3D Printed Products designed to exhibit the endless possibilities of this simple yet groundbreaking technique!

3D Printing is gaining more momentum and popularity than ever! Designers and architects all over the world are now adopting 3D Printing for the creation of almost all types of products and structures. It’s a technique that is being widely utilized in product design, owing to its simple and innovative nature. But designers aren’t employing 3D printing only to create basic models, they’re utilizing this technique in mind-blowing ways as well! From 3D printed artificial coral reefs to a menacing two-wheeler design with 3D printed bodywork, the scope of this dependable technique is unlimited! Dive into this collection of humble yet groundbreaking 3D printed designs!

Hong Kong saw an 80% decline in the coral population in Double Island, Sai Kung, over the past decade and that drove the team to come up with a solution that would not only help that region but also the rest of the world that was blessed with corals. The team from Swire Institute of Marine Science (SWIMS) of the University of Hong Kong (HKU) and its Robotic Fabrication Lab of the faculty of architecture worked together to 3D print terra-cotta tiles that will act as artificial reefs. The result is a mesmerizing, organic swirl of line and negative space that reads like a burnt orange topographic map—and mimics the natural patterns of the coral itself. Why terra-cotta? It’s highly porous with “nice surface micro-texture” for marine organisms to latch on to, says team member Dave Baker, and an eco-friendly alternative to conventional materials such as cement or metal, the HKU team says.

Austria-based Vagabund Moto is one custom motorcycle shop that keeps pushing the envelope of design, materials, and processes. Their 15th build based around the BMW R nineT justifies the fact, as founders, Paul Brauchart and Philipp Rabl spray their creative magic over the two-wheeler for a facelift that’s so desirable for a speed junkie. The amount of metalwork is owed to craftsman Bernard Naumann! The client asked the team to make this the best ever two-wheeler they’ve ever worked on and the final result is called “Tin Man.” It has an extensive shell of bodywork highlighted by the monocoque tank cover and the seating configuration. It also has an underlying monocoque part that doubles as the under-seat storage. This is the most exciting bit of the bike is the 3D printed remote control that opens up the upper layer moving on hydraulic shocks. When open, the Motogadget dash is visible through the acrylic window in the cover.

Kairi Eguchi’s 3D-printed pen has a pretty unique way of balancing minimalism along with an expressive design. It’s rather simple if you break it down by its cross-section – The pen’s basically square-shaped, but it isn’t just a simple extruded square. Somewhere down the middle, the square profile makes a gradual 180° twist, creating a form that’s wonderful to look at and has a tactile appeal!

They look like wood, feel like it too. Hell, they even have those grain patterns that you associate with wood, but don’t let your eyes or fingers be fooled. This line of homeware designed by Yves Behar’s fuseproject isn’t made from actual wood. The technology you’re looking at lies within the domain of 3D printing, but it’s much more advanced than you’d think. Developed and pioneered by Forust, a subsidiary of Desktop Metal, this 3D printed material is a unique composite of recycled sawdust and bio-epoxy resin… but here’s where it gets interesting. Forust’s printers can actually print annular rings, knots, and grains into the printed wood. These details don’t exist on a surface level either. You can sand them and run a coat of polish over them and they’d look exactly like real wood.

The Art Deco movement of the late 19th century helped create new relationships between architecture and geometry. In a time that was certainly considered flourishing, just before the world wars, Art Deco beautifully combined European sensibilities with Eastern and South-American exotic styles while expressing itself through simple-yet-complex geometric forms and shapes… quite like Picasso’s Cubist art, but with arguably more attention to symmetry and composition. The Arintzea Collection from Muka Design Lab and Gantri pays tribute to Art Deco’s influences within Basque architecture, and it’s 3D printed!

If Adidas is to be believed, they might have created the most advanced running shoe of them all. The highly advanced shoe is deemed to give runners an all-new capability they’ve not experienced so far. They call it the 4DFWD sneaker – crafted using high-tech 3D printed performance technology. Working in close quarters with Carbon, the shoe results from 17 years of athlete-driven data and the Digital Light Synthesis technology coming together to create an advanced Adidas shoe unlike anything so far. According to Alberto Uncini Manganelli, SVP, and GM Adidas Running & Credibility Sports at Adidas, “We’re always looking to combine athlete insights with new and innovative technologies to create the best performance running products.”

The sleekness of the Apple TV remote wasn’t a feature, it was a flaw, and people were constantly complaining about losing their remote and never being able to find it… so when Apple redesigned their remote, many were expecting the 2 trillion-dollar company to address this problem too. However, all Apple managed to do was redesign the remote’s controls by bringing an iPod-style jog-dial on it. For the thousands of people who don’t see themselves buying a new remote just so that they can face the same old problems, Etsy-maker PrintSpired Designs has a neat workaround – a 3D printed case that not only gives the old Apple TV remote some volume and thickness but also allows you to slip an AirTag in so you can track your remote when it inevitably gets misplaced.

The Mickey Soap Dispenser Attachment isn’t an officially licensed product from Disney but is rather a clever fan-made product that retrofits onto most foaming handwash dispenser nozzles (although the designer recommends Bath and Body Works soap bottles). The attachment basically helps distribute the foamed handwash into three large blobs instead of one, making it resemble Mickey Mouse’s iconic circular head and ears (or Deadmau5, if you’re an electronic music aficionado). The 3D printed attachment is pretty simple to install and even simpler to use. It comes in three solid colors (that gold one looks rather nice), as well as two decorated variants that resemble Mickey and Minnie.

Say hello to the Mandalorian smart speaker holder for the 4th Generation Amazon Echo Dot. Inspired by the Star Wars spin-off series, the smart-speaker holder comes 3D printed by Etsy shop Slic3DArt, quite perfectly resembling the Mandalorian helmet. Place your spherical Amazon Echo Dot within its head cavity and you’ve officially got yourself a trophy-head worth showcasing on your mantelpiece or coffee table! The purpose of the Mandalorian smart-speaker holder is purely aesthetic. It doesn’t enhance the speaker’s functions but doesn’t impair them either (it does, however, block the light ring at the base).

Designing new and unique light fixtures is no easy feat though and the designers behind HorizON, a suspension lamp with an elliptical form designed and constructed in Italy’s glass-making capital, Murano, took it upon themselves to completely reimagine the future of lighting design. On the inspiration behind HorizON, the designers say, “HorizON lamp is based on the belief that the industry of the next years won’t only evolve through a constant, technological upgrade of products, but reconsider values such as uniqueness, hand-making, and even ‘imperfection.’” Through HorizON, the creators reconsider design values by transmuting classic, craftsman artistry with 21st-century technological capabilities. HorizON’s final product is comprised of two main parts: a glass bubble crafted through a tried-and-true glassmaking tradition that enwraps its 3D-printed, LED-filled centerpiece.

These 3D printed pods are sustainable personal offices that you can subscribe to just like Netflix!

Post the pandemic, all of us have realized the importance of having a dedicated space where we can focus on work without having to explain on our zoom calls what the noise in the background is. Meet the Denizen Architype pod – a smart, functional, personal office that supports your remote work life and also could double up as a creative escape! This prefabricated office is designed with everything you need for the perfect work day and you can set it up anywhere in the world if you have subscribed to it – it’s like Netflix but for a physical office space.

Denizen pods want to help reduce central office costs while adapting to the changes like remote work and flexible lifestyle. The 100 sqft pod is a modern solution with a small footprint that can help retain global talent, maximize productivity and reduce environmental impact that big corporate offices have. “It is ideally suited for high-volume production as a consumer product – more like an automobile or smartphone than a conventional building. Leveraging the latest in 3D printing, robotic fabrication, and technology integration, Denizen can mass-produce high-quality office units that are not only more desirable spaces to work than conventional offices, but also cheaper and faster to build,” says the team in their press release.

The modern tiny office is constructed from premium materials like sustainably harvested timber, 3D printed biopolymers, and durable metal cladding. The tech has been integrated in the pod to make your work from home life as easy as possible. The company hopes to partner with cities to help deploy pods in green spaces to build communities and upgrade neighborhoods so that those who don’t have a backyard big enough for the pod can still subscribe and take advantage of it. This will mean less space for cars, office parks, and parking lots; more space for people, culture, and nature in the city. Remote tech and architecture is a critical tool for eliminating the carbon impact of business flights and traditional office buildings.

“There is a major unmet need in the shift to flexible, remote, and hybrid work, and it’s going to take conventional real estate decades to catch up. Even prior to the pandemic, offices were expensive, distracting, and inconvenient. A better solution was needed. We’ve created a space so inspiring that it will change the way you want to work and live. And by offering it as a subscription service, we make it natural for employers to give their teams a professional, connected, and safe work environment,” says Nick Foley, CEO of Denizen.

The desk seamlessly blends within the large glass arch that has a switchable privacy glass made of two layers with liquid crystals in between – this is expensive so we wonder if it will be a feature available only for the higher end subscription models. It has audiophile-grade speakers and 40 Amp electrical service for the structure. Another question for the team would be the source of electricity since they are pushing for sustainability and reduction of carbon footprint. The Denizen pod is still at a conceptual stage but is an interesting way to decentralize offices as we know it!

Designer: Denizen

Minimalist 3D-printed pen comes with a literal ‘twist’ that acts as its eye-catching detail!

Kairi Eguchi’s 3D-printed pen has a pretty unique way of balancing minimalism along with an expressive design. It’s rather simple if you break it down by its cross-section – The pen’s basically square-shaped, but it isn’t just a simple extruded square. Somewhere down the middle, the square profile makes a gradual 180° twist, creating a form that’s wonderful to look at and has a tactile appeal!

Designer: Kairi Eguchi

The pens come with a rather rough stone-ish texture as a result of the sandstone FDM printing. This adds to the pen’s unique appearance and its tactile appeal. It looks like stone, but feels surprisingly light, while that rough surface is also great to grip. The twist in the pen’s design is right above where one would normally grip it, so it ideally rests in the web of your hand rather than being difficult to hold. The twisted surface also allows the pen to roll, which seems rather unusual for something that’s originally square-shaped.

Titled the Serpentina (for ‘serpentine’), the pen takes on a snake-like quality with its long, twisting, dynamic-looking body. The pen’s showcased in 3 colors, a concrete grey, charcoal black, and a rather unusual resin-like transparent yellow.

The Serpentina Pen is a Silver Winner of the Design For Asia Awards for the year 2020.

Can you 3D print wood? Yves Behar’s line of decor uses 3D printed wood that’s as good as the original

They look like wood, feel like it too. Hell, they even have those grain patterns that you associate with wood, but don’t let your eyes or fingers be fooled. This line of homeware designed by Yves Behar’s fuseproject isn’t made from actual wood.

The technology you’re looking at lies within the domain of 3D printing, but it’s much more advanced than you’d think. Developed and pioneered by Forust, a subsidiary of Desktop Metal, this 3D printed material is a unique composite of recycled sawdust and bio-epoxy resin… but here’s where it gets interesting. Forust’s printers can actually print annular rings, knots, and grains into the printed wood. These details don’t exist on a surface level either. You can sand them and run a coat of polish over them and they’d look exactly like real wood.

Forust aims at disrupting the furniture industry by creating a more sustainable alternative to cutting down trees for ‘valuable’ hardwood. Instead, their additive manufacturing techniques can replicate any wood using simply wood waste. The result looks and feels like wood, and has strength similar to wood too. It can be readily worked, fastened, and finished with conventional wood finishing methods… and I wouldn’t be surprised if, by some miracle, it smelled like wood too! Take a look at some of Forust’s samples below.

To help create realistic proofs-of-concept of their game-changing technology, Forust partnered with fuseproject. Led by Yves Behar, the design studio debuted Vine, a collection of bowls and vases that helped showcase Forust’s revolutionary printing breakthroughs. “Vine’s simple and pure forms embody the core capabilities of Forust’s printing systems in its ability to create elegant, one-of-a-kind products. The collection adds a naturalistic feel to any home and perfect for storing those easy-to-misplace items. Each can be presented on its own or layered with other pieces on a console, coffee table, or entryway table, with or without botanicals or other items”, mentioned fuseproject’s team. “Vine’s curving, organic form juxtaposes against its dense but lightweight wood and bioresin composition that exhibits the same functionality and structural durability as conventional wood.” The Vine collection is available on Forust’s online store, and you can even upload your own designs and get them fabricated in Forust’s faux wood.

Designer: fuseproject for Forust

3D printed Adidas 4DFWD sneakers with a new cushioning tech is set to redefine the sneaker industry!





If Adidas is to be believed, they might have created the most advanced running shoe of them all. The highly advanced shoe is deemed to give runners an all-new capability they’ve not experienced so far. They call it the 4DFWD sneaker – crafted using high-tech 3D printed performance technology. Working in close quarters with Carbon, the shoe results from 17 years of athlete-driven data and the Digital Light Synthesis technology coming together to create an advanced Adidas shoe unlike anything so far. According to Alberto Uncini Manganelli, SVP and GM Adidas Running & Credibility Sports at Adidas, “We’re always looking to combine athlete insights with new and innovative technologies to create the best performance running products.”

The redesigned 4D midsole crafted from 39 percent bio-based materials has the rare bowtie-lattice pattern. The lattice structure is one in a five million structure, resulting in a forward motion (three times more in testing results) from the runner’s vertical forces. This is the sheer dedication by Adidas and Carbon’s teams to achieve a final design that ensures a gliding sensation for runners. As Alberto Uncini added by saying, “This industry-first midsole innovation positions Adidas 4DFWD as our most advanced digitally printed running midsole yet and showcases the potential of 4d technology in turning physics and bio-mechanic studies into performance solutions.” The unique design also brings to the fore a reduced braking force (by 15 percent) and a 23 percent increase in cushioning for ultra-comfort. 4DFWD makes use of Primeknit upper made out of lightweight recycled polyester, which means a perfect fit for the runner. In keeping with the sustainable design aesthetics, the midsoles are made from 39 percent bio-based materials.

Adidas 4DFWD sneakers will initially drop in the Core Black/Solar Red option on the Adidas app. The revolutionary sneakers will cost around $236 via signup that’ll last till May 16 for Creators Club members. The registration will be followed by the Tokyo Collection up for pre-order on July 1, with the shoes becoming available from the August 12. The collection will be the main podium shoe for athletes in Tokyo Summer Olympics, making this the shoe of the season!

Designer: Adidas

A ferrofliud sound reactive visualization elevates this minimal Bluetooth speaker to a whole new level!





For an audiophile, adding on a visual experience to your music amplifies the joy – explaining why audio visualizers are so in demand. From the nostalgic visualizations of good old Windows Media Player or cult favorite Winamp – or the much recent phone music players like Poweramp or Media Monkey, being able to move to your favorite beats with a cool visualizer is fun multiplied. Taking the concept of a lava lamp and nerdifying it to a new dimension, Dakd Jung has created this other-worldly speaker, which blew me away – hey, I’m an audiophile, and this is right up my alley!

Bringing the idea of cool music visualizations to a custom speaker, the artist amazes netizens with his Ferrofluid display cell Bluetooth Speaker. Yes, this one uses ferrofluid – the same material initially developed by NASA engineers in the 1960s for pushing fuel into the rocket engines. It is a magnetic material (similar to what iron fillings look like) mixed with a liquid substance to keep the particles from sticking together. The result is a material that is fluid like liquid, but when the magnetic field is applied to it, the material acts as a black blob taking up different shapes depending on the amount and direction of magnetic field influence.

The result is a unique Bluetooth speaker made from 3D printed housing the speaker drivers, a small amplifier, and round glass containing eliminated by white LED lights. Dakd had to think his way around the material sticking to the glass problem, so he coated the inside of the glass with unique material. Depending on the audio frequency, the blob takes up different shapes – something you can’t take your eyes off. All I’ve got to say is – when it is finally available commercially – shut up and take my money!

Designer: Dakd Jung









This Miniature Xbox Series X Says “Hold My Drink.”

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Do you not like having your drink can sitting out on your desk? You could get toss your can in your desk drawer, or you could hide it inside of a miniature Xbox Series X. This tiny video game console looks just like the real deal, though it’s designed to hold a drink can instead of playing games. I suppose you could put a Raspberry Pi game system inside of it and use it to play games if you really wanted to.

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Etsy seller QTechV makes this 3D-printed mini-game system, complete with green LED lighting. It’s the right size for one of those 16 oz. energy drink cans, each of which provides enough caffeine to keep a gamer going for 18 minutes. So you’re gonna need to buy a bunch of these miniature Xboxes if you want to store a day’s worth of energy drinks.

This sleek table-lamp doubles up as a bedside tray for organizing all your belongings

Silvon, the science-backed startup known for elevating ordinary home goods introduces TRAY Table Light, a new lighting design created in partnership with Gantri to encourage better bedtime rituals.

Designed to help declutter your nightstand as well as help you de-clutter your mind, the TRAY light serves as an ambient lamp that also holds and organizes your bedside items like your spectacles, water bottle, phone, etc. It features an accordion-inspired lampshade that glows with a fluted/banded design, atop which sits an opaque tray that holds your belongings. At 9.25 x 9.25 inches, it fits comfortably on most bedside tables, and offers enough surface area for all your belongings. When the lamp’s switched on, your objects are cast in a diffused light that bounces around your room. Without creating any glare or appearing too bright, the TRAY Table Light lets you easily spot and access your belongings and even see clearly around your bedroom.

The TRAY Table Light comes as a collaborative effort between Silvon and Gantri. Like all of Gantri’s lamps, the TRAY is 3D printed out of the proprietary Gantri Plant Polymer (GPP) and treated with a matte finish. The inside of the lamp is fitted with a 6W LED bulb, and the TRAY also has a dimmer switch integrated into its TPE electrical cord.

The TRAY joins Gantri’s vast collection of minimally expressive designer-made lamps as perhaps the first ever lamp to also have a functional purpose. Place it on your bedside table and it transforms into an illuminating organizer. Or hook it to your mantelpiece to transform it into an ambient living-room light + keyring bowl!

Designer: Silvon for Gantri

3D printed product designs that exhibit the endless possibilities of this innovative technique!

Designers and architects all over the world are now adopting 3D Printing for the creation of almost all types of products and structures! It’s a technique that has gained a lot of momentum, owing to its simple and innovative nature. But designers aren’t employing 3D printing only to create basic models, they’re utilizing this technique in mind-blowing ways as well! From 3D printed artificial coral reefs to a menacing automotive design with 3D printed parts, the scope of this dependable technique is unlimited! In fact, did you know, lunar habitats for the moon are being 3D printed as well? There’s honestly nothing that cannot be 3D printed these days, the possibilities are endless, and we’re super excited to see what else is in store! For now, dive into this collection of humble yet groundbreaking 3D printed designs!

Hong Kong saw an 80% decline in the coral population in Double Island, Sai Kung, over the past decade and that drove the team to come up with a solution that would not only help that region but also the rest of the world that was blessed with corals. The team from Swire Institute of Marine Science (SWIMS) of the University of Hong Kong (HKU) and its Robotic Fabrication Lab of the faculty of architecture worked together to 3D print terra-cotta tiles that will act as artificial reefs. The result is a mesmerizing, organic swirl of line and negative space that reads like a burnt orange topographic map—and mimics the natural patterns of the coral itself. Why terra-cotta? It’s highly porous with “nice surface micro-texture” for marine organisms to latch on to, says team member Dave Baker, and an eco-friendly alternative to conventional materials such as cement or metal, the HKU team says.

The shape of the handy tool called MH-19 is inspired by protection masks and has solved yet another problem using design. Gloves are single-use items that generate more waste if used by everyone to do everyday things. Gloves can be left aside for the healthcare professionals who need them the most while we can use reusable handles like this for our daily essential outdoor tasks. Innovation has the power to be simple yet mighty effective in its purpose. 3D printers are currently a valuable tool in this fight and the global design community is doing everything they can to support the healthcare professionals, engineers as well as the general public through their creativity.

The 2029 e-bike brings art-deco and automotive design into the future, with its unusual combination of clean-cut geometric shapes brought about by sheet-metal fabrication, along with bone-inspired generative-design details 3D printed in metal. The bike is an amalgamation of styles that pays a hat-tip to the revolutionary design of the 1929 Majestic, built by George Roy. Ninety years later, Bryan Fuller and his team at Fuller Moto decided to push boundaries with bike design. Created as a commissioned piece for the Haas Moto Museum and Sculpture Gallery, the bike incorporates design trends and technologies that are indicative of the future of automotive design. The stunning 2029 comes with an electric drivetrain, fully enclosed aluminum body, hub-centric steering, transparent PolyCarbonate wheels, and 3D printed bike parts, furnished out of Titanium.

NIVEA’s parent company is German giant Beiersdorf and they are on a mission to reduce packaging waste by minimizing and closing their material cycles. And for NIVEA that meant launching a shower gel refill station! Now it is a good first step and has its pros but also has some cons. The biggest con is that shower gels themselves are not good for the environment and there is no way to know how many bottles actually get rinsed clean before they are recycled – otherwise, it doesn’t work. Shower gels also need a lot of water to be made, and as climate change makes the world hotter/drier, the water crisis is already a big issue in many countries. A solution to that? Bar soaps! NIVEA makes those too, they use less water and can be packaged in the recycled paper – that is the real solution but if this refill station reduces some plastic waste and sparks a movement for the brand to take bigger steps, then we are here to see it. The prototype is going to be tested in select locations where the brand will gather data on how consumers are interacting, feeling, reacting to the concept of reusable bottles. The prototype machine was made with their in-house 3D printersNIVEA hopes that with this refill station they will make it convenient for consumers to reuse containers and reduce plastic usage.

Say hello to Timor, Sargasso, and Celebes, three members of John’s Coral Lighting Collection. Inspired by different styles of corals, the lamps come with varying aesthetics that reflect the visual characteristics of each coral type. The way John went about creating these unique lights was to first develop the computational design algorithms that mimic growth patterns found in nature. “The lighting collection is my way of paying tribute to the beauty of the ocean. As a veteran surfer, I’ve experienced the power and beauty of the ocean while enjoying each wave as its own unique moment in time. One of many magical living structures in our great oceans is coral. With a diverse range of colors, shapes, and scales, coral is an entire ecosystem of thriving life. My lighting celebrates this life”, says Mauriello.

What we really need is for everyone to wear face-masks that prevent the transmission of germs. What we DON’T need is for those face-masks to make it harder for us to breathe, right? As you inhale, most flimsy fabric masks collapse inwards because of the negative air pressure created inside the mask… it’s honestly something most people can deal with, but if you’re someone with pre-existing respiratory difficulties, it could make regular breathing rather difficult. The Cannula mask avoids this problem with its reinforcing endoskeleton. A thin plastic grille, this skeleton gives the mask its defining structure, preventing it from pressing against your face the same way a hanger prevents clothes from getting crushed by retaining its shape. Designed to be worn by people with respiratory difficulties, the endoskeleton even comes with a hollow spine that allows you to plug a nasal cannula into it, letting you direct fresh oxygen right to the wearer’s nose; effectively allowing them to inhale and exhale freely without worrying about a flimsy mask smothering them every time they try to breathe.

A lot of moments in rock history are defined by the iconic guitar-smash… and while I personally don’t think it’s particularly nice to smash musical equipment, what if you designed a guitar that, if you look at the image immediately below, couldn’t be smashed? That’s what Sandvik decided to do. Designed to show off their advanced titanium additive printing techniques (and also their engineering prowess), they designed the world’s first guitar that can’t be smashed. Literally. Many have even tried, including rockstar Yngwie Malmsteen, who managed to wreck his stage amps and monitors but couldn’t get the guitar to even as much as deform. Sandvik partnered with guitar-designer Andy Holt over what sounds like a pretty unusual design brief… Designing an electric guitar that was virtually indestructible, but also sounded incredibly good. The design process included hours of analyzing footage of guitars being smashed (many by Malmsteen himself) to analyze the biggest points of weaknesses.

The TWS earphones’ unique shape comes with a specially designed 3D acoustic chamber that helps make the audio sound richer, with better, more distinct basslines… while also helping reduce sound distortion as well as providing organic noise isolation of up to -35 db, allowing it to rival the Airpods Pro’s active noise cancellation tech just through its ergonomic design. The amount of careful consideration built into the Lytte HarmoniQ is truly remarkable. Each earphone casing is meticulously 3D printed using DLP printing tech (a feature that allows it to have that unique acoustic chamber shape) and hand-polished to look as remarkable as it does. Just like most smart earphones, the Lytte HarmoniQ supports iOS as well as Android integration, with the ability to tap, double-tap, and long-press to control music playback as well as smartphone functions (including summoning the phone’s voice AI).

Harvesting abundant sources of renewable energy and then converting them into something valuable has been the quest humankind has been on for decades. This makes even more sense in current times when we are on the brink of exhausting earth’s vital resources, causing unrepairable harm to the planet. As scouts of this very quest, the team at Georgia Tech’s ATHENA lab has created a 3D-printed energy harvesting antenna that’s capable of garnering electromagnetic energy of the 5G signals to juice modern-day gadgets. The technology is literally about putting the overcapacity 5G network bandwidth to judicious use – turning it into a wireless power grid that could shape the future of our relentless energy requirements for IoT devices or mobile devices. They’ve created a flexible Rotman lens-based rectifying antenna (rectenna) that can collect the millimeter-wave in the 28-GHz band – the first of its kind. Previously there have been attempts to harvest the 24 or 35 GHz frequencies, but they were not practical since they only worked when they are in sight of the 5G base station.

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Does your company’s conference room need a little inspiration? This far-out office furniture is designed to liven up your workspace. It’s entirely 3D-printed which results in smooth transitions and curves throughout. With its three-dimensional Voronoi pattern, it sports an organic, liquid-like shape that’s sure to be a conversation starter and something to get your team’s wheels turning.

This credit-card sized antenna harvests energy from 5G signals into wireless power for IoT devices!





Harvesting abundant sources of renewable energy and then converting them into something valuable has been the quest humankind has been on for decades. This makes even more sense in current times when we are on the brink of exhausting earth’s vital resources, causing unrepairable harm to the planet. As scouts of this very quest, the team at Georgia Tech’s ATHENA lab has created a 3D-printed energy harvesting antenna that’s capable of garnering electromagnetic energy of the 5G signals to juice modern-day gadgets. The technology is literally about putting the overcapacity 5G network bandwidth to judicious use – turning it into a wireless power grid that could shape the future of our relentless energy requirements for IoT devices or mobile devices.

They’ve created a flexible Rotman lens-based rectifying antenna (rectenna) that can collect the millimeter-wave in the 28-GHz band – the first of its kind. Previously there have been attempts to harvest the 24 or 35 GHz frequencies, but they were not practical since they only worked when they are in sight of the 5G base station. Emmanouil Tentzeris, Professor in Flexible Electronics in Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, rightly summed it up by saying, “The fact is, 5G is going to be everywhere, especially in urban areas. You can replace millions, or tens of millions, of batteries of wireless sensors, especially for smart city and smart agricultural applications.”

This one is by far the most potent wireless power grid capable of powering devices at acute range – much better than any existing technology aimed at doing so. The credit card-sized iteration of the technology has a spiky plate around the center, which assimilates the 5G network’s millimeter waves. Just to compare, the rectenna design antenna developed by the team is almost 21 times more capable of sucking power from any direction – making it a viable bendable energy harvesting system capable of being employed in future technology implementations for the end-user.

It could be anything from an energy harvesting phone case, a credit card in your wallet that could charge your smartwatch at the end of the day, or a deck of cards that does more than its core intended purpose. For now, however, the innovation is only capable of powering low-energy IoT devices like sensors on your thermostat, but still, it the first step in the limitless possibilities that it promises.

Designer: Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology