This quaint wooden villa in the Vietnam countryside encourages a serene human-nature connection

Design practice APS Concept renovated the stunning resort space Villa of the Star, located in the Dalat pine forest, Vietnam. The house was built while focusing on three main factors – connectivity, locality, and sustainability. The unique residence merges perfectly with the forest surrounding it, building a serene human-nature connection. The structure is built using a variety of locally sourced materials, such as stone, pine wood, concrete, steel, and bricks.

Designer: APS Concept

Near the site, there is a low ‘taluy’ river bank, therefore a natural wall was built, to protect the house from landslides and heavy rains. The wall was built using stones, and helps to not affect the natural state. The home comprises of three main volume blocks, two roofed units, and a lower section that functions as the ground floor. The lower portion has been clad in tangled stone and supports the two roofed units. Both the pointed roof components have been built from natural wood – each in a different color.

The material that was selected by the design team for the home is ‘modified pine wood’. Modified pine wood is popular for its moisture resistance, mildew resistance, termite resistance, heat resistance, stability, durability, and environmental friendliness. What makes the building even more interesting, is the fact, that the natural wood used to build it differs in color. The tones of the wood range from light to dark, and have been utilized in different parts of the home. Massive glass windows provide surreal views of the surrounding forest scape and allow generous amounts of natural light to stream in through the day.

The common areas include the living room, and the kitchen, and they are segregated from the private areas through the use of concrete grinded floors. The indoors and outdoors are connected subtly via glass doors, which allow you to exit the home, and enter the outdoors in a flexible and open layout. The whole intention behind the design strategy of the Villa of the Star was to allow the residents and guests to get closer to nature. It was designed to provide an experience where people feel at one with nature while ensuring comfort, privacy, and safety.

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This all-black house with vertical steel slats in Barcelona is the definition of a modern family home

Black is a really strong and powerful color, that most of us often run away from! Especially when it comes to using it in our homes. However, when implemented correctly, black can radiate a very modern and minimal feel, creating an aesthetic that instantly leaves you feeling calm and balanced.  Spanish architecture Studio MDAMMM transformed a single-family home in Barcelona into a stunning all-black structure, with the home’s key-design elements shining bright. The original home was a simple structure marked by vertical faces built from exposed bricks of ochre tones, contrasted with grey tones. Studio MDAMMM renovated the dull building into a vision in monochromatic jet black.

Designer: Studio MDAMMM

Called the Black House, the form and the interiors of the home were left untouched. Instead, the studio focused on the volume of the home using a 180-degree design concept that works along four axes. The four axes are monochromatism, accents on the openings, verticality, and capillarity. The studio wanted to retain and preserve as much of the home’s original framework as they could. They only wanted to change the original color, and the material palettes of the home, since they were pretty out of style.

The entire facade was painted a stark black, to elevate the volume’s relationship with the surrounding greenery and vegetation, and to create a rather interesting contrast. The various openings of the home were fitted with angular sheet metal frames that protruded out of the structure. These protruding sections function as a double skin of the building. “The project seems nearly reduced to a graphic sign, monochrome and essential,” said project photographer, Filippo Poli.

The various sections were built in varying lengths and cadences, to create a sense of dynamism on the facade, and multiply it by integrating vertical planes into it. During the daytime, when the sun shines bright, the shadows produce dynamic displays of light, movement, and shade, according to the position of the sun. While, during the night, the home is illuminated by the lighting in the interiors, imparting it with an effervescent and magical glow. The home looks like a beacon of light in the dark.

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Top 10 cabins you need to visit for your next weekend getaway

If you’re looking for a stunning little cabin in the woods to get away to and simply relax, then you’ve reached the right place. Cabins are by far the best type of vacation I’ve come across. They’re a peaceful and tranquil option to abandon your urban life and woes, and simply unwind in nature. If you’re wondering where to head for your next cabin retreat, then you can refer to this collection of beautiful and super cozy cabins that we’ve gathered. They’re the perfect safe haven nestled in the midst of nature, providing you a break from your everyday hectic life. From an off-grid cabin in the Italian mountains that doubles up as a yoga retreat to an all-black cabin in the woods that support a slow-paced life – these mesmerizing and surreal cabins are the ultimate retreat, you’ve been searching for. Plan your next vacation in one of them!

1. The Forest House

Called the Forest House, this beautiful cabin in Bowen Island, British Colombia is designed by SM Studio. It is heavily inspired by SM Studio’s philosophy of building low-energy and sustainable homes – and they have achieved it by creating a bridge-like structure that connects the home foundations. The result is a design that does not impact the surroundings negatively while allowing the user to enjoy the serenity, peacefully.

Why is it noteworthy?

Designed by the Vancouver-based SM Studio, the Forest House is surrounded by Douglas firs, and elevated above the rocky landscape. To reduce the impact of the home on the forest floor, SM Studio designed it like a bridge connecting two massive outcrops, leaving the space below quite clear, and minimizing the need to create a foundation on the rocks.

What we like

  • Built while maintaining a serene relationship with the landscape around it
  • Supports a more slow-paced life
  • Causes minimum disturbance to the site

What we dislike

  • The home can accommodate only 3 people, hence it can be considered a small space for certain families

2. Cabin Anna

Located in the De Biesbosch National Park in the Netherlands is a modular cabin called the Cabin Anna. Designed by architectural designer Caspar Schols, this cabin is the latest iteration of the flatpack Cabin Anna, which created waves in 2016. Schols had built it as a prototype garden room for his mother, in their home in Eindhoven.

Why is it noteworthy?

The latest cabin in the De Biesbosch National Park is designed to be utilized as a small compact home. It features a ground floor, mezzanine sleeping areas, a kitchen, a bathroom, and an outdoor shower. “In wintertime, Anna’s insulated wooden shell keeps the warmth inside like a thick winter coat. In spring or autumn, the glass keeps the rain outside or lets the sun in to warm up the space,” said the architect.

What we like

  • All the sliders have been designed to be manually operated, to allow the residents to feel a sense of closeness with the surrounding environment

What we dislike

  • They don’t offer an electronic opening version of Anna

3. The Iwi Cabin

Designed to be an accordion-shaped shed, the Iwi Cabin is an innovative space-maximizing design that can be compressed and expanded. It provides city dwellers with a nifty solution to expand space in urban apartments and living spaces.

Why is it noteworthy?

When the Iwi Cabin is fully expanded, it unfolds and occupies almost 91 square feet, and when it is folded and compressed, it occupies only 26 square feet. The Iwi Cabin is super easy to operate since owners can push and pull the shed, owing to the wheel system that allows it to be swiftly and efficiently handled and stored away.

What we like

  • The exterior of the cabin is resistant to wind, rain, and sunshine
  • The interiors have been outfitted with cork and sheep’s wool to keep the residents warm during cold weather

What we dislike

  • There being only one door/window, it is the only source of ventilation in the cabin

4. Kjerringholmen

This is the Hvaler archipelago, a true island paradise in Norway where you will find the ‘Kjerringholmen’ cabin. With just 63 square meters in size, the plan/design of the cabin still showcases plenty of space to give a very spacious and airy effect.

Why is it noteworthy?

Kjerringholmen is proof “that large houses don’t necessarily mean more quality of life. In just 63 square meters, with smart planning, it still has plenty of usable space,” said the studio. Occupying 63 square meters, the cabin is supported by steel pillars and surrounded by a dusky rocky landscape.

What we like

  • Blends perfectly with the natural landscape
  • Designed extremely efficiently to support a smart way of living

What we dislike

  • Birds may not notice the home and could crash into it since it merges so perfectly with its surroundings

5. Cabins in Farouche Tremblant

Nestled within the Devil River’s Valley, with the Mont-Tremblant National Park in the backdrop is a series of A-frame buildings in the ‘Farouche Tremblant’ agrotourism site that includes a cafe, farm, and four rental micro-cabins. “The cabins, though minimal, are designed for visitors to comfortably experience the changing beauty of the site throughout all four seasons,” said Atelier l’Abri founding partner Nicolas Lapierre “The structures’ organization and proximity really bring in a more social and communal experience which is great.”

Why is it noteworthy?

Designed by the Canadian architecture studio Atelier l’Abri, the buildings are meant to “recede in the landscape”. The studio designed that function as a basecamp for visitors who want to visit Devil’s River and valley.

What we like

  •  Amped with outdoor decking and a glazed gable end which allows the visitors to enjoy stunning views of the surrounding natural landscape

What we dislike

  • The aesthetics of the cabins are a bit old-school

6. “3 Scenes of Homes”

The ‘3 Scenes of Homes’ is a conceptual design by Studio Supra-Simplicities that was created as a proposal for Buildner’s 2023 MicroHome Competition Edition. The micro-cabin is placed on a rapidly rotating display, allowing it to swiftly switch between three varied rooms or scenes of living.

Why is it noteworthy?

The micro cabin seamlessly integrates three spaces – for sleeping, dining, and washing. It rotates swiftly, utilizing the theatrical function of a stage, to bring the bedroom, dining area, and washroom into the limelight turn by turn. The structure, in turn, occupies a minimum footprint, eliminating the need for unnecessary circulation spaces, and providing the space with a flexible style of living.

What we like

  • It covers only a small amount of space on the site
  • Recycles rainwater for daily usage via its rooftop harvesting system

What we dislike

  • It’s not the best and most functional living situation realistically speaking

7. Bathhouse

Norwegian architecture studio Handegård Arkitektur designed Bathhouse, a bright red cabin on the seafront in Hankøsundet, Østfold. Inspired by the traditional Norwegian boathouse aesthetics, the cabin uses the red color exterior as an homage to the same. The cabin sits right at the waterfront and is elevated using stacks of granite. This design gives it an almost fairytale appeal, with the little red cabin looking like it’s almost floating in the air.

Why is it noteworthy?

The cabin was built for a client who lives near the coast and aims to be a ‘modern reinterpretation’ of traditional Norwegian boathouses. The studio used contemporary materials and techniques to create this lively-looking cabin since the client wanted a space that was both modern and traditional.

What we like

  • The cabin’s red-painted finish, tin roof, and thick granite stacks in the water give the impression of a traditional boathouse quite accurately
  • The cabin’s living area is covered by a second layer of timber planks, angled at 45 degrees, which aim to create a sense of privacy

What we dislike

  • The open panels in the living room may cause discomfort for those who would rather have an option in arranging the angle and the privacy of their windows

8. A House

Nestled in the beautiful wooded region of Lilla Kilskäret, an island of the Swedish archipelago near Stockholm is a minimalist Nordic cabin called ‘A House’. Designed by emerging Studio Nāv, the idyllic cabin was designed for a young couple as a cozy summer home to escape to during the warm season.

Why is it noteworthy?

‘A House’ beautifully captures minimalist Nordic architecture, and its picturesque surroundings help to create a space that is truly calming and peaceful. However, despite its pristine and awe-spiring location, building the home wasn’t simple child’s play. The site and local building regulations were quite challenging, and hence the home needed to occupy a tiny footprint, and perfectly blend in with its surroundings. In a quest to do so, the interiors of the home were made to be open, free-flowing, and extremely flexible.

What we like

  • The interiors are marked by a single open room, encapsulated in shrouds of glass, allowing the home to harmoniously merge with its surrounding landscape, and creating the sensation of being at one with it

What we dislike

  • The home may not be private enough with its 3 walls being made of glass

9. The Buck Mountain Cabin

Situated on Orcas Island, which is part of an archipelago called San Juan islands, is the Buck Mountain Cabin. The beautiful cedar-clad cabin was built by embracing the original site and its conditions, and by ensuring that minimal disturbance was caused to it. A steep grade and a narrow clearing created by a rock outcropping were a few of the challenges faced by the architects, but they encouraged the clients to focus on these features as they are unique to San Juan.

Why is it noteworthy?

The grassy basalt-rock outcroppings set within a Douglas fir and Pacific madrone forest were used to enhance and elevate the cabin. The east side of the 1527 square feet cabin is anchored to an outcrop, while the west side interestingly cantilevers over the entire site, almost 22 feet above the ground, and provides beautiful views of the surrounding landscape. The large trees around the site weren’t torn down which also ensured that the site was minimally disturbed. The addition of cantilevers and point-load wooden columns with small footings helped this cause as well.

What we like

  • Large protective overhangs and south-facing clearstory windows allow sunlight to generously stream in, especially during winter
  • A stunning patio floats over the site and can be accessed via a glass door
  • Ensures minimal disturbance is caused to the original site

What we dislike

  • The designers avoided precious or complicated materials and systems, taking away from the luxury element the interiors could have

10. The Hermitage Cabin

Positioned on the edge of a hill, surrounded by the Apennine Mountains, and overlooking the Trebbia Valley near Genoa, is a minimal off-grid cabin called the Hermitage Cabin. This beautiful wooden cabin was built for “contemplation and introspection”, and occupies only 12 square meters. It can function as a secluded little home or even a cozy yoga retreat!

Why is it noteworthy?

Italian architecture studio Llabb drew inspiration from Scandinavian cabins and Japanese teahouses while designing the Hermitage. The cabin is raised on four wooden and steel supports, which stand on a base of sandstone beds. It features an intriguing modular form created from Okoume marine plywood in Llabb’s carpentry workshop!

What we like

  • Inspired by Scandinavian cabins and Japanese teahouses
  • Creates a minimal impact on the land
  • Doubles up as a yoga retreat

What we dislike

  • Can be considered a small space for a yoga retreat

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This concrete floating home in Ho Chi Minh City is designed to mitigate the effects of flooding

Architecture studio SDA designed a concrete-frame home called the Floating House. Perched on the outskirts of Ho Chi Minh City, the Floating House has been raised above the ground, to protect the home against the effects of flooding. The home is located in the Thu Duc district, which faces flooding quite frequently due to a nearby river. By elevating the home one meter above the ground, the studio was able to mitigate the adverse impact of flooding.

Designer: Studio SDA

The home is marked by its exposed concrete framework, which provides protection to the house from the elements. About 70 percent of the home is filled with spaces that are quite open to the outside, through the integration of cantilevered balconies and a rooftop terrace. This creates a serene indoor-outdoor connection. The rest of the home is closed off to the outside with the help of wood-framed windows.

“We composed the house as three slabs floating above the ground. The gap between each floor creates a diversity of spaces indoors and outdoors. Each slab is extended toward the garden, cantilevering in multiple directions, and serves as a terrace or outdoor space, an eave for an opening, and a roof to cover an outdoor staircase,” explained Studio SDA. The home features three levels, which are connected via an external staircase that is sheltered overhead by overhanging floor plates. The interiors of the home are enclosed by folding glass doors with dark-wood frames. This enables the spaces to be deftly interconnected to the balconies. However, the bathroom is fully enclosed and private.

The lower level of the home includes the bedroom. The bedroom is linked to the kitchen, living room, and dining area on the upper floor by an internal spiral staircase. A rooftop terrace is placed atop the home, and it holds seating and outdoor cooking spaces. “In Vietnam, where everything is packed tightly together, including people and things, we believe it is essential to design outdoor spaces that serve as ‘blank spaces.  This house focuses on the active outdoor life in Vietnam, with a new frame and structural design to realize it,” the studio concluded.

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This concrete floating home in Ho Chi Minh City is designed to mitigate the effects of flooding

Architecture studio SDA designed a concrete-frame home called the Floating House. Perched on the outskirts of Ho Chi Minh City, the Floating House has been raised above the ground, to protect the home against the effects of flooding. The home is located in the Thu Duc district, which faces flooding quite frequently due to a nearby river. By elevating the home one meter above the ground, the studio was able to mitigate the adverse impact of flooding.

Designer: Studio SDA

The home is marked by its exposed concrete framework, which provides protection to the house from the elements. About 70 percent of the home is filled with spaces that are quite open to the outside, through the integration of cantilevered balconies and a rooftop terrace. This creates a serene indoor-outdoor connection. The rest of the home is closed off to the outside with the help of wood-framed windows.

“We composed the house as three slabs floating above the ground. The gap between each floor creates a diversity of spaces indoors and outdoors. Each slab is extended toward the garden, cantilevering in multiple directions, and serves as a terrace or outdoor space, an eave for an opening, and a roof to cover an outdoor staircase,” explained Studio SDA. The home features three levels, which are connected via an external staircase that is sheltered overhead by overhanging floor plates. The interiors of the home are enclosed by folding glass doors with dark-wood frames. This enables the spaces to be deftly interconnected to the balconies. However, the bathroom is fully enclosed and private.

The lower level of the home includes the bedroom. The bedroom is linked to the kitchen, living room, and dining area on the upper floor by an internal spiral staircase. A rooftop terrace is placed atop the home, and it holds seating and outdoor cooking spaces. “In Vietnam, where everything is packed tightly together, including people and things, we believe it is essential to design outdoor spaces that serve as ‘blank spaces.  This house focuses on the active outdoor life in Vietnam, with a new frame and structural design to realize it,” the studio concluded.

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Inflatable concrete water tank can help communities get clean water

If you live in a place where clean water is pretty much accessible, it’s probably something that you often take for granted. During times of crisis, it’s also one of the most overlooked needs but is pretty life-saving and life-changing. There are organizations that specifically help bring access to clean water to the families that have been displaced and affected by natural disasters and other calamities. The recent massive earthquake in Turkey and Syria has affected the lives of millions of people and we’re also seeing different technology and innovation that have come out to bring help to the countries and communities.

Designer: Deploy

A Turkish company is helping those whose access to clean water are still disrupted because of the earthquake. They have sent this unique thing called inflatable concrete tanks that are able to hold 3,698 gallons of clean water. They are made up of a patented material called “concrete canvas” that can be flat-packed for transport and then inflated when it reaches its destination. We rarely see the words inflatable and concrete used together so this is a unique kind of material that will be really useful for times when you need to store clean water for a long time.

Concrete canvas is a layer of cement that is put in between fabric and a PVC liner. It is flattened and can be transported through air to its eventual destination. There is a concrete base slab that will hold the structure and you need to use an air-pump to inflate it. There is also a hydrating process that will cause it to harden and it will take around 24 hours to make it solid enough to hold water. Upon inflation and hardening, it will turn into an eight-foot water tank that is also fireproof and waterproof.

The tank is meant to be low-maintenance, easy to clean, and self-repairing. You don’t need to spend a lot of manhours and other materials when installing it and maintaining it for however long it is needed. It can be a good tool to have for communities that may need to have storage for clean water and it actually has a lifespan of 20 years so hopefully, it will not take that long to get clean water back to the place.

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This portable Japanese store uses an easy-to-use DIY design to easily create minimal stores

As someone who has worked in retail occasionally, I sometimes think about stuff that would make our staff’s life easier. There are times when we have to join various events and trade fairs but our products are not that easy to transport and set up. Sometimes all we have is a table and a small shelf so the display doesn’t look that great. It would be nice to have a mobile shop that we could bring with us whenever we need to have a mini bookstore with us. This mobile store by a Japanese design studio is something that we could have used.

Designer: COC

SHOPKIT is a sort-of DIY furniture set that you can bring along with you as a mobile store or display booth. It is pretty easy to assemble and disassemble and is also pretty portable so you can bring it with you whenever you need something to display and sell your wares. The design is pretty minimalist and uses various materials like wood, steel, and polycarbonate so it will fit right in with wherever you’re setting up shop, whether it’s a park, an exhibition venue, at the mall, or any other urban spaces.

There are two types of SHOPKIT currently available. The single door type is made up of one box and is the easier one to assemble of course. If you want something bigger, there’s a double door type that is made up of two boxes that has work counters held in place with magnets and has a translucent facade so you can get a little bit of lighting as well. The module also has a place where you can hang a split shop curtain to protect you from the sun if you’re outdoors. It’s also something reminiscent of traditional Japanese shops so it fits with the aesthetic.

Originally, these units were just temporary structures as a building was being renovated. But they have now been repurposed as a piece of mobile architecture that is movable, portable, and easy to assemble and store. The model can be used by businesses and entrepreneurs that are in need of mobile shops and like the minimalist, Japanese design. It would be pretty useful for my past retail self who had to lug around tables, shelves, and books.

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This charred wood self-built tiny home executes all the dont’s of designing for a small space

This beautiful 16-foot-long tiny home in Byron Bay, Australia was designed and is home to a lovely couple Samara and James. Frank Macchia, a holistic designer, and Samara’s father helped them to design the home. All the design ideas and moves you wouldn’t execute in a small space were implemented in this tiny home. For example – its interior and exterior feature a dark theme, and there aren’t a lot of windows in the home. Despite these details, the house manages to have an air of spaciousness and balance to it, while retaining a harmonious connection with the site it is situated on!

Designer: Samara and James

The wood-clad home is inspired by Japanese design, especially by shou sugi ban, a method of charring wood to make it more fire and pest resistant. The home was designed similarly to Samara’s parents’ home which is also located on the property. So, a theme of consistency and continuity was maintained. The house includes three modules, consisting of a bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom. They can be moved and reconfigured if the home ever needs to be expanded in the future. The home’s noteworthy modular configuration creates space for little interstitial decks. The home is surrounded by potted plants and greenery, adding a chunk of green to the space.

You enter the home through a screened alcove, which creates a connection between the bathroom and kitchen. The kitchen includes a sink and an induction stovetop, as well as cabinets and open shelving. LED lighting strips have been placed underneath the cabinets. There’s also a handy wooden frame installed to store James’ DIY cold brew coffee tower. Once you exit the kitchen, you enter a cozy transitional space, which holds Samara’s closet. The closet is hidden beneath a skinny door.

You enter the bedroom by sliding open a door of wooden slats. A comfy bed, a small nook, and James’ closet occupy the space in the bedroom. A huge window in the room allows natural light to stream in. The window can be covered with a roller blind, which enables it to transform into a movie screen, with the help of a projector that is placed in James’ closet. The home also features a cool outdoor shower. A door separates the outdoor shower from the rest of the bathroom where the toilet and sink are located.

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These AI-generated self-contained living pods under city bridges bring an affordable solution to society problems

Homelessness is an ever-prevailing issue that only seems to be growing as time passes. Architect Shail Patel decided to create and harness a rather innovative and unique solution to address the complex social issue that is space shortage in an increasingly expensive world. He utilized the artificial intelligence design tool Midjourney to create a series of modular pods that are designed to help those in a tough situation find a space for the night or even become a permanent place they can count on.

Designer: Shail Patel

Shail’s plan is to bring to life and utilize urban spaces, particularly the areas under bridges, that are otherwise ignored and have been forgotten. He aims to make use of modular design to build a safe, clean, and respectful living space for the homeless population. He wants to transform these ignored urban spaces into decent and dignified homes for them. The plan is to build pods that function as self-contained living spaces which will provide citizens with a private and comfortable home throughout the year.

The pods will feature heating and cooling systems, ventilation, and natural light. In fact, they will even be built using eco-friendly materials. The pods have been imparted with a modular form to ensure easy construction and assembly. This allows the project to be quickly expanded as and when needed, providing homes to the needy in a swift and efficient manner. As mentioned earlier, the pods are built using sustainable materials, which gives them a lot of longevity, and they’re also supposed to be quite durable. They will be equipped with energy-efficient features such as rainwater harvesting and solar panels. Patel’s careful consideration and design of the bridge pods will definitely ensure that they have a small carbon footprint.

Given that this sector is highly unorganized, we hope that training and teaching is the method used to regulate this environment for the prolonged success of this project.

Since these pods are going to be placed in empty lots under bridges, which may not always be the safest, measures have been taken to ensure the safety of the residents. The sites will be equipped with state-of-the-art security systems. Staff such as social workers and healthcare professionals who can provide counseling, job training, and healthcare for rehabilitation will be assigned to the pod sites. Patel hopes that these pods will be introduced to cities and communities all over the world, providing an ingenious and innovative solution to the current cycle of poverty and space constraints in a rapidly changing world.

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Caspar Schols builds the latest iteration of the popular Cabin Anna in a Dutch national park

Located in the De Biesbosch National Park in the Netherlands is a modular cabin called the Cabin Anna. Designed by architectural designer Caspar Schols, this cabin is the latest iteration of the flatpack Cabin Anna, which created waves in 2016. Schols had built it as a prototype garden room for his mother, in their home in Eindhoven. This original cabin was immensely successful and was transformed into a series of commercially available flat-pack cabin structures.

Designer: Caspar Schols

The latest cabin in the De Biesbosch National Park is designed to be utilized as a small compact home. It features a ground floor, mezzanine sleeping areas, a kitchen, a bathroom, and an outdoor shower. “In wintertime, Anna’s insulated wooden shell keeps the warmth inside like a thick winter coat. In spring or autumn, the glass keeps the rain outside or lets the sun in to warm up the space,” he continued. “If it warms you up too much, you can either slide and close the wooden layer to block the warming sun or slide the glass layer open to let a cool wind enter,” said Schols.

The new Cabin Anna is a part of a series called the Anna Collection. The Anna Collection will include ten structures, whose construction, Schols will personally oversee and manage. All the sliders have been designed to be manually operated, to allow the residents to feel a sense of closeness with the surrounding environment. “We don’t offer an electronic opening version of Anna, using your own muscle power is essential. Your whole body is involved in opening up the whole cabin. Propelled by your body, the cabin prepares the brain to open up and connect to the natural environment,” Schols concluded.

The cabins are pretty versatile and can be used for multiple purposes. They can be utilized as compact homes, meditation spaces, or even artist’s studios. If you love Schol’s work, then you would also be excited to know, that he’s working on a project called ‘Anna One’. Anna One is a series of cabins that will hit the market in 2024. And what’s interesting is that users will be able to assemble and form the cabins themselves!

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