The Nothing phone (1) launch event was an oddly informal alternative to Apple’s polished keynotes

This keynote could have been an email…

After leaking the entire design online and giving tech YouTubers a first look, there was little left for Carl Pei to tell us about the phone… and that’s precisely what he did. First, he sat at a local cafe, and then moved to a tiny empty auditorium, seated for a majority of the event unlike any executive from your typical Silicon Valley keynote event. All this, Carl said, was Nothing’s way of challenging the status quo by being more ‘authentic’ (the event, he claimed, was also filmed entirely on the phone (1)). The cameras then moved to a corporate/community event in London, where the focus went from the phone itself to the company partners and design/development team. With as many as 80,000 people watching online, this was an odd way to reveal a product they hyped for so long. One person in the comments said, “Can’t believe we waited this long just to be told what we already knew about the phone”.

Back last month I predicted that the phone (1) design leak would put a lot of pressure on the company to have a grand slam launch. After leaking first the glyph, then the design, then the features, and then the tech specs, there was ‘nothing’ left to say about the phone. Heck, people even roughly knew what this thing was going to be priced at and where it was going to sell. However, I present to you, the Nothing phone (1).

Pei described the phone (1)’s glyph interface in detail, highlighting (quite literally) how it instantly set the smartphone apart from the sea of existing phones out there. The frame comes made of aluminum, making the phone (1) feel significantly lighter than the iPhone pro series, which comes with a stainless steel frame. Pei mentioned that the aluminum used in the frame was entirely recycled, and half the plastics used in the phone (1) were bioplastics too. The phone (1) is also the first known smartphone to also recycle all the tin used in its internal soldering, but whether the phone (1) is easily repairable wasn’t really discussed at all.

The front and back panels are both Gorilla Glass 5, although there was no official mention of how durable the phone is, and what degree of waterproofing it has (it would be a shame for water to leak into the back and condense around the glyph interface. The phone comes outfitted with Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 778G+ processor, and Pei was especially eager to fire shots at other companies for their bloated OS, pointing how lightweight the Nothing OS was (although that’s available as a launcher for regular Android phones too). The OS also is built around interoperability and interconnectedness, as Carl mentioned the company worked with Tesla to allow the phone (1) to remotely operate your EV, letting you remotely blink its headlights or switch the AC on. This does leave us desiring for more, given that Pei’s boasted so much about how Nothing is creating its open ecosystem.

All in all though, the phone (1) is an objectively good phone on paper and remains to be proved by reviewers in the coming weeks. The screen has uniform bezels thanks to the use of a flexible OLED (something that even top-notch Android phones today don’t offer) and comes with a 120Hz refresh rate for smooth buttery transitions and usage. It also supports 10 million colors with HDR10+ rivaling the Dolby Vision in the iPhone. The phone (1) as is clearly evident, comes with two cameras on the back, although Pei mentions they’re both built to be ‘primary cameras’ with 50MP Sony sensors behind each (one of them is a 114° ultra-wide camera, slightly lesser than apple’s own 120° ultrawide shooter… but the most understated yet important feature on the phone (1) remains its price, which starts at £399 GBP (or $475 USD). While this won’t put a dent in the iPhone sales (the phone (1) won’t even sell in USA), it’s definitely going to make other Android companies bleed… mainly OnePlus. I’m sure that’ll make Pei smile just a little bit.

The post The Nothing phone (1) launch event was an oddly informal alternative to Apple’s polished keynotes first appeared on Yanko Design.

The Engadget guide to the best midrange smartphones

A great smartphone doesn’t have to cost a fortune. Years of commoditization have brought features once exclusive to high-end devices – including big batteries, multi-camera arrays and high refresh rate displays – down to their more affordable siblings. As one of Engadget’s resident mobile geeks, I’ve reviewed dozens of midrange devices. So I’m here to help you figure out what features to prioritize when trying to find a phone for less than $600.

What is a midrange phone, anyway?

While the term shows up frequently in articles and videos, there isn’t an agreed-upon definition for “midrange” beyond a phone that isn’t a flagship or an entry-level option. For this guide, our recommendations cost between $400 and $600. Any less and you should expect significant compromises. If your budget is higher, though, you should consider flagships like the iPhone 13 and Galaxy S22.

What factors should you consider when buying a midrange smartphone?

Buying a new device can be intimidating, but a few questions can help guide you through the process. First: what platform do you want to use? If the answer is iOS, that narrows your options down to exactly one phone. (Thankfully, it’s great.) And if you’re an Android fan, there’s no shortage of compelling options. Both platforms have their strengths, so you shouldn’t rule either out.

Obviously, also consider how much you’re comfortable spending. Even spending $100 more can get you a dramatically better product. And manufacturers tend to support their more expensive devices for longer. It’s definitely worth buying something toward the top limit of what you can afford.

Having an idea of your priorities will help inform your budget. Do you want a long-lasting battery? Do you value speedy performance above all else? Or would you like the best possible cameras? While they continue to improve every year, midrange phones still involve some compromises, and knowing what’s important to you will make choosing one easier.

Lastly, pay attention to wireless bands and network compatibility. If you don’t want to worry about that, your best bet is to buy directly from your carrier. To make things easier, all the phones we recommend are compatible with every major US wireless provider and can be purchased unlocked. 

What won’t you get from a midrange smartphone?

Every year, the line between midrange and flagship phones gets blurrier as more upmarket features trickle down. When we first published this guide in 2020, it was difficult to find $500 devices with waterproofing or 5G. Now, the biggest thing you might miss out on is wireless charging. Just remember to budget for a power adapter too – many companies have stopped including them. Performance has improved in recent years, but can still be hit or miss as most midrange phones use slower processors that can struggle with multitasking. Thankfully, their cameras have improved dramatically, and you can typically expect at least a dual-lens system on most handsets below $600.

Engadget picks

The best midrange Android phone: Pixel 6a

A Pixel 6a lying face up on a wooden surface, and a white Pixel 6a laying next to it.
Sam Rutherford / Engadget

There’s a lot to like about Google's Pixel 6a. For one, it features the best cameras at this price. It may not have as many lenses as some of the other options on this list, but thanks to Google’s expertise in computational photography, the 6a delivers pictures that are on par with phones that cost hundreds more. Nighttime photos in particular are stellar thanks in part to Night Sight, which helps brighten up dim environments and bring out more detail.

The Pixel 6a has a few other things going for it. Thanks to its large battery and efficient chipset, you won’t have to worry about running out of juice. It lasted just over 19 hours in our battery testing, and Google's Tensor chipset allows the 6a to run very similarly to the flagship Pixel 6 and 6 Pro handsets. And those who plan to hang on to their smartphone for as long as possible will appreciate that Google plans to support the 6a with software updates for the next five years.

In addition to its solid battery life and performance, the Pixel 6a even has some advanced features you may not expect to see on a midrange phone. Its design looks very similar to the flagship models with the striking camera bar on the handset's rear top half, and it has a 2,400 x 1,080 resolution OLED touchscreen with an under-display fingerprint sensor. You'll only get a refresh rate of 60Hz on the 6a, but that's a small sacrifice to make when you're getting a number of other features at a killer price.

Buy Pixel 6a at Amazon - $449

The best (and only) iPhone under $600: iPhone SE

The iPhone SE (2022) held in a hand.
Cherlynn Low / Engadget

If you can get past its dated design and small 5.4-inch display, the iPhone SE is the fastest phone you can buy for less than $600. No other device on this list has a processor that comes close to the SE’s A15 Bionic. What’s more, you can expect Apple to support the 2022 model for years to come. The company is only just ending support for the first-generation SE after six years. The company hasn’t said how long it intends to furnish the latest SE with new software, but it’s likely to support the device for a similar length of time.

For all its strengths, the iPhone SE is held back by a dated display. Not only is the SE’s screen small and slow, but it also uses an IPS panel instead of an OLED, meaning it can’t deliver deep blacks. Additionally, that screen is surrounded by some of the largest bezels you’ll find on a modern phone. That’s not surprising. The SE uses the design of the iPhone 6, which will be a decade old in two years. And if the SE looks dated now, it will only feel more tired in a few years.

Shop iPhone SE at Apple

The midrange phone with the best screen: Samsung Galaxy A53 5G

A photo of the front of the Samsung Galaxy A53, showing the phone's 6.5-inch Super AMOLED display with 120Hz refresh rate.
Igor Bonifacic / Engadget

For the best possible display at this price, look no further than Samsung’s $450 Galaxy A53 5G. It features a 6.5-inch Super AMOLED display that is ideal for watching TV shows and movies. Plus the 120Hz panel is the fastest on this list. Other standout features include a 5,000mAh battery and versatile camera system. The A53’s three cameras may not deliver photos with the same detail and natural colors as the Pixel 6a, but it can capture bigger scenes with its two wide-angle lenses.

Like the other Android phones on this list, the A53 isn’t the fastest performer. At best, Samsung’s Exynos 1280 is a lateral move from the Snapdragon 750G found in the Galaxy A52 5G. And though the A53 is $50 cheaper than its predecessor, it no longer comes with a power adapter and headphone jack, so the difference may not end up being much.

Buy Galaxy A53 5G at Samsung - $450

An ultra-budget 5G option: OnePlus Nord N200 5G

OnePlus Nord N200 5G
Brian Oh / Engadget

If you only have around $200 to spend on your next phone, you could do a lot worse than the OnePlus Nord N200 To start, it features a big 5,000mAh battery that will easily last you a full day. The N200 also has a 90Hz display and 5G connectivity, which are tricky to find at this price. Best of all, it doesn’t look like a budget product.

But the N200 is also a good illustration of why you should spend more if you can. I the slowest device on this list, due to its Snapdragon 480 chipset and paltry 4GB of RAM. Its triple main camera system is serviceable during the day but struggles in low light and doesn’t offer much versatility beyond a disappointing macro lens. OnePlus also doesn’t plan to update the phone beyond the soon-to-be-outdated Android 12. In short, the N200 is unlikely to last you as long as any of the other recommendations on this list.

Buy OnePlus Nord N200 at Amazon - $240

Chris Velazco contributed to this report.

The Engadget guide to the best midrange smartphones

A great smartphone doesn’t have to cost a fortune. Years of commoditization have brought features once exclusive to high-end devices – including big batteries, multi-camera arrays and high refresh rate displays – down to their more affordable siblings. As one of Engadget’s resident mobile geeks, I’ve reviewed dozens of midrange devices. So I’m here to help you figure out what features to prioritize when trying to find a phone for less than $600.

What is a midrange phone, anyway?

While the term shows up frequently in articles and videos, there isn’t an agreed-upon definition for “midrange” beyond a phone that isn’t a flagship or an entry-level option. For this guide, our recommendations cost between $400 and $600. Any less and you should expect significant compromises. If your budget is higher, though, you should consider flagships like the iPhone 13 and Galaxy S22.

What factors should you consider when buying a midrange smartphone?

Buying a new device can be intimidating, but a few questions can help guide you through the process. First: what platform do you want to use? If the answer is iOS, that narrows your options down to exactly one phone. (Thankfully, it’s great.) And if you’re an Android fan, there’s no shortage of compelling options. Both platforms have their strengths, so you shouldn’t rule either out.

Obviously, also consider how much you’re comfortable spending. Even spending $100 more can get you a dramatically better product. And manufacturers tend to support their more expensive devices for longer. It’s definitely worth buying something toward the top limit of what you can afford.

Having an idea of your priorities will help inform your budget. Do you want a long-lasting battery? Do you value speedy performance above all else? Or would you like the best possible cameras? While they continue to improve every year, midrange phones still involve some compromises, and knowing what’s important to you will make choosing one easier.

Lastly, pay attention to wireless bands and network compatibility. If you don’t want to worry about that, your best bet is to buy directly from your carrier. To make things easier, all the phones we recommend are compatible with every major US wireless provider and can be purchased unlocked. 

What won’t you get from a midrange smartphone?

Every year, the line between midrange and flagship phones gets blurrier as more upmarket features trickle down. When we first published this guide in 2020, it was difficult to find $500 devices with waterproofing or 5G. Now, the biggest thing you might miss out on is wireless charging. Just remember to budget for a power adapter too – many companies have stopped including them. Performance has improved in recent years, but can still be hit or miss as most midrange phones use slower processors that can struggle with multitasking. Thankfully, their cameras have improved dramatically, and you can typically expect at least a dual-lens system on most handsets below $600.

Engadget picks

The best midrange Android phone: Pixel 5a with 5G

Google Pixel 5a
Terrence O'Brien / Engadget

It may look dull, but there’s a lot to like about Google’s $450 Pixel 5a. For one, it features the best cameras at this price. It may not have as many lenses as some of the other options on this list, but thanks to Google’s expertise in computational photography, the 5a delivers pictures that are on par with phones that cost hundreds more.

The Pixel 5a has a few other things going for it. Thanks to its large 4,680mAh battery and efficient chipset, you won’t have to worry about running out of juice. In fact, Engadget managing editor Terrence O’Brien found he could easily get a full day of use. The 5a also supports 5G and is certified IP67 for water and dust-proofing. Plus, as a Pixel phone, the 5a will receive the latest updates and security fixes from Google weeks and months before other Android phones.

Of course, no $450 phone is perfect. The Pixel 5a has an aging Snapdragon 765G chipset, and you can find plenty of midrange phones with more responsive displays.

One thing to note: The Pixel 6a is right around the corner and will go on sale on July 28th for $449. I suggest waiting until Engadget gets a review unit so you have details on things like battery life and performance before you make a decision.

Buy Pixel 5a 5G at Amazon - $450

The best (and only) iPhone under $600: iPhone SE

The iPhone SE (2022) held in a hand.
Cherlynn Low / Engadget

If you can get past its dated design and small 5.4-inch display, the iPhone SE is the fastest phone you can buy for less than $600. No other device on this list has a processor that comes close to the SE’s A15 Bionic. What’s more, you can expect Apple to support the 2022 model for years to come. The company is only just ending support for the first-generation SE after six years. The company hasn’t said how long it intends to furnish the latest SE with new software, but it’s likely to support the device for a similar length of time.

For all its strengths, the iPhone SE is held back by a dated display. Not only is the SE’s screen small and slow, but it also uses an IPS panel instead of an OLED, meaning it can’t deliver deep blacks. Additionally, that screen is surrounded by some of the largest bezels you’ll find on a modern phone. That’s not surprising. The SE uses the design of the iPhone 6, which will be a decade old in two years. And if the SE looks dated now, it will only feel more tired in a few years.

Shop iPhone SE at Apple

The midrange phone with the best screen: Samsung Galaxy A53 5G

A photo of the front of the Samsung Galaxy A53, showing the phone's 6.5-inch Super AMOLED display with 120Hz refresh rate.
Igor Bonifacic / Engadget

For the best possible display at this price, look no further than Samsung’s $450 Galaxy A53 5G. It features a 6.5-inch Super AMOLED display that is ideal for watching TV shows and movies. Plus the 120Hz panel is the fastest on this list. Other standout features include a 5,000mAh battery and versatile camera system. The A53’s three cameras may not deliver photos with the same detail and natural colors as the Pixel 5a, but it can capture bigger scenes with its two wide-angle lenses.

Like the other Android phones on this list, the A53 isn’t the fastest performer. At best, Samsung’s Exynos 1280 is a lateral move from the Snapdragon 750G found in the Galaxy A52 5G. And though the A53 is $50 cheaper than its predecessor, it no longer comes with a power adapter and headphone jack, so the difference may not end up being much.

Buy Galaxy A53 5G at Samsung - $450

An ultra-budget 5G option: OnePlus Nord N200 5G

OnePlus Nord N200 5G
Brian Oh / Engadget

If you only have around $200 to spend on your next phone, you could do a lot worse than the OnePlus Nord N200 To start, it features a big 5,000mAh battery that will easily last you a full day. The N200 also has a 90Hz display and 5G connectivity, which are tricky to find at this price. Best of all, it doesn’t look like a budget product.

But the N200 is also a good illustration of why you should spend more if you can. I the slowest device on this list, due to its Snapdragon 480 chipset and paltry 4GB of RAM. Its triple main camera system is serviceable during the day but struggles in low light and doesn’t offer much versatility beyond a disappointing macro lens. OnePlus also doesn’t plan to update the phone beyond the soon-to-be-outdated Android 12. In short, the N200 is unlikely to last you as long as any of the other recommendations on this list.

Buy OnePlus Nord N200 at Amazon - $240

Chris Velazco contributed to this report.

Sony Xperia 1 IV proves that speed is everything when it comes to camera phones

Sony remains a popular brand in consumer electronics. It’s one of those few tech giants that has entered multiple industries, from entertainment to gaming to appliances to mobile devices.

Sony hasn’t left the smartphone arena, and we believe it will continue to do so until people patronize the Xperia line. This smartphone series is a favorite among mobile photography enthusiasts for its professional and DSLR-level features. The latest is the Xperia 1 IV, another powerful premium phone running on Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 processor.

Designer: Sony

Sony Xperia 1 IV Features

The Xperia phone series’ aesthetics have not changed much, but this new model reminds us a bit of an iPhone. There is no more of that familiar pointed boxy form because the corners are now curved. If you know the Sony Xperia 5 III, this new phone looks more like it, especially with the same pill-shaped camera module.

The Xperia 1 IV is expensive compared to the latest flagship phones in the market. It costs $1,600, which is about the same price as a premium foldable smartphone. This flagship device has a 6.5-inch 4K OLED screen 120Hz refresh rate and a 21:9 aspect ratio. It uses Qualcomm Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 chipset with 512GB storage and 12GB of RAM. The onboard memory is expandable up to 1TB with a microSD card.

Sony Xperia 1 IV Features

The Xperia 1 IV boasts a triple camera system on the rear when it comes to imaging. All lenses are 12MP but come with 16mm ultra-wide 16mm + 24mm wide-angle 24mm+ telephoto with 85-125mm true optical zoom. This means shooting with zoom will yield improved results.

The phone runs on a 5000mAh battery with wireless and fast charging support. Mobile security is accessible via the power button with an embedded fingerprint scanner. Other features include a dedicated camera shutter button, dual front-facing speakers, and a 3.5mm headphone jack.

Sony Xperia 1 IV Design

The Music Pro enhances the audio experience as it can record songs studio-style. The phone can capture 4K HDR 120fps video on all cameras. There’s also live video streaming, Eye AF, and Object tracking technologies. The latter can be helpful to videographers as the camera features are easy to understand and operate. Object Tracking helps in tracking a moving subject automatically. The feature helps keep objects in sharp focus even if they are not still.

Sony Xperia 1 IV Details

The phone also features built-in live streaming features for mobile gamers and videographers. Specifically, the Videography Pro features are for creative control in video streaming and recording. The display is protected by a Corning Gorilla Glass VictuS and IP65/68 water resistance. There’s also the standard Bluetooth connectivity, 3.5mm headphone jack, and full-stage stereo speakers. The 360 Reality Audio support is also available and very evident with the full-stage front-facing stereo speakers.

Sony Xperia 1 IV Images

Sony Xperia 1 IV

The post Sony Xperia 1 IV proves that speed is everything when it comes to camera phones first appeared on Yanko Design.

This Anti-Glare Umbrella for Smartphones Is a Real Product That Exists

Because if you make it, somebody, somewhere, is going to buy it, VIVOUNITY has created the Phone Umbrella Suction Cup Stand (affiliate link), a device that acts as both a smartphone sunshade as well as a stand. Wow, what will they think of next? Hopefully, something more practical and less ridiculous looking.

The silicone suction cup stand was designed to look like a little pig (the one that went to market or stayed home?), and the umbrella slides between its buttcheeks to prevent glare and/or unwanted eyes and judgment while you lose at Wordle. Me? If I don’t guess Wordle on the first guess, I just close the window. I’m a perfectionist. Also, I’m terrible at word games.

The umbrella is available in a variety of different colors and patterns to ensure you’re able to recognize your phone after the wind catches the umbrella and blows it down the street. Or to Oz. You just better hope it doesn’t land on a wicked witch, or her sister is going to come after you with her flying monkeys. Trust me; I’ve seen movies. Mostly scrambled ones on Cinemax! Please don’t tell my parents.

[via DudeIWantThat]

The expandable seat of this smart mobility device can be controlled from your smartphone 

GoSolo is a universal, smart, personal mobility device designed for people to move seamlessly through indoor spaces and controlled outdoor environments.

There’s nothing worse than running late for a flight and having to sprint through the airport with at least two bags in each hand and one hanging from your shoulders. Before you even make it to your terminal, you’re out of breath and your arms are losing circulation. The trek intensifies for those who might require some mobility assistance, like wheelchairs or scooters.

Designers: Alabaster Research and Technologies Private Limited x Prem Shah, Kirti Khadia, Kishan Amin, Chintan Shinde

 

While motorized assistive devices are typically reserved for those with limited mobility, one company believes there’s a larger market for them. GoSolo, a personal mobility device, designed by Alabaster Research and Technologies Private Limited is a smart, universal mobility solution designed for people to move through indoor spaces and controlled outdoor environments with ease.

Expandable by design, GoSolo’s defining feature is its seat that can rise to a height of 71-centimeters. In this mode, users can still drive GoSolo from an elevated height. The semi-standing position was built for users to have access to a sit-to-stand assistive mechanism that, “gives them access to higher desks, counters or shelves on the premises. For people with mobility constraints, the adjustable-height feature…[allows] easy and intuitive sideways transfer to and from the scooter.”

Located just in front of the adjustable seat rest, users will find a footrest that hosts ample room for storing items that users bring with them on the go. The device’s wheels and footrest coverings are both made from the same Elesa+Ganter vulcanized rubber castors to ensure a smooth ride, even on uneven surfaces. Operable from a smartphone or from the device’s intuitive control panel, GoSolo meets users where they are to provide seamless transportation in controlled environments.

Putting it best in their own words, the team behind GoSolo explains the inspiration behind the smart universal mobility concept, “We have to rethink how we design products for a larger range of people including those with limited mobility or strength.”

“Beyond the usual mobility constraints, there are also circumstantial constraints like having too many bags, carrying infants, recovering from surgeries, pregnancy, menstrual cramps, or even fatigue. At some point in time, any of us can have mobility constraints. GoSolo addresses this need.”

GoSolo can glide across all types of flooring, from smooth marble to uneven wood.

The expandable seat rest allows users to adjust their height to meet acquaintances and tall surfaces like check-in desks at hotels.

The team behind GoSolo gave the device a minimalist look to maintain a universal appeal.

Users can even feel free to traverse incline ramps using GoSolo.

The post The expandable seat of this smart mobility device can be controlled from your smartphone  first appeared on Yanko Design.

What was that cryptic logo during Carl Pei’s Nothing phone (1) announcement? Here are our thoughts.

Like most people, I too was baffled to see that strange white-on-black pictogram when Carl teased the Nothing phone (1). Surely it meant something. Or did it mean ‘nothing’? Well, knowing the company’s ability and need to keep the hype train constantly moving, I’m sure that strange line-art wasn’t just randomly generated. Here are a few thoughts that immediately sprung to mind.

The most widely circulated interpretation of the symbol came from concept-designer Ben Geskin. Geskin’s design turned the C in the top left corner into a camera bump, and let the rest of the symbols naturally fall in line. This sort of opened up a few possibilities – firstly, of a wireless charging coil on the back (that’s what that main shape seems to be), although, along with the vertical line below that, it sort of looks like Apple’s MagSafe connector. Here’s what they look like side by side.

While I’m pretty sure Nothing can’t use the words MagSafe to announce such a feature (it would violate Apple’s trademarks), Carl did mention the fact that the phone was built to work seamlessly with products from other companies. Could the Nothing phone (1) have a magnetic connector on the back? Well, just the realist in me says that it’s highly unlikely, although the idea of having a wireless charging coil on the back that’s visible through a transparent facade sounds much more plausible.

Here’s a look at a render of the Nothing phone (1) concept kept right beside the Nothing ear (1). I have to admit that they do look like a part of the same product family!

What about those lines, though? Well, your guess is as good as mine, although the diagonal line on the top right, along with the letter C feels a lot like the prefix in Command Prompt. I’m clearly reading tea leaves at this point, but Pei did allude to the fact that the Nothing OS was going to be lightweight, powerful, flexible, and in black-and-white. Sounds an awful lot like Command Prompt to me from under my tin foil hat, but I’m obviously going off the deep end. At the same time, the vertical dot and dash at the bottom sort of looks like power and volume keys, don’t they?

Enough of weird speculation about the back; let’s move to the front of the device. While Geskin’s concept shows a hole-punch camera in the center, a fleeting glimpse of the Nothing OS preview made me think otherwise. Pei did mention that the clock and battery indicator would permanently sit on the top left and right corners, making it pretty clear that the Nothing phone (1) would either have a hole punch camera or a notch camera… or was he hinting at something different? When the Nothing OS preview shows the camera app opening, there’s a downward-facing arrow right where the hole punch camera would sit (refer to the image below). This leads me to believe that Nothing actually has something better in store as far as the front-facing camera goes, because why else would a digital element be in the UI if there was, in fact, a hole punch camera at that location?

The only thing we can conclusively say about the Nothing phone (1) is that it’s coming in summer and it’ll run Nothing OS. Maybe looking at the Android launcher (which debuts next month) will give us a clearer picture of what to expect. That being said, it’s fun to imagine what the phone can look like, and what it’s capable of. Even if we’re completely wrong in our predictions, Carl definitely got one thing right. He got us hyped about tech again…

The post What was that cryptic logo during Carl Pei’s Nothing phone (1) announcement? Here are our thoughts. first appeared on Yanko Design.

This smartphone’s secondary display means less-intrusive usage without missing important notifications

A cool matte finish phone with a small secondary display on the back panel to make you do more with less intrusion. This brings productivity to the focus and notifications from your phone to stay in the backdrop.

Talk about smartphone designs, and we’ve seen them all the last decade or so. Right from the clamshell designs and sliding ones to the current generation foldables and the evolving rollable screens. Smartphones like Xiaomi Mi 11 Ultra take a detour from the standard phone designs with a secondary small display on the back panel right by the side of the camera module setup. The Nubia Z20 phone with a big display on the rear is also a very brave move. Even the Meizu Pro 7 took a bold step with the vertical secondary screen below the camera module to offset the traditional phone market.

The SPhone by Sergey Popovich looks inspired by this niche smartphone design language with a utility that goes just beyond the display of important notifications. It’s all about creating a space for placing favorite widgets, especially with the possibilities of the Android 12 operating system which sets its focus on functionality and UI design to get more done with beautiful interface design aesthetics at the core. On top of that, the secondary screen on the rear comes in handy for making video calls with the primary lens which is always more potent than the on-screen camera.

Turning down the phone on its face does mean no distractions while you need to work, but missing important notifications or alerts could put the user at a disadvantage. This is where the secondary screen on the back comes into play to beam important notifications and keep the user informed, to either check them right away or delay them for later. Media player controls on the rear is also another undeniable advantage here. The fact that the screen is small means the battery will be preserved for longer as the main display won’t have to be opened every time notifications pop up!

Designer: Sergey Popovich

The post This smartphone’s secondary display means less-intrusive usage without missing important notifications first appeared on Yanko Design.

iPhone 16 Pro concept has so many changes it’s almost unrecognizable

What makes an iPhone an iPhone? Of course, only Apple can really tell, but there are a number of design cues that easily identify a phone as an iPhone, few of which remain in this concept.

We’ve seen our fair share of design concepts for future phones. Some base their ideas too closely on what is plausible, while others dare to go beyond what is possible. Concepts like these mix dreams and observations with a pinch of wishful thinking on top. Very few have actually hit the mark completely in predicting what will come to pass in a year or two, but one particular design looks both enamoring and alien that it leaves you wondering if Apple will even dare walk down this path.

Designer: Petar Trlajic

To be fair, this future iPhone concept is beautiful if you take it in isolation. It is almost all screen, without the notch that has been a stubborn presence on iPhones since the iPhone X in 2017. It still shows Apple’s typical materials, at least before it added wireless charging, like a metal finish on the iPhone’s back. Flat sides are also present, though with a bit more curve rather than the hard chamfered edges of current iPhones.

Things get a bit strange from there, though. One of the biggest and most striking differences is the camera design and location. Once upon a time, Apple did arrange cameras in a single row, but that was limited to just two sensors in a corner. This concept puts three cameras smack in the middle of the iPhone’s rear, something uncharacteristic for Apple, which will undoubtedly draw parallels to the Pixel 6’s “visor” design.

Even small details have changed as well, like the circular buttons that are more reminiscent of the older iPhones. There is also a reflective strip running around the edges that seem to be made of a different material than the rest of the iPhone’s body. It’s unlikely to be plastic, which rules it out as antenna lines. The punch-hole camera is also new, but there are already rumors that Apple will actually switch to this design this year or in 2023.

If not for the iconic Apple logo, few will probably identify this as an iPhone at first glance. That’s not to say Apple will never adopt this design, just that it probably won’t within the next two or three years. That’s probably why AppleDesign christened this concept as the iPhone 16 Pro, suggesting it is probably far into the future, if it even happens at all.

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OnePlus is allegedly toying with the idea of a smartphone with a single large rotating camera




Based off a patent from 2020 discovered by LetsGoDigital, OnePlus could possibly be working on a smartphone with a single primary lens that rotates independently, eliminating tilt while filming videos for more stabilized footage.

The details or the functionalities of such a camera remain unknown, although LetsGoDigital tapped into the talents of Technizo Concept to help render this idea to life. The results feel like a fusion of OnePlus’ later phones along with a camera that’s highly reminiscent of the Nokia Lumia 1020. The camera, according to the patent, isn’t like your pop-up camera, which featured on the OnePlus 7 Pro, but rather, uses a series of magnets to rotate in its place like a turntable. While the immediate benefits of such a shooting mode aren’t entirely apparent, it definitely goes a long way in eliminating jittery footage caused by the hands shaking while capturing videos. The rotating camera can keep the video 100% vertical or horizontal regardless of how you hold your phone (even if you switch orientations, the video still remains the way it was), and can even help effectively capture panoramas without any tilting. Combine this with the massive camera’s built-in image stabilization system and Hasselblad’s imaging tech and you’ve got a phone that packs an incredibly powerful shooter (along with what I can only assume is a large sensor to match) that gives you stellar images as well as shake-free videos.

A semi-detailed look at the camera system shows how massive the lens is in comparison with the ones seen on phones from the competition. Call it an ‘all eggs in one basket’ approach if you will, but the fact that OnePlus is even working on such a system shows their level of faith and commitment to the idea of an all-powerful single-lens camera. A larger sensor allows more light to pass into the camera too, making it easier to take ‘portrait blur’ shots, night-shots, and even high-speed photography. It’s worthwhile noting that the concept’s camera doesn’t pop in or out like a point-and-shoot. It stays just the way it is, with a camera bump that still feels respectably on the lower side.

While the concept certainly evokes a pretty strong reaction (you’re either going to be really intrigued by it or you’re going to hate it), let’s not forget that the concept is just that… a concept. Companies are always quick to patent technologies that they value as intellectual property, but it isn’t entirely necessary that every patented technology will make its way into a phone. The idea of a single-lens camera in the year 2022 seems decidedly bizarre (especially after OnePlus already announced the 10 Pro just this month with a multi-lens setup), but given the dizzying number of changes happening at OnePlus ever since their parent company Oppo decided to take over, it’s fair to imagine that the future for OnePlus isn’t going to be business as usual.

Designer: Technizo Concept & LetsGoDigital

Images via LetsGoDigital

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