chrome OS for quicker web work

It's a long overdue match, really -- if the Google Drive productivity suite is considered the centerpiece of Google's web app catalog, and the Chrome Web Store is the catalog, why weren't the two combined? Google has seen the light by turning Docs (text), Sheets (spreadsheets) and Slides (presentations) into neatly packaged web apps that can be installed through the Chrome browser. New Chromebook owners won't even have to go that far, as the trio will surface automatically in the Chrome OS app list over the next few weeks. The web app bundles might be simple, but they could be tremendous helps for anyone who wants to punch out a few quick edits while on the road.

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Google Drive apps reach the Chrome Web Store and Chrome OS for quicker web work originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 23 Oct 2012 16:44:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Mozilla opens Firefox Marketplace for Aurora builds of Android, gives mobile a taste of web apps

Mozilla opens Firefox Marketplace for Aurora builds of Android, gives mobile first taste of full web appsMozilla's love of web apps is more than obvious; we just haven't had a real chance to try the Firefox Marketplace that represents a large part of the company's app strategy. The doors are at last open for a peek, although Mozilla has chosen the unusual path of giving mobile users the first crack: Android users willing to live on the bleeding edge of an Aurora build of Firefox can browse and run those web apps in Mozilla's store. Everyone else willing to venture into the Marketplace will have to wait until their own Firefox builds receive a matching update, including that rare group with access to Firefox OS. We're not quite in a rush to try a first wave of apps in an alpha-grade browser. Should you be the sort who thinks that even beta releases are too sluggish, however, your gateway to the Marketplace awaits at the source links.

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Mozilla opens Firefox Marketplace for Aurora builds of Android, gives mobile a taste of web apps originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 19 Oct 2012 01:36:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Jolicloud Open Platform arrives, lets developers put most any cloud service into one hub

Jolicloud Open Platform arrives, lets developers put any cloud service in one hub

Jolicloud has portrayed itself as a sort of one-stop shop for cloud services and web apps, where a single sign-in keeps us on top of everything. It's mostly been limited to big-league content as a result, but that's changing with the new Jolicloud Open Platform. Developers now just have to build JavaScript-based Node.js components that hook their own apps, media and storage into the same central Jolicloud repository we'd use to manage Instagram and Tumblr. More details and full documentation are forthcoming, although the "open" in Open Platform leads us to think there won't be many technical (or financial) barriers to entry.

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Jolicloud Open Platform arrives, lets developers put most any cloud service into one hub originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 18 Oct 2012 14:26:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Firefox 16 final launches with Reader on Android, VoiceOver on Macs and web app support

Mozilla Marketplace in Firefox

Mozilla knows how to keep on the fast track. Just weeks after the Firefox 16 beta first showed, the finished version is ready and waiting. Surprises are few if you were an early adopter, although the update still has some welcome changes for the right audiences. Mozilla is most keen to talk about preliminary web app support for the Mozilla Marketplace, but you'll also find device-specific additions like a Reader Mode for the Android flock and VoiceOver support automatically switched on for Macs. More responsive JavaScript and on-by-default Opus audio playback give existing surfers extra reasons to upgrade. Firefox 16 is immediately available through all the usual channels, so hit the relevant source link if you're ready to live on the not-quite-bleeding edge.

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Firefox 16 final launches with Reader on Android, VoiceOver on Macs and web app support originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 09 Oct 2012 12:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Evernote web interface updated with better sharing, cleaner look

Evernote web interface updated with better sharing, cleaner look

We're huge fans of Evernote here at the Engadget compound (it's great for keeping track of our latest world domination schemes). But, we've got to admit, the web service is clearly the company's red-headed step child. The desktop and mobile apps are undeniably top-notch, but the webapp is just sort of there. Being able to edit your notes and share them from any browser is a great feature, but we wouldn't exactly call it an enjoyable experience. Today the company took the wraps off a revamp that should ease the pain a bit. Evernote is particularly proud of its new shared note design, that offers a much more attractive and interactive look at entries. You can reshare notes, enter a slideshow view or copy it to your own account. The broader redesign is subtle, but refreshing. There are new icons, some color changes and a tweaked top bar that lend a less cluttered feel without removing functionality. There's even a handy button that collapses the sidebar for those of you rocking smaller laptop screens. We also noticed that the new interface seems to load notes with multiple images much faster. You can read about it straight from the horses mouth at the source or just go to the Evernote homepage and check it out yourself.

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Evernote web interface updated with better sharing, cleaner look originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 01 Oct 2012 18:44:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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