Here are the hottest winning-designs from the A’ Design Award 2019

What makes the A’ Design Award stand out from others is its mission statement. It wants to find a common link between great design ACROSS all disciplines, and is committed to being a consortium or a common-ground for all sorts of good design. The A’ Design Award and Competition is more than just an awards program. It actively seeks good design, markets it, brings value to the project as well as the designer in the form of a wide range of value added services like a dedicated PR Campaign, a Gala Night with the world’s biggest design patrons and designers alike, a proof-of-creation document for your work, and even a platform to sell your design on.

The A’ Design Award’s perks aren’t just limited to winning designs, but also to participants. Your participation entitles you to a proof-of-creation document, inclusion in A’ Design’s Business Network, and the Design Fee Calculator service that lets you accurately price your design services for clients.

Judged by a grand jury of 209 elite designers and educators, here are a select few of A’ Design Award and Competition 2019’s winners. We’ve hand-picked some of our favorites from this year’s list of winners spanning categories such as Product Design, Lighting Design, Architecture, Furniture, Medical, and Social Design. Scroll down below to have a look at what’s making the waves this year in the design circuit! And don’t forget to register below to participate in the Competition next year to make the most of the opportunities that the A’ Design Award promises!

Grab an Early-bird Registration for A’ Design Awards 2020 by clicking here!

YD Handpicks: Winning Designs from A’ Design Awards 2018-19

01. RoType Flexible Keyboard by Royole

The RoType is a neat, rollable keyboard. Unlike those hideous flexible silicone/TPU keyboards that you now find on novelty gadget shops, the RoType is slick, professional, and classy. With a miraculously transparent keyboard that embraces and becomes the surface you place it on, the RoType feels sort of like typing on air. The keyboard uses a special film which contains a hidden circuit. With a transparency of 92%, and a thickness of a dazzling 0.04mm, the RoType flexes, stretches and curls multiple times without deformation. The flexible hidden circuit allows you to type by simply touching the keys, giving it an incredibly feathery UX… and when not in use, rolls right back into the RoType’s robust metal case, which is practically 1/10th the size of a regular keyboard!

02. Hexa Passenger Drone by Maform Design

We’ve all secretly waited for drones to be powerful enough to lift humans, haven’t we? While VTOLs are still somewhere in the near future, the Hexa passenger drone is a pretty plausible concept that demonstrates how a drone that lifts a human could look. With 18 propellers arranged in two circles (12 outside, 6 inside), the Hexa has a flight time of around half an hour. Where would one be able to travel in that much time? Maform Design thinks the Hexa isn’t a transportation device but an experience device. Designed to give you the experience of piloting a vertical take-off and landing vehicle, Hexa’s all about allowing riders to experience the thrill and adrenaline of drone flight! Maybe with advancing battery technologies we’ll see the Hexa turning into a proper short-distance transport solution!

03. Right Angle Screwdriver by Qian Xiaowei and Ye Xinmin

Designed for portability, and to get into those tough-to-reach spots, the Right Angle Screwdriver is a neat multi-tool with interchangeable heads and the ability to maneuver itself into difficult spots thanks to its novel design that allows the screwdriver to bend 90°. The miter-joint not only lets you reach screws in recessed places, but the 90° bend even gives you the power to unscrew or screw with much more torque. The size of a pen, the Right Angle Screwdriver is an ideal piece of EDC for the tinkerer, and its multiple heads just extend the product’s versatility!

04. The Barisieur by Josh Renouf

The Barisieur is a concept that’s definitely garnered its deserving share of interest. Featured on YD as a conceptual one-of-a-kind product years ago, the Barisieur has developed a lot over time, becoming the award-winning product it is today. What is it? Basically the best alarm clock ever made, because rather than jolting you out of sleep with an alarming noise, it gently and effectively awakens your senses by brewing you a fine cup of coffee! The alarm is hooked to a water heater which transfers the water to a pour-over coffee filter that decants your brew as you awake to the aroma of coffee. Paired with a small vessel of milk on the side (and a tray for storing your sugar), the Barisieur proposes perhaps the most effective way to get you out of bed. With a hot cuppa!

05. Twig Dumbbells by Ji Hoon Lee

When you think about it, a twig-shaped dumbbell is rather ironic, right? The word twig is often used to describe skinny or scrawny arms or legs, while on the other hand dumbbells, well, they help bulk up arms. The Twig dumbbells are an innovative dumbbell design by Ji Hoon Lee. With a handle and three prongs on each side, the weight of these dumbbells can be changed simply by switching the prongs.
The prongs or branches of the Twig are individual weights. Different prongs come with different weights and you can simply switch them to make each individual Twig heavier or lighter… although they’re sure to always look visually light, thanks to their twig-like form. Wait! That’s probably the idea! To get you to psychologically lift more by fooling your eyes into thinking you’re lifting tiny, weightless branches! Pretty clever!

06. Sidekick Notebook by Tan Mavitan

The Sidekick is quirky, but has logic to it. An A5 notebook looks small on your desk, but open it and it doubles in size, becoming an A4, and occupying precious real estate on your desk. The Sidekick has no such problem. Its unusual shape and diagonal spine allows it to open into an ‘L’ shaped notebook that can easily sit at the corner of your keyboard, or your mousepad, or even tablet. The notebook won’t serve well for sketching, but makes a good note-taking pad, offering both landscape and portrait writing areas. Take notes, make doodles, or probably even sketch on it if you can, the Sidekick is that one notebook you won’t buy and put away only because you’ll love keeping it on your table to occasionally take notes, and to perpetually show off.

07. Tsutsumu Card Holder by Hirotaka Satoh

It’s incredible what one can achieve out of a single piece of leather. The Tsutumu card holder is made from a stamped piece of leather. That’s literally the only production process it went through (aside from the branding being stamped into it too). No glue, no stitches, no rivets. Just pure leather. Basing itself on the Japanese culture of wrapping valued items carefully (google Furoshiki), the Tsutumu comes flat-packed and can easily be folded into shape. Its design ensures it holds its shape while holding cards within it too!
Elegant, simple, stylish, and differently vibrant, the Tsutumu cases wrap around your cards in a way that looks beautiful and unusual. The leather ages with time, gathering a beautiful patina, but the case itself lives on for years and years!

08. Kurio Modular Shelfing System by Markus Hofko

Designed like a breadboard that you plug electrical elements into, the Kurio Modular Shelfing System comes with a universal base-platform that you plug planes into, to make shelves. Based on the size and quantity of items you want to keep on your shelf, you can build any layout you choose by simply plugging pieces together. Made from aluminum, the Kurio doesn’t use additional fixtures like screws or glue, just good old mechanical joineries that allow the planes to be pulled apart and rearranged whenever you choose!

09. Symphony Number 7 Chair by Chen Ting-Hsiang

Similar in spirit to the Butterfly Chair by Eduardo Garcia Campos, the Symphony 7 Chair is inspired by the softness and sweetness of the 7th Symphony by Beethoven. The rocking chair is made from a pipe frame, and comes with leather cushioning, combining comfort, strength, and an incredibly organic skeletal design that makes for a great silhouette. The chair looks even beautiful when paired together with another of its kind, creating a beautiful symmetry!

10. Grid Table by Mian Wei

Made entirely of interlocking wooden pieces, the Grid Table takes inspiration from Chinese wooden structures called Dougongs (Dou Gong). Dougong is essential to the timber frame structure of traditional Chinese building, as it binds the roof, girders and pillars together to distribute weight evenly. The Grid table brings that approach to table-design, with its top-heavy-yet-stable construction that does a great job of distributing the table’s weight, while also turning the Dougong construction technique into an artform, with its wonderful, Jenga-esque geometric aesthetic!

Grab an Early-bird Registration for A’ Design Awards 2020 by clicking here!

A hanging storage that becomes the centerpiece of your family gatherings

Goccia is an elegant container that forms a reference point within the heart of the home; advancing technology has left families becoming disconnect from one another, only to reunite in silence around a TV. Goccia aims to reconnect families by providing a place for gathering that’s away from the distraction of technology. Crafted out of clay, the beautifully organic yet incredibly precise form evokes a feeling of calmness and tranquillity, this is only emphasized by the gentle, warm glow of the LED light that sits within it.

Due to the tear-like form being constructed from a ceramic material, it is suitable for use both within and outside of the home, meaning that the reference point for meeting can be varied, to keep it fresh and alive!

The Goccia is a winner of the A’ Design Award for the year 2019.

Designer: Giuliano Ricciardi of d-Lab studio

These Twig-shaped Dumbbells will bulk you up!

When you think about it, a twig-shaped dumbbell is rather ironic, right? The word twig is often used to describe skinny or scrawny arms or legs, and dumbbells, well, they help bulk up arms. The Twig dumbbells are an innovative dumbbell design by Ji Hoon Lee. With a handle and three prongs on each side, the weight of these dumbbells can be changed simply by switching the prongs.

The prongs or branches of the Twig are individual weights. Different prongs come with different weights and you can simply switch them to make each individual Twig heavier or lighter… although they’re sure to always look visually light, thanks to their twig-like form. Wait! That’s probably the idea! To get you to psychologically lift more by fooling your eyes into thinking you’re lifting tiny, weightless branches! Pretty clever!

The Twig Dumbbell is a winner of the A’ Design Award for the year 2019.

Designer: Ji Hoon Lee

A modular shelving unit that requires no screws!

Each person’s home is individual to them. So, what they require from the furniture within it is also unique, yet we make-do with generic ‘off-the-shelf’ units and work around their flaws. But what if this was reversed? What if the shelving changed to suit our everchanging needs? Well, that’s exactly what Kurio was designed to do, as it offers a beautifully simple, modular shelving solution!

Targeted for use by individuals in modern and sophisticated dwellings, Kurio is a decorative piece of wall-art that caters to the individual’s needs; the thin aluminum panels interconnect when placed within the vertical and horizontal slots. What makes this so appealing and clean is the absence of screws and fixtures, allowing for the configuration to be adjusted on the fly!

Not only does Kurio carry an element of functionally, but it also acts as a striking piece of wall-art that introduces a pop of color into the room!

The Kurio is a winner of the A’ Design Award for the year 2019.

Designer: Markus Hofko of Von Morgen

“The basic idea is inspired by the Cabinets Of Curiosities (hence the name Kurio) of the late renaissance. These wooden cabinets were shelfing systems with various boxes of different sizes, to hold objects of wonder from all around the world and juxtapose them in intriguing arrangements. These and similar concepts of showcases of the 70s and 80s were fixed in their design. Kurio in comparison is a modular system and can be changed and re-arranged with ease,” said Markus Hofko.

Royole’s rollable keyboard design is even more flexible than its tablet!

Royole seems to be truly championing the flexible, foldable future. After the Flexpai, arguably the world’s first folding tablet, the California based startup is looking to embrace folding tech… especially with the RoType.

The RoType is a neat, rollable keyboard. Unlike those hideous flexible silicone/TPU keyboards that you now find on novelty gadget shops, the RoType is slick, professional, and classy. With a miraculously transparent keyboard that embraces and becomes the surface you place it on, the RoType feels sort of like typing on air.

The keyboard uses a special film which contains a hidden circuit. With a transparency of 92%, and a thickness of a dazzling 0.04mm, the RoType flexes, stretches and curls multiple times without deformation. The flexible hidden circuit allows you to type by simply touching the keys, giving it an incredibly feathery UX… and when not in use, rolls right back into the RoType’s robust metal case.

All of the RoType’s critical hardware lies in its metallic case. The case, other than encasing the flexible keyboard when rolled up, houses all the important electronics, and connects wirelessly to any device to allow you to type with ease. The RoType comes with a complete, full-length keyboard that even packs function keys on the top, and doesn’t compromise on key-size… so you’ve got a perfectly capable and feature-laden keyboard in a form-factor that’s 1/10th the size of a physical keyboard. That’s pretty impressive if you ask me!

The Royole RoType is a winner of the A’ Design Award for the year 2019.

Designer: Royole

Kitchen hoods on the hob!

We are very used to seeing the kitchen hoods being placed right above the cooking hob, given that hot air rises… and easier for the hood to flush it out of the kitchen. The Supreme Worktop Range Hood is designed to be flushed on the countertop – right in-between the cooking hobs. The countertop hood is space-saving and pulls in air from the cooking utensils and sucks it out of the room, in a jiffy. The air extraction cone is high performance and is only 18 cm deep. According to the designers, “Supreme offers A++ Energy class and 620 m3/h flow rate.”

While I really like the design and idea of integrating the hood into the cooking hob, my only concern is the accidental spills of gravy or boiling pasta water! Hopefully it can withstand such spills.

The Supreme Worktop Range Hood is a winner of the A’ Design Award for the year 2019.

Designers: Engin Akbaba & Kaan Semih Savk for Silverline

Supreme is a hybrid product that combines air extraction with the induction hob, so all the components of the product are designed to provide the comfort of the end-user.

The motor component is placed to the inner panel of the countertop, which provides ease of assembly, so the height of induction hob is lowered to 18cm. This thinness offers usable space for the drawers of the countertop. Additionally, the separated motor unit has a water draining unit, which provides easy evacuate. Induction cooking technology provides a high level of safety.

All of the control panels are on the seamless surface of the hob. The functions like bridge cooking, which two cooking zones can be merged for bigger pots and pans improve the flexibility of cooking experience.

The separated air extraction motor unit has a water draining unit, which provides easy evacuate. Inside of the air extraction cone can be cleaned easily and the components like the air-extraction grill or the carbon filter can be easily removed, washed in the dishwasher.

The Shell sofa explores volume without weight, and is perfect for humans and cats!

With a voluminous yet hollow frame, the Shell sofa is instantly visible. It is, in a strictly physical sense, minimalist (because it’s mainly hollow), but visually, the Shell sofa is almost pillowy, spacious, and a treat to look at. The sofa is a frame that curves from the left to the back and to the right, with space in between for cushions, or even two side tables if you remove the cushions at the extreme ends. It’s visually imposing, but still manages to look light and airy, thanks to its wickerwork of metal rods. The interwoven rods also create this moire effect that creates a dynamic optical illusion, making the Shell sofa’s body incredibly interesting to look at… and while we’re on the subject of interesting, the sofa comes with two small openings at the beginning and end of its structure, making it perhaps the most entertaining play area for a domestic cat. Good luck getting it out though once it goes inside!

The Shell Sofa is a winner of the A’ Design Award for the year 2019.

Designer: Natalia Komarova

Your Furniture Design Moodboard: Winning Furniture Projects from A’ Design 2018

The purpose of this post is twofold. Not only is it a roundup of ten award-winning works that are worthy of your design inspiration mood board (go ahead and bookmark the page for use later!), it’s also a reminder that this is the last call for entries for the A’ Design Award and Competition, a competition that covers almost all categories of design. Furniture consistently ranks in the top 3 of A’ Design’s award categories, and we’ve pulled 10 noteworthy design from a hefty bunch.

We look at the top Furniture Designs from last year, creating a compilation of what A’ Design’s stellar 211-member international jury panel is worthy of winning the A’ Design Award. While we’re at it, do check out what winning an Award does for your Design Career, and don’t forget to head down to the A’ Design Award and Competition page to register to submit your design entries for the Award. The last date of submission is the 28th of February 2019, and the awards will be announced here on YD on the 15th of April!

LAST CALL! Register to participate in the A’ Design Awards now! Deadline: 28th February!

A’ Design Award 2018 Furniture Moodboard
01. Cocoon Lounge Chair by Timmy Kwok
Sitting on the Cocoon is a strangely comforting yet new experience. It looks a little revolutionary, no doubt… but sitting on it gives you an experience that’s difficult to actualize in words. Rest your body against it, and it feels like a hammock, with its woven fabric. However, it doesn’t consume you, like a hammock would. Lie down in a hammock, and the fabric gives in to the shape of your body… lie in the Cocoon, and it feels like you’ve still got some lumbar support. It feels more like a recliner than a hammock. And then there’s experience number three. Designed with a curved frame, the Cocoon swings to and fro, unlike a hammock that swings side by side. The Cocoon somehow manages to combine rocking, lounging, and relaxing all into one beautiful seating device perfect for a lazy afternoon with a cup of hot cocoa.

02. Renaissance Armchair by Zaria Ishkildina
Playing beautifully with a visual illusion called Moire, the Renaissance Chair styles itself on the form of the curule chair, an Ancient Roman chair design that was reserved for the highest of dignitaries, and was often a symbol of status and power. Designer Zaria Ishkildina took the chair’s form, altering the material from wood to multiple stainless steel tubes welded together. The result, although is a wireframe, feels less like one, and more like a modern, minimal (in terms of material choice, rather than abundance) throne.

03. Exo Chair by Svilen Gamolov
The Exo Chair’s memorable postmodern-esque design is quite worthy of being on the mood board because it looks completely unique from the top, front, and side. Designed to look like a rectangle from the front, an intersecting square and circle from the top, and a relatively abstract shape from the side, the Exo’s experimental design immediately looks eye-catching and inviting.

04. Petalis Sound Amplifier by Ismail Gunes Otken
The Petalis is a decorative element with an unusual function. Formed out of thick aluminum sheets, the flower-inspired Petalis works like an acoustic mirror, directing sound-waves to a user, or to a specific area. Televisions or speakers with 360° sound are often at a disadvantage when placed near or mounted on a wall. The Petalis helps guide the sound being thrown towards the sides, curving the sound-waves (much like the cone of a trumpet or gramophone) and helping amplify it by focusing the waves rather than letting them scatter. The Petalis comprises multiple individual ‘petals’ that can be wall-mounted in any way that works for you, both aesthetically and acoustically.

05. Joseph Felt Chair by Windels Lothar
The Joseph Felt chair, interestingly, is made from a single sandwiched sheet/ply of felt and foam. Folded in its clumsy, crumply style, the sheet (although pretty thick) turns into a 3D form, forming an armchair complete with a backrest and two armrests. The entire chair is held together by three well-positioned rivets, and is highly reminiscent of a chair sketch by Nick Baker!

06. The Dialogue Clock by Evgenia Dymkina
The Dialogue Clock’s unique design draws attention to a few things. Firstly, its immediate separation of the usually concentric coaxial watch hands. Not only do the watch hands now exist one beside the other, they also turn the positive space into negative, making the hand a cutout in a white dial. This allows the two dials (hour and minute) to look like pacman-ish faces that rotate in their place, only facing each other twice in the entire day (at 3:45). The rather unusual design of the Dialogue clock also opens it up to a lot of other explorations. Can you think of a few?

07. Darkside Stool/Side Table by Romulo Teixeira and Cintia Miyahira
Serving a reminder that inspiration can be found anywhere, even in the ever nourishing domain of art, the Darkside Stool/Side-Table pays tribute to one of the most influential music albums of our time, and its album art, that is an icon in itself. Made from Stainless Steel and Acrylic, the stool has all the visual elements from the background. The triangular prism finds itself at the base of the stool, made of stainless steel and colored black, while the prismatic material forms the acrylic seat on top. Lastly, the seven colors of the spectrum form supports for the acrylic seat (although there are only six here, to give the seating bilateral symmetry).

08. Dodo Multifunctional Chair by Mohammad Enjavi Amiri
‘Do’ means dual, or two, in Urdu and Hindi. The Dodo, by that definition perfectly describes this absolutely ingenious shapeshifting piece of furniture that shifts between two forms, and can go from chair to stool to coffee table, simply by folding one edge inwards on itself. Designed from individual beechwood slats, with stainless steel joineries and hinges, the Dodo chair can exist in two forms (open and closed), and just by doing that, can serve multiple purposes, from a barstool, to chair, to table, to even a bookshelf! Truly versatile piece of furniture, I say!


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LAST CALL! Register to participate in the A’ Design Awards now! Deadline: 28th February!

Your Lighting Design Moodboard: Winning Lighting Projects from A’ Design 2018

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Trust us, the guys in the business of curating design content, to put together a pretty neat list of products to watch out for! This is the Lighting Design Showcase from the A’ Design Award and Competition 2018, the Italy-based, international design award program that spans virtually every design category, country, and doesn’t just award design, but creates an environment for the design to grow from a concept to a product, or from a product to a well-known, profitable project.

We look at the top Lighting Designs from last year, creating a compilation of what A’ Design’s stellar 211-member international jury panel is worthy of winning the A’ Design Award. While we’re at it, do check out what winning an Award does for your Design Career, and don’t forget to head down to the A’ Design Award and Competition page to register to submit your design entries for the Award. The last date of submission is the 28th of February 2019, and the awards will be announced here on YD on the 15th of April!

Register to participate in the A’ Design Awards now! Deadline: 28th February!
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A’ Design Award 2018 Lighting Moodboard
01. Jal Lamp by Mos
Designed to look like a martini-esque hourglass with an ambient lightbulb in it, the JAL Lamp’s beauty arises from its simplicity and its ability to be whatever you want it to be. The glass comprises two conical containers in the hourglass shape, that can be used to store anything, making the lamp a rather versatile piece of decor (rather than ‘just another lamp’!). The bulb can be oriented either way, allowing you to use the lamp in any orientation that you’d like. A nice combination of simplicity, elegance, and a minimal beauty that one would associate with Scandinavian or Japanese design.

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02. Buzao – Qie Pendant light by Pr Designers: Xu Gang, Peng Zeng
Buzao – Qie’s immediate appeal comes from its contrasts. Not only does it create a color contrast with a black and gold combination (a classic, really), but it also contrasts material types and textures. On top, you’ve got a matte copper fixture with its golden metallic finish, and to contrast it with its imperfect-yet-incredible surface is black volcanic rock, resplendent with its cracks and bubble-holes. Within this volcanic rock lies the lamp that shines light on the volcanic rock’s imperfect surface. The rock brings sturdiness and insulation to the lamp too, protecting it in more ways than one. What a wonderful use of diametrically opposite materials!

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03. Reverse Pickup Table Lamp by ADD Architectural Studio
Reverse Pickup’s idea originally stems from vinyl discs and the concept of transmission of sound as the vinyl rotates on the all time classic Pickup. Originally made to dock a vinyl record, the designers replaced it with two translucent marble discs, creating an awe-inspiring light with a unique interaction. The circular marble pieces roll up and down the base of the lamp as an LED tape between them grows brighter or dimmer depending on the marble’s position. The result is a pretty nifty dimmer mechanism that powers a lamp that looks absolutely stunning with the way the light creeps through the translucent marble, creating a light that relies in part on nature, like the volcanic rock lamp above!

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04. Guilin Environment Cleansing Lamp by Kevin Chu
Kevin Chu’s Guilin lamp uses Photocatalytic coated acrylic “mountains” to connect nature to purity. The lamp’s base contains slots in which you can place etched acrylic mountain pieces. As soon as you dock these pieces in their slots, the etched pattern on the acrylic sheets scatter light, emitting an aura of light around the room. The mountains can be arranged in any way you see fit, and use photocatalytic oxidation to purify the air around you. Poetic!

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05. Mi-30 Table Lamp by Raza Zahid Atelier
Mi-30’s table lamp uses an old design trick called Gestalt’s law of visual continuity. You don’t just perceive the individual slats/sheets that comprise the lamp, but your mind ends up piecing together an entire picture. The Mi-30 uses that visual principle to create a series of amoebic forms that can captivate the eye with their abstractness, and light up the space too!

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06. Martians Floor lamp by Igor Lobanov
For its incredibly slim circular light-panel, and the tripod base that gives it an unusual look, the Martians floor lamps bag an A’ Design Award. The legs are individually angle-adjustable, allowing the lamp to practically pose, rather than stand erect. The light panel can be adjusted too, to face at a wall, directly downwards, or at a seating area.

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07. Tutu Lighting Product by Hiroki Takada
The Tutu borrows from the chaotic abundance of the Dahlia flower, replacing its multitude of petals with miniature lampshades that create volume while scattering light. Using a single source of light and dozens of folded pieces of synthetic Japanese paper, the Tutu comes to life as both a wall-light as well as a chandelier. Is it just me, or does the lamp look better in white than it would in any other color?

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08. Knitted Unique Lighting Collection by Ariel Zuckerman
A neat combination of textile and lighting, Ariel Zuckerman’s Knitted collection features orbs of light trapped within crocheted stockings. The combination of the two styles (knitting and lighting) create something that feels unique and inviting. The crocheted outer covers add color to the light, diffusing it too, to turn the orb’s brightness into a warm, scattered glow. I don’t know about you, but I’d be pushing them back and forth if I were anywhere near them!

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09. Empress Wu Lamp by Davide Chiesa & Andrea Croci
The Empress Wu lamp takes design inspiration from the formal design language of Ming furniture. It also is a hat-tip to centuries of moon-worship in China. The lamp itself isn’t as formal as you’d expect. It has a quirky character, and appears to have weight (with the way the bent wood drapes around the orb), but still manages to feel visually light. All in all, at the end of the day, it’s an orb-lamp, but it feels like more. Also, it vaguely resembles a woman’s face too. Probably a reference to Empress Wu.

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10. Mozaik system Modulable Lamp by Davide Oppizzi
Designed with a love for geometry as well as astronomy, Davide Oppizzi’s Mozaik is like a geometric interpretation of a meteor shower. Ultimately a modular light, the Mozaik can be used in a variety of ways. It can be applied independently as a singular lighting unit, or be used as a building block of sorts, in what can look like an absolutely stunning installation of geometric lighting.

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Register to participate in the A’ Design Awards now! Deadline: 28th February!