NVIDIA is testing an app that unifies GeForce Experience and Control Panel

NVIDIA is testing out a new unified app that lets users adjust GPU settings, install software and fine-tune gameplay, all from the same place. Currently, you have to access the dated Control Panel app and do some heavy menu diving to do stuff like configuring G-Sync. There’s also an entirely separate "user-friendly" app called GeForce Experience for basic GPU adjustments, driver updates and quick settings. So this collapses two different things into one.

The appropriately-named NVIDIA app is just a beta for now, but seems to do a whole lot. You can use it to update drivers, discover and install standalone applications like GeForce Now and make all kinds of GPU adjustments. To further simplify things for PC gamers, you can also use it to fine-tune both game settings and driver settings. It’s pretty much a one-stop shop.

There’s a redesigned in-game overlay for easier access to recording tools and performance monitoring. The overlay also lets you apply various gameplay filters, including AI-powered filters available to GeForce RTX users. The app looks to be squarely aimed at those who balk at the perceived complexity of PC gaming. You can even use it to redeem bundles and rewards and opt into experimental features and new RTX capabilities. 

Speaking of new RTX capabilities, the app lets users easily experiment with that new remix tool that adds AI-optimized upscaled textures to older games. The celebrated Half Life 2 is getting an unofficial RTX remaster thanks to this technology. The app will also have access to a new feature called RTX Dynamic Vibrance that beefs up visual clarity and improves upon the current Digital Vibrance feature found in the current Control Panel app.

To celebrate this beta release, NVIDIA has unveiled a new Game Ready Driver for the survival crafting game Nightingale. This driver optimizes the game with DLSS 3 and adds the company’s Reflex latency-reducing tech. As for the beta, it’s available for download right now. So go ahead and give it a shot.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/nvidia-is-testing-an-app-that-unifies-geforce-experience-and-control-panel-140037038.html?src=rss

Apple Sports puts real-time scores on your iPhone lock screen

Apple today announced Sports, a new iPhone app offering real-time stats for a number of major leagues. Once installed, users can set their favorite team and get a trove of data on their lock screen in the live activities box when the team is playing. Available free starting today in the US, Canada and the UK, the app currently supports basketball, hockey and soccer football. The company added that other sports, including baseball and American football will debut for their upcoming seasons.

There are plenty of reasons you might not be able to watch your team of choice play live. You may have a prior engagement, the game may not be televised, or Todd Boehly has done so much damage to the club you can’t bear to look at it any more. In those situations, push alerts from major sports apps has been a lifeline, but it’s not always entirely reliable.

Now, it has been possible to get this working since iOS 16, if you fancied messing around in the depths of the Apple TV app. And some third-party platforms, like MLB’s homegrown app, would put this data in your lock screen or Dynamic Island. But Apple says that its own setup offers a “simple and fast way to stay up to speed on the teams and leagues they love.” The setup will also sync up with any sports preferences already stored in the Apple TV or Apple News apps.

Of more concern is that Sports will also offer up live betting odds for the games as they’re in play. It’s worth noting it will be possible to deactivate the live odds feature in settings, but it seems like it would have been smarter and less potentially harmful to make that opt-in, rather than opt-out.

Apple Sports is available to download now in English. French and Spanish are supported where available.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/apple-sports-puts-real-time-scores-on-your-iphone-lock-screen-140050382.html?src=rss

Engadget Podcast: Our Apple Vision Pro hangover

We still can’t stop thinking about the Apple Vision Pro. This week, Cherlynn and Devindra chat with CNET’s Scott Stein about our post-review impressions of Apple’s headset. We’ve got further thoughts about using it in public (maybe don’t), the isolation of being sealed off from the world, and the way falling asleep with the Vision Pro on can make you lose your sense of reality. We also discuss Mark Zuckerberg’s impression of the headset, and why he thinks the Quest 3 is ultimately a better product. (We agree, with caveats.) In other news, we explore how Arc’s ad-stripped AI mobile search app may be good for its users, but ultimately bad for web creators.


Listen below or subscribe on your podcast app of choice. If you've got suggestions or topics you'd like covered on the show, be sure to email us or drop a note in the comments! And be sure to check out our other podcast, Engadget News!

Topics

  • Last thoughts on Apple’s Vision Pro with CNet’s Scott Stein – 1:11

  • Arc Browser AI summaries prompts the question “Who makes money when AI reads the internet for us?” – 38:06

  • Waymo self-driving car attacked and set on fire during Lunar New Year celebration – 49:22

  • Stealth piracy app Kimi briefly passed Netflix on Apple’s App Store charts – 52:48

  • Lyft stock spikes after typo in earnings report – 55:12

  • Around Engadget – 56:53

  • Working on – 59:04

  • Pop culture picks – 59:38

Subscribe!

Credits
Hosts: Cherlynn Low and Devindra Hardawar
Guest: Scott Stein
Producer: Ben Ellman
Music: Dale North and Terrence O'Brien

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/engadget-podcast-our-apple-vision-pro-hangover-133021630.html?src=rss

Engadget Podcast: Our Apple Vision Pro hangover

We still can’t stop thinking about the Apple Vision Pro. This week, Cherlynn and Devindra chat with CNET’s Scott Stein about our post-review impressions of Apple’s headset. We’ve got further thoughts about using it in public (maybe don’t), the isolation of being sealed off from the world, and the way falling asleep with the Vision Pro on can make you lose your sense of reality. We also discuss Mark Zuckerberg’s impression of the headset, and why he thinks the Quest 3 is ultimately a better product. (We agree, with caveats.) In other news, we explore how Arc’s ad-stripped AI mobile search app may be good for its users, but ultimately bad for web creators.


Listen below or subscribe on your podcast app of choice. If you've got suggestions or topics you'd like covered on the show, be sure to email us or drop a note in the comments! And be sure to check out our other podcast, Engadget News!

Topics

  • Last thoughts on Apple’s Vision Pro with CNet’s Scott Stein – 1:11

  • Arc Browser AI summaries prompts the question “Who makes money when AI reads the internet for us?” – 38:06

  • Waymo self-driving car attacked and set on fire during Lunar New Year celebration – 49:22

  • Stealth piracy app Kimi briefly passed Netflix on Apple’s App Store charts – 52:48

  • Lyft stock spikes after typo in earnings report – 55:12

  • Around Engadget – 56:53

  • Working on – 59:04

  • Pop culture picks – 59:38

Subscribe!

Credits
Hosts: Cherlynn Low and Devindra Hardawar
Guest: Scott Stein
Producer: Ben Ellman
Music: Dale North and Terrence O'Brien

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/engadget-podcast-our-apple-vision-pro-hangover-133021630.html?src=rss

Apple confirms home screen web apps will no longer work on European iOS devices

Apple has explained why it's disabling progressive web apps (PWAs) in the EU, it wrote in updated developer notes seen by TechCrunch. The news follows users noticing that web apps were no longer functional in Europe with recent iOS 17.4 beta releases. Apple said it's blocking the feature in the region due to new rules around browsers in Europe's Digital Markets Act (DMA).

Web apps behave much like native apps, allowing dedicated windowing, notifications, long-term local storage and more. European users tapping web app icons will see a message asking if they wish to open them in Safari instead or cancel. That means they act more like web shortcuts, creating issues like data loss and broken notifications, according to comments from users seen by MacRumors.

The problem, according to Apple, is a new DMA requirement that it allow browsers that don't use its WebKit architecture. "Addressing the complex security and privacy concerns associated with web apps using alternative browser engines would require building an entirely new integration architecture that does not currently exist in iOS and was not practical to undertake given the other demands of the DMA and the very low user adoption of Home Screen web apps," the company wrote.

However, the Open Web Advocacy organization disagrees, as it writes in its latest blog

Some defend Apple's decision to remove Web Apps as a necessary response to the DMA, but this is misguided.

Apple has had 15 years to facilitate true browser competition worldwide, and nearly two years since the DMA’s final text. It could have used that time to share functionality it historically self-preferenced to Safari with other browsers. Inaction and silence speaks volumes.

The complete absence of Web Apps in Apple's DMA compliance proposal, combined with the omission of this major change from Safari beta release notes, indicates to us a strategy of deliberate obfuscation. Even if Apple were just starting to internalize its responsibilities under the DMA, this behaviour is unacceptable. A concrete proposal with clear timelines, outlining how third party browsers could install and power Web Apps using their own engines, could prevent formal proceedings, but this looks increasingly unlikely. Nothing in the DMA compels Apple to break developers' Web Apps, and doing so through ineptitude is no excuse.

The change, spotted earlier by researcher Tommy Mysk, arrived with the second iOS 17.4 beta, but many observers first thought it was a bug. "The EU asked for alternative app stores and Apple took down web apps. Looks like the EU is going to rue the day they have asked Apple to comply with the #DMA rules," he posted on X.

According to Apple's App Store Guidelines, web apps are supposed to be an alternative to the App Store model. Considering that that the EU's DMA is designed to break the App Store monopoly, the move to disable them altogether is bound to cause friction. The EU, Japan, Australia and the UK have previously criticized the requirement for WebKit to run PWAs, according to the Open Web Advocacy (OWA). 

Apple said it regrets any impact to the change, but said it was required "as part of the work to comply with the DMA." The company has already been accused by developers of malicious compliance with the DMA over fees for developers to bypass the App Store, with Spotify CEO Daniel Ek describing it as "extortion.". 

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/apple-confirms-home-screen-web-apps-will-no-longer-work-on-european-ios-devices-112527560.html?src=rss

Apple confirms home screen web apps will no longer work on European iOS devices

Apple has explained why it's disabling progressive web apps (PWAs) in the EU, it wrote in updated developer notes seen by TechCrunch. The news follows users noticing that web apps were no longer functional in Europe with recent iOS 17.4 beta releases. Apple said it's blocking the feature in the region due to new rules around browsers in Europe's Digital Markets Act (DMA).

Web apps behave much like native apps, allowing dedicated windowing, notifications, long-term local storage and more. European users tapping web app icons will see a message asking if they wish to open them in Safari instead or cancel. That means they act more like web shortcuts, creating issues like data loss and broken notifications, according to comments from users seen by MacRumors.

The problem, according to Apple, is a new DMA requirement that it allow browsers that don't use its WebKit architecture. "Addressing the complex security and privacy concerns associated with web apps using alternative browser engines would require building an entirely new integration architecture that does not currently exist in iOS and was not practical to undertake given the other demands of the DMA and the very low user adoption of Home Screen web apps," the company wrote.

However, the Open Web Advocacy organization disagrees, as it writes in its latest blog

Some defend Apple's decision to remove Web Apps as a necessary response to the DMA, but this is misguided.

Apple has had 15 years to facilitate true browser competition worldwide, and nearly two years since the DMA’s final text. It could have used that time to share functionality it historically self-preferenced to Safari with other browsers. Inaction and silence speaks volumes.

The complete absence of Web Apps in Apple's DMA compliance proposal, combined with the omission of this major change from Safari beta release notes, indicates to us a strategy of deliberate obfuscation. Even if Apple were just starting to internalize its responsibilities under the DMA, this behaviour is unacceptable. A concrete proposal with clear timelines, outlining how third party browsers could install and power Web Apps using their own engines, could prevent formal proceedings, but this looks increasingly unlikely. Nothing in the DMA compels Apple to break developers' Web Apps, and doing so through ineptitude is no excuse.

The change, spotted earlier by researcher Tommy Mysk, arrived with the second iOS 17.4 beta, but many observers first thought it was a bug. "The EU asked for alternative app stores and Apple took down web apps. Looks like the EU is going to rue the day they have asked Apple to comply with the #DMA rules," he posted on X.

According to Apple's App Store Guidelines, web apps are supposed to be an alternative to the App Store model. Considering that that the EU's DMA is designed to break the App Store monopoly, the move to disable them altogether is bound to cause friction. The EU, Japan, Australia and the UK have previously criticized the requirement for WebKit to run PWAs, according to the Open Web Advocacy (OWA). 

Apple said it regrets any impact to the change, but said it was required "as part of the work to comply with the DMA." The company has already been accused by developers of malicious compliance with the DMA over fees for developers to bypass the App Store, with Spotify CEO Daniel Ek describing it as "extortion.". 

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/apple-confirms-home-screen-web-apps-will-no-longer-work-on-european-ios-devices-112527560.html?src=rss

A piracy app outranked Netflix on the App Store before Apple pulled it

Over the past week, an app called Kimi curiously outranked well-known streaming services, such as Netflix and Prime Video, in the App Store's list of top free entertainment apps. Now, Apple has pulled the application... most likely because it gave users access to pirated movies. As Wired reports, Kimi was disguised as an app that tests your eyesight by making you play spot the difference in similar photos. In reality, it was nothing of the sort and instead contained bootlegged shows and movies, including recent blockbusters and award-winning films. 

Its offerings, however, varied in quality in a way that's familiar to those who used to look for shows and movies online before the advent of streaming services. Kimi's copy of the Emma Stone-starrer Poor Things was apparently grainy and pixelated, while other movies available in high-quality copies had ads blocking the view across the top of the screen. The app was incredibly easy to use: Viewers simply had to download it and fire it up to start watching. It was similar to the now-defunct service Popcorn Time, in that it made pirating movies as easy as watching Netflix. Popcorn Time shut down for good in 2022. 

The company told us that Kimi presented itself as a vision testing platform during the review process. It removed the app from its store, as well as the developer from the Apple Developer program, after discovering its bait-and-switch tactics, a spokesperson told us. They added that Apple has no tolerance for scam apps and applications with hidden or undocumented features. 

Apple prides itself on privacy and safety and on making sure the apps it makes available for download are on the up and up. When it revealed how it would comply with the European Union's Digital Markets Act (DMA), for instance, it said any alternative app store that makes its way to the company's platforms will need to have stringent rules and moderation tools comparable to its own. Apple itself may have to start keeping an even closer eye on its App Store, though. Viewers have been expressing their discontent online on having to pay for too many streaming services to be able to watch what they want to, and it seems like more and more people are turning to piracy again. 

Update, February 16, 2024, 5:08AM ET: This story has been updated to add the information Apple shared with Engadget.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/a-piracy-app-outranked-netflix-on-the-app-store-before-apple-pulled-it-132013246.html?src=rss

A piracy app outranked Netflix on the App Store before Apple pulled it

Over the past week, an app called Kimi curiously outranked well-known streaming services, such as Netflix and Prime Video, in the App Store's list of top free entertainment apps. Now, Apple has pulled the application... most likely because it gave users access to pirated movies. As Wired reports, Kimi was disguised as an app that tests your eyesight by making you play spot the difference in similar photos. In reality, it was nothing of the sort and instead contained bootlegged shows and movies, including recent blockbusters and award-winning films. 

Its offerings, however, varied in quality in a way that's familiar to those who used to look for shows and movies online before the advent of streaming services. Kimi's copy of the Emma Stone-starrer Poor Things was apparently grainy and pixelated, while other movies available in high-quality copies had ads blocking the view across the top of the screen. The app was incredibly easy to use: Viewers simply had to download it and fire it up to start watching. It was similar to the now-defunct service Popcorn Time, in that it made pirating movies as easy as watching Netflix. Popcorn Time shut down for good in 2022. 

The company told us that Kimi presented itself as a vision testing platform during the review process. It removed the app from its store, as well as the developer from the Apple Developer program, after discovering its bait-and-switch tactics, a spokesperson told us. They added that Apple has no tolerance for scam apps and applications with hidden or undocumented features. 

Apple prides itself on privacy and safety and on making sure the apps it makes available for download are on the up and up. When it revealed how it would comply with the European Union's Digital Markets Act (DMA), for instance, it said any alternative app store that makes its way to the company's platforms will need to have stringent rules and moderation tools comparable to its own. Apple itself may have to start keeping an even closer eye on its App Store, though. Viewers have been expressing their discontent online on having to pay for too many streaming services to be able to watch what they want to, and it seems like more and more people are turning to piracy again. 

Update, February 16, 2024, 5:08AM ET: This story has been updated to add the information Apple shared with Engadget.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/a-piracy-app-outranked-netflix-on-the-app-store-before-apple-pulled-it-132013246.html?src=rss

The Morning After: The verdict on Apple’s Vision Pro

Apple took its time to get into mixed reality/spatial computing/putting screens on your face. But finally, the Vision Pro is here. Do you need one? Probably not. Will it change the world in a year? Probably not. Is it meant for developers, wealthy Apple devotees and influencers, hoping it’ll pay dividends in content? Yeah.

TMA
Engadget

It also has incredibly sharp, vivid displays, the best augmented reality experiences we’ve ever tried and that Apple knack for intuitive controls and navigation. It’s early days, and if you bought the first iPhone or Apple Watch, you know how that goes. App selections are limited, and battery life isn’t great, but the bigger question remains: Is this the future of computing? Maybe? You should read Devindra Hardawar’s full review, right here.

— Mat Smith

​​You can get these reports delivered daily direct to your inbox. Subscribe right here!

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Meta and TikTok sue over paying the EU’s fee for policing content

Platforms with over 45 million users have to comply with EU stipulations.

TikTok owner ByteDance and Meta are not keen on the idea of paying the European Union to regulate them. The companies have challenged a supervisory fee set by EU moderators, who are now required to monitor Meta, TikTok and other major platforms under the Digital Services Act (DSA).

All designated companies must split the €45.2 million ($48.7 million) EU regulators argue is necessary to properly supervise these companies. However, companies like Amazon and Pinterest, which reported little to no profits, owe nothing. Meta, on the other hand, received a €11 million ($11.9 million) bill under the current arrangement. ByteDance has not publicly announced how much it owes. But a lawsuit might be cheaper.

Continue reading.

Google’s Bard AI chatbot is now Gemini

And has its own Android app.

Just like Microsoft did with Bing to Copilot, Google is trying to simplify its AI chatbot universe — while confusing everyone. Bard and Duet AI are now Gemini, named after Google’s multimodal AI model. Google has also debuted a dedicated Gemini Android app alongside a paid version of the chatbot. Install that app and you can replace Google Assistant as the default on your Android phone. Along with immediate access to Gemini, the overlay will offer contextual suggestions, such as generating a description for a photo you just took or asking for more information about an article.

Continue reading.

Homeworld 3 delayed again until May

The decision was in response to playtesting feedback.

TMA
Blackbird Interactive/Gearbox Publishing

Once again, Homeworld 3, the much-anticipated sequel to 20-year-old real-time strategy game Homeworld 2, is delayed. The game was originally pegged for a 2022 release, then 2023, then February 2024, then March 8. It’s now set to come out on May 13, 2024.

For now.

Continue reading.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/the-morning-after-the-verdict-on-apples-vision-pro-121550566.html?src=rss

YouTube reportedly has an Apple Vision Pro app on its roadmap

Google reportedly plans to develop a YouTube app for the Apple Vision Pro. The Verge says a YouTube spokesperson confirmed the company’s plans to make a native Vision Pro app, while it optimizes YouTube for Safari as a stopgap. The U-turn comes after developer Christian Selig (creator of the popular Apollo app that Reddit killed in 2023) launched an unofficial YouTube app for Apple’s $3,500 headset.

“We’re excited to see Vision Pro launch and we’re supporting it by ensuring YouTube users have a great experience in Safari,” YouTube spokesperson Jessica Gibby reportedly wrote in an email to The Verge’s Nilay Patel. “We do not have any specific plans to share at this time, but can confirm that a Vision Pro app is on our roadmap.”

Despite Vision Pro launching with over 600 native apps, YouTube said as recently as January 19 that it had no plans for a Vision Pro app. (Netflix is another high-profile holdout.) In addition, a YouTube company spokesperson told Engadget at the time it also had no plans to make its iPad app available on the visionOS App Store. Porting iPad apps is the (relatively) quick and easy way for developers to get their software onto Apple’s “spatial computing” device.

Promotional image for the Juno (YouTube) app for Apple Vision Pro. A floating screen shows a YouTube video of a person wearing the headset. A living room is visible behind the floating display.
Juno, developer Christian Selig’s unofficial YouTube app for Vision Pro
Christian Selig / Juno

Something changed the company’s mind in the last two-and-a-half weeks. One theory is, despite its staggering $3,500 price, Apple’s mixed reality headset appears to be off to a strong start as the company’s most loyal and deep-pocketed fans quickly scooped up pre-orders. Well-sourced analyst Ming-Chi Kuo estimated Apple sold somewhere between 160,000 and 180,000 headsets during its opening weekend.

Another theory is that YouTube noticed an independent developer picking up its slack. Christian Selig, the maker of the now-defunct Apollo for Reddit app, launched an unofficial third-party YouTube app called Juno that was available at launch. Selig has significant trust and stature among Apple device users: He’s a former Apple developer and creator of one of iOS users’ favorite Reddit apps (before the company’s controversial API rules effectively killed most third-party Reddit apps).

“YouTube is probably one of the parts of the internet I consume the most, so I was more than a little sad when YouTube announced that they don’t have plans to build a visionOS app, and disabled the option to load the iPad app,” Selig explained last week in a blog post. “This leaves you with Safari, and the website is okay, but definitely doesn’t feel like a visionOS app.”

YouTube supports 3D and 360-degree videos, but neither currently works on Vision Pro. It isn’t yet clear if the company plans to incorporate those into its app.

This article originally appeared on Engadget at https://www.engadget.com/youtube-reportedly-has-an-apple-vision-pro-app-on-its-roadmap-210710272.html?src=rss