Modular office furniture brings the freedom and flexibility of LEGO to the workplace

Gone are the days of uniform-looking office cubicles that feel designed to suck the soul out of employees. Although they have their own downsides, the so-called “open floor plans” bring a bit of customization to office spaces, letting people’s and companies’ characters shine. Of course, office space is never infinite, and workers have to make do with the sometimes cramped horizontal allowance they have. Maximizing every inch of that space requires not only being creative but also furniture that delivers the functionality that you need while being space-efficient as well. This office furniture collection offers exactly that with a modular system that you can mix and match to your needs, taking inspiration from one of the most popular modular designs in modern history: LEGO blocks.

Designer: Form Us With Love for String Furniture

OK, they might not connect to each other like LEGO bricks, which would be impractical and tedious to use anyway, but the way you can combine different “block” sizes in almost endless ways is reminiscent of the creative toy. There are six different sizes of components, ranging from cube storage to rectangular shelves, and you can arrange them in any way you see fit, as long as you have horizontal and vertical clearance. You can put them side by side like a long shelf, stack them on top of each other like a cabinet, in a straight line, or in an L-shaped corner configuration. Your creativity and space are the limits.

The pieces almost look like LEGO blocks, at least metal LEGO blocks. They are made from thin with a perforated grid pattern that is meant to give them an industrial aesthetic. Of course, these holes can serve functional purposes as well, allowing you to hang hooks, screw in handles, and maybe even decorate the surfaces with your personal photos and mementos. Presuming you or your company purchases different colored sets, you might even be able to mix up colors to add even more personality to your office space.

The concept of modular furniture is nothing new, but most of these designs tend to have a fixed appearance or mode of operation, allowing owners to only remove or add parts that are specifically designed for the system. With a minimalist design that adopts the simplest shapes of squares and rectangles, Center Center allows for maximum flexibility and, more importantly, encourages creativity and individuality that are easily lost in many work environments these days.

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Orthopedic saddle chair is designed for gaming without a break and backache

Seating ergonomics are constantly changing as working hours from the desk and individual video gaming sessions grow by the day. From adjustable chairs to those with lumber support and from cushiony backrests to airy ones, the chairs have not just evolved in style, but functionality and construction in a similar breath. To that accord, chairs with saddle-shaped seats are making an uncanny appearance as people who spend longer times in front of their computer screens prefer such stools and chairs above traditional seat types.

This transition is primarily credited to the back pain; which saddle seat configuration helps easily, at least that’s how we have come to believe. I believe back pain is generally because of static sitting; for long hours. It’s the lack of movement more than anyone sitting position that impacts the back. But if you are from the school of thought that believes a seat can make a difference to your backaches, an ergonomic saddle-shape gaming chair, with adjustable features, called the ‘Cross Mantis’ is here to address your woes.

Designer: Fyodor Lazariev and Farukh Imin

The Cross Mantis orthopedic saddle chair is designed for the gaming furniture brand SILIQS. The idea was to design a chair that combines the functionality of an office chair with the comfort and benefits of a saddle seat. Saddle seat, which allows an open hip position offering good leg circulation, erect spine position, and improved balance, is an orthopedically correct fit for the spinal cord, the designers believe.

After various iterations and toiling, the gaming chair – comprising a bent aluminum frame and highly cushioned mesh fabric – is made adjustable and usable with standing tables to do gaming in more positions than just sitting up front. Since the chair is conceived for a brand specializing in e-sports furniture, it is designed in contrasting color combinations with an aggressive shape. The adjustable back support, rotating headrest and armrests, and adjustable height all allow the chair to be more versatile to use.

It would take you closer to your gaming universe so you can reach further, sit up straighter, and have various adjustable positions to lock that perfect position to nail your opponent before the brink of an eye. The Cross Mantis saddle gaming chair is designed in individual modules. It can be shipped in a box and the modules can be assembled on site.

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Bent wooden stool requires no screws or hinges to assemble from flat packaging

Flat-packed furniture has become quite the sensation, satisfying both the need for easy-to-assemble mass-produced products as well as a craving for the trendy minimalist design. There are, however, certain limits to those designs, especially because of the need to be flat and tightly packed. Putting them together also sometimes requires a bit of patience and know-how, particularly when small parts and screws are involved. This stool concept design challenges those conventions, however, by using mechanisms that require no extra parts, no screws, and even no glue, yet still delivers a multifunctional piece of furniture that looks unique and distinctive, unlike most mass-produced flat-packed products.

Designer: Joao Teixeira

The easiest method to join two separate pieces after they have left the factory would be to either screw or glue them together. The former entails more complicated parts while the other often employs chemicals harmful to the environment. There are, however, techniques that simply use shapes and the force of physics, particularly gravity, to keep two parts together. The dovetail joint, which looks like two puzzle pieces getting wedged together, is one such mechanism, and it is the technique employed by this Flat Stool design.

That in itself is already impressive, but the stool’s real claim to fame is how its sides can curve and bend despite being flat-packed. You’d usually have to resort to tricks like hinges, which you have to screw, to change a wooden plank’s direction, but the Flat Stool uses a rather unconventional design to do the same. Specifically, it uses kerf bending on those bent areas to create a gentle curve that makes it look like the piece was shipped that way right from the start.

The effect is a stool whose sides bend down and inward, attaching to the middle of the slanted legs that also have a kerf bend to them. This creates a loop on both sides, an empty space that can serve as a holding space for books, phones, or other objects that don’t need a flat, horizontal surface to lie on. As a bonus, the kerfs and ribs of the stool are exposed and visible for everyone to see, creating visual accents that make the stool look more interesting.

Admittedly, some might have concerns about how long the dovetail joints will hold over time as the wooden contacts between the joints wear down. The kerfs might also look a bit worrying, especially on the legs, given the decrease in the mass of the wooden boards. Nevertheless, it’s an interesting concept that tries to think outside the flat-packed box to provide a design that isn’t as flat, literally and figuratively.

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Unique Modular Furniture Piece lets you work, lounge, read, and relax thanks to its plug-and-play form

“Working lying down is seldom seen in office environments,” pointed out Timothy Widmer, a student at Lucerne School of Art and Design. Lying down is often associated with relaxing – the antithesis of productivity and professionalism – but if the pandemic has taught us anything, it’s that we don’t need an ‘office chair’ or a ‘cubicle’ to work. You could work from a high-chair, a beanbag, a recliner, a sofa… so why not use that as a starting point to revisit how furniture can look and behave?

Designer: Timothy Widmer

Meet Gustav, a 4-piece modular furniture set that comes together in a variety of ways. Its odd shape strays away from any kind of traditional furniture – it looks nothing like a chair, a stool, a sofa, or a pouffe. Once put together, however, you get to understand the kind of freedom and flexibility it brings, and how it could possibly be used for a variety of activities.

The Gustav is position-agnostic. It allows you to use its shape in whatever way you choose. You can sit on it like a stool, recline backwards with your legs stretched out, or even folded in. The stool’s rear space (behind the recliner) lets you store books, EDC, chargers, cables… and the cuboid-shaped pouffe at the end doubles up as a side-table just in case you want one.

A cushion strapped to the recliner can be moved up or down, giving you the height-adjustment you need

“The multi-components allow different constellations to be created – from an individual workspace to a conversation pit,” says Widmer.

Ultimately, a lot of Gustav’s success depends on the upheaval of corporate work culture. Whether offices embrace relaxed working as a practice isn’t something the Gustav can control – but it does pose a very interesting schematic for coworking spaces, cafes, and even lounges at airports. And it asks a rather fundamental question too – if productivity is a state of mind, why does the way you’re seated matter SO much?

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Stackable, plastic stool is colorful short-term multi-functional seat

Because of my bad back, I am not that much a fan of stools. But there are times that it’s the most practical (and only available) kind of seating especially if you live in Asia. On our side of the world, it’s often used for short-term use at places like street food stalls, markets, and corner pubs. There’s always room for well-designed stools that may also serve other purposes aside from sitting on it.

Designer Name: Sheng-Wen, Wang

StOol is a concept for stools that are meant for short-term use. The seat has a fan-shaped design with a stem-like backrest. It is meant for areas with minimal space and They are easily stackable so it’s easy to put them away and get them out for places that also have small storage spaces. They are made from polypropylene plastic so you can use them indoor and outdoor as well.

With the way it’s designed, you can also use the stool for other purposes. Those standing can use it as backrest or armrest. The surface of the stool can also be used to place items if you need a sort of side table. It can also be used as support for hanging objects. There can also be many colors available so it can add a splash of color to your space.

It may not seem the most comfortable place to sit on, especially for people like me who may need a sturdier backrest. But for short-term use and for small spaces, it may be an ideal kind of furniture to have.

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Polycarbonate plastic chair can be turned into side table

People have different tastes when it comes to furniture, even something as functional as chairs. There are those that look for comfort while there are those that just want something they can sit on when working. There are people who look for highly aesthetic chairs that can fit into their space while there are those that like to look for more experimental kind of chairs.

Designer Name: Liam de la Beyodere

If you’re the last kind of person, this chair concept might be right up your alley. The Push Fit Chair uses frosted injection-moulded polycarbonate plastic for its parts. When you push them together and assemble it, you get a chair that sports a crystal-clear aesthetic. The idea is for light and colors to flow through the chair and lets it cast different patterns and shapes on nearby surfaces.

You can also remove the backrest part of the chair if you want to just have a stool type of furniture. You can also put the backrest on the side so you get a side table along with your chair. There is also space under where you can store items like books and knick knacks. If you put the full chair with the chair/side table together, then you have a more complete set.

Chairs made from polycarbonate plastic may not seem the most comfortable but based on the renders, you get something really pleasing to the eyes. And of course, we love multi-functional and modular things here, so that’s another bonus fro the Push Fit Chair.

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Polycarbonate plastic chair can be turned into side table

People have different tastes when it comes to furniture, even something as functional as chairs. There are those that look for comfort while there are those that just want something they can sit on when working. There are people who look for highly aesthetic chairs that can fit into their space while there are those that like to look for more experimental kind of chairs.

Designer Name: Liam de la Beyodere

If you’re the last kind of person, this chair concept might be right up your alley. The Push Fit Chair uses frosted injection-moulded polycarbonate plastic for its parts. When you push them together and assemble it, you get a chair that sports a crystal-clear aesthetic. The idea is for light and colors to flow through the chair and lets it cast different patterns and shapes on nearby surfaces.

You can also remove the backrest part of the chair if you want to just have a stool type of furniture. You can also put the backrest on the side so you get a side table along with your chair. There is also space under where you can store items like books and knick knacks. If you put the full chair with the chair/side table together, then you have a more complete set.

Chairs made from polycarbonate plastic may not seem the most comfortable but based on the renders, you get something really pleasing to the eyes. And of course, we love multi-functional and modular things here, so that’s another bonus fro the Push Fit Chair.

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Why most chairs are outdated and Secretlab’s take on a good design for modern ergonomics

The rise of remote work has drastically changed our workspaces. The boundaries between work and play have blurred, and modern hybrid workers switch seamlessly from spreadsheets to gaming to Netflix—all from the same setup. Yet, when you think of an ergonomic chair, a mesh design like Herman Miller’s Aeron probably comes to mind. These chairs developed in the 1970s have become synonymous with corporate offices worldwide. However, is it time for us to consider other options?

Designer: Vincent Sin, Head of Industrial Design

Click Here to Know More.

Historical Context and Evolution of Ergonomic Chairs

The journey of ergonomic design began in the 1970s with chairs like the Herman Miller Aeron, which quickly became the gold standard for office seating.

Everyday workers rarely gave much thought to their sitting habits. Their typical workday meant long hours at the desk with minimal movement. Conversations about sitting often focused on achieving the perfect posture.

The rise of the tech industry and the shift to remote work blurred the lines between work and leisure. As work environments evolved, the need for more dynamic seating became clear. A good chair shouldn’t just do one thing — they must support everything from long hours of sitting to more relaxed, casual postures, no matter what you’re doing at the desk.

One company is leading this shift forward, recognizing the need for modern ergonomic solutions that meet the diverse needs of today.

The Evolution of Ergonomic Seating

Secretlab was founded in 2014 by Ian Ang and Alaric Choo, both avid gamers and StarCraft II professionals. Their journey began out of personal necessity— they needed chairs that could support their extensive practice sessions, often lasting up to 16 hours a day. Existing market options fell short of providing the required comfort and durability. This gap inspired them to design their own solution, leading to the creation of a new standard in seating.

The success of these designs among professional gamers brought Secretlab into the spotlight, but the company’s dedication to ergonomic science and high-quality materials also quickly expanded their user base beyond just the gaming community.

Today, Secretlab chairs are trusted by over 3 million users worldwide, reflecting their commitment to excellence. Despite its roots in designing chairs for esports players, the flagship chair, the Secretlab TITAN Evo, is making significant inroads into spaces traditionally dominated by mesh office chairs. From global esports stages to home offices and corporate boardrooms, it is fast becoming a top pick for anyone needing an ergonomic chair that can support long hours of sitting.

The appeal of the Secretlab TITAN Evo extends to a diverse range of users, including some of the most distinguished figures in various fields. Academy Award-winning composer Hans Zimmer, is among its users, having scored his iconic scores in movies like “Dune” and “Top Gun: Maverick” in the comfort of a Secretlab TITAN Evo chair in his studio. Similarly, World No. 1 chess grandmaster Magnus Carlsen has also adopted the Secretlab TITAN Evo, further highlighting its versatility and appeal.

The Secretlab Difference

What sets these chairs apart in a crowded market? While the Secretlab TITAN Evo might resemble other gaming chairs at first glance, a deeper inspection reveals significant differences. Every design choice is informed by extensive real-world data on how people actually sit. This commitment to evidence-based design is bolstered by collaborations with leading ergonomic experts and regular consultations with an independent Ergonomics Advisory Board to refine their products.

Central to their philosophy is the understanding that the human body is not meant to remain in a single, static posture for prolonged periods. Conversely, traditional ergonomic chairs often emphasize one “optimal” posture, which can lead to muscle and soft tissue strain over time.

Dr. Stuart McGill, professor emeritus at the University of Waterloo and a foremost authority on back pain, underscores this point. “Tissue loads must be migrated from tissue to tissue to minimize the risk of any single tissue accumulating microtrauma. This is accomplished by changing posture,” he explains.

Its proprietary pebble seat base exemplifies this philosophy. It features gently sloping sides that guide users towards the center for balanced pressure distribution while still allowing freedom to sit in various positions—whether leaning to one side or sitting cross-legged.

In comparison, most gaming chairs adopt a far more restrictive bucket seat design inspired by racing seats. These designs work well in race cars to help drivers remain snug and secure in their seats when racing at 220 mph, but they have no place in ergonomic chairs, says Secretlab.

Instead, they prioritize flexibility, allowing users to transition between different tasks and postures effortlessly.

Settling the Debate: Mesh vs. Foam in Chair Design

The choice of upholstery materials plays a critical role in chair comfort and support. While mesh is favored for its breathability, foam offers substantial support, particularly for extended use.

Research from the University of California, Berkeley, found no significant differences between foam and mesh in terms of comfort, pain, and fatigue. However, participants reported finding foam chairs more supportive over long hours, with better pressure distribution.

That said, not all foam is created equal. Secretlab engineered their own patent-pending cold-cure foam to provide uniform weight distribution and consistent density. They cured their foam at lower temperatures, resulting in a medium-firm texture that resists sagging and reduces strain on the back. By ensuring even pressure distribution, it enhances long-term comfort, making it a strong contender against traditional mesh.

Mesh chairs, on the other hand, excel in breathability, keeping users cool during long periods of sitting. The choice between foam and mesh ultimately depends on individual preferences and specific needs, but both materials have their distinct advantages.

A New Type of Computer Chair

Recognizing the shift in workplace habits accelerated by the pandemic, Secretlab leads the way in adaptable furniture design. Their chairs support various activities, from video calls to streaming, by prioritizing movement and versatility.
This approach meets the needs of today’s workers and paves the way for future ergonomic innovations, ensuring comfort and productivity in a world where work and play often overlap.

Click Here to Know More.

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Self-grooming cat house combs away loose fur each time they pass through

Furry friends are full of fun, at least until it’s time to actually keep them healthy and well-maintained. Both dogs and cats have a never-ending fur problem, but felines are more notorious for not being as enthusiastic about being brushed and combed, unlike their canine counterparts. That said, cats are also sticklers for cleanliness, but all their licking unfortunately results in unsightly hairballs in the end. This rather ingenious contraption offers a solution that makes that brushing feel almost natural to the cat, and it does so by taking advantage of the most cat-like behavior of all: squeezing into very tight spaces.

Designer: Paw-Swing

At first glance, the Paw-Swing Purrring (yes, that’s how it’s spelled) Cat Self-Grooming House looks nothing more than a felt-covered box with a rather small circular opening in front. This combination is, of course, irresistible to cats who’ll want to explore and try to fit into that tight space, which is exactly why it’s designed this way. And as soon as it passes through that hole, its loose fur gets brushed away in a manner that makes the cat feel like it’s being licked by its mother instead.

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The secret is the six cylindrical brushes around the circular entrance of the house, each with a surface designed to mimic the papillae on a cat’s tongue. To the cat, this feels like a more natural grooming method, which is normally employed by mother cats licking their young. Of course, the fur isn’t ingested and is simply stored in a separate compartment for easy cleaning later. This process happens each and every time the cat passes through the entrance, making manual grooming a thing of the past.

While the self-grooming cat house requires no electricity or motors to implement the grooming part, it does have a tech component to its design. There is an automated treat dispenser installed at the top to entice your cats to come closer to the box, and when it does go in, it records how many times the cat comes in and leaves. This data is made available to owners to help them monitor the habits and health of their feline family.

Beyond the grooming and the feeding, the Purrring cat house is also, well, a house for cats. Its felt material makes the box comfortable and safe for cats, not to mention environment-friendly and recyclable as well. The Self-Grooming Cat House thus offers a safe haven for cats that also take a load off their humans’ minds, at least until it’s time to take out the collected fur.

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Side table and shelf uses monochromatic lines and dots springing up from the ground

When it comes to side tables and shelves, I’m the kind of person who prefers it to be functional (also, affordable) rather than aesthetic. But there are also those who prefer for their furniture to be both functional and also pieces of art. Fortunately, there are a lot of designers out there who are experimenting with form while still making them useful as their original purpose.

Designer: Taeg Nishimoto, TN/MOS

Lines and dots is one such kind of furniture wherein the side-table and free-standing shelf are both pieces that you can use to place your items but can also double as sculptures in your space. It uses various materials like clay, wood, sisal twine, discarded concrete chunk, and liquid rubber to bring you something that looks pretty unique with its “spontaneous geometry” kind of design.

The lines are actually intertwining pieces of twine that start from the bottom and up. The concrete chunk that serves as the base is used to attach the sisal twine which also passes through the circular, horizontal planes in the middle. Those planes are the shelves and even though they are round, they are not perfectly circular so you get a sense of movement. The twine lines are covered in clay by hand and the traces of the fingers applying it are left there. Afterwards, all parts of the side table and shelves are covered with white liquid rubber while the clay lines get black dots.

Since the side table and shelves are in white with black dots, it comes “alive” when you place objects with vibrant colors on it. The entire look of these lines and dots gives the impression that your furniture actually “grew” vertically from the ground up. You can only place a few objects on it because of its small size but the main point is adding to the aesthetic of your space.

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