Top 10 smartwatches to replace your Apple Watch Series 7

Currently, the Apple Watch Series 7 is the most popular watch in the world, and this honestly doesn’t come as much of a surprise, when you take into consideration the number of people you see jogging or walking on the street, with their Apple Watch armed on their wrists. But the Apple Watch isn’t your only option for a smartwatch!  Designers are coming up with smartwatches that not only provide perfect form and functionality but also manage to look super smart when we wear them, and they might just be the perfect replacement for your Apple Watch 7. The options are endless, so to help you pick a smartwatch that works best for you, we’ve curated a collection of innovative and cutting-edge smartwatches that will cater to everyone’s unique time-telling needs and requirements, and also totally deserve to be on your wrists. From a smartwatch with transparent sides of the dial to a minimalistic smartwatch that boasts full-screen video calling – these futuristic designs might tempt you to ditch your Apple Watch! Enjoy!

1. Focus

While manufacturers are trying to banish bezels, Focus embraces them wholeheartedly.

Why is it noteworthy?

Taking inspiration from traffic signs, particularly the circular ones, the smartwatch uses thick bezels as a way to increase the visual focus of the small screen in the middle. There are no other superfluous markings around that screen, be it a rotating bezel or even a crown. This design is almost similar to the Pebble Time Round from 2016, but the display is even smaller, and the design decision was made by choice rather than being limited by technologies available at the time. That small screen also forces the software to be more selective in what data it shows and how. It’s pretty much limited to showing just one critical piece of information and nothing else.

What we like

  • The design of the entire smartwatch itself was made with increasing focus and removing distractions, even visually

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

2. Orb

Orb is a concept smartwatch that comes with the most important features like timekeeping, health tracking, real-time notifications, and also video calling. The smart gadget is designed for people of all ages owing to its optimized size. It’s not too big for young users and neither too small for adults.

Why is it noteworthy?

The contoured watch face can be customized with any number of digital dials, but the inherent dial comes with a monochromatic hour and minutes hands. This is matched with the light grey metal casing, and a translucent watch strap which adds a hint of spice to the minimalistic aesthetics of the smartwatch. The caseback has the Orb branding of the wearable to go with the overall design theme.

What we like

  • Minimal + clean aesthetics
  • Designed for people of all ages owing to its optimized size

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

3. The Withings smartwatch

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Specs

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Functions

The latest to be added to the smartwatch lineup is the Withings ScanWatch Horizon. It looks like a luxury divers watch, but it’s really just a fitness watch. The wearable device is a health hybrid smartwatch that’s been inspired by luxury diver watches.

Why is it noteworthy?

The Withings smartwatch comes in a luxurious sapphire-glass casing. The cover has an anti-reflection coating, while the rotating bezel is set in stainless steel. Like a real diver’s watch, its bezel has laser-engraved markings to show standard codes of diving practice. The watch also features Luminova hollow watch hands, indicators, and indices. This means you can use the watch even in low-light conditions.

What we like

  • The watch can be used underwater should you wish to use it while swimming or diving
  • Stylish and elegant-looking timepiece

What we dislike

  • The price is a little high

4. The Wrist (1)

This is reminiscent of some of the high-end skeletal watches or the niche transparent watches that expose the innards like the watch movement and other mechanical parts.

Why is it noteworthy?

So, unlike other contemporary smartwatches on the market, the Wrist (1) will expose internal components by using a crystal clear transparent case, displaying the raw beauty of the precise engineering of what makes the wearable tick from the sides. To keep up with the competition, Nothing will inculcate health and fitness-centric features such as a heart rate monitor and step counter. This is courtesy of the LED and photodiodes that work in tandem with the AI algorithms for the most accurate measurements.

What we like

  • Displays the raw beauty of the complicated inner mechanism of the smartwatch

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

5. The Two Face

Two Face Analog Smartwatch Design

This watch keeps the analog function and also offers smartwatch features. Whether analog or digital or a smartwatch, each type offers different advantages. Many people still prefer analog watches because they want to keep traditions. Such watches can also have higher values, but smartwatches can offer more functionalities.

Why is it noteworthy?

The Two Face is an analog and smartwatch in one. It looks like an analog watch but comes with a number of smartwatch features. Inspired by the idea of flipping a coin, you can switch the face if you want to use either the analog or the smartwatch side. The watch features a strap that connects the body. The watch face acts as a hinge that switches the analog and smartwatch. You can flip to whatever side depending on your need at the moment.

What we like

  • Doubles up as an analog and a smartwatch

What we dislike

  • It’s still a concept!

6. The Titanium Elektron

The Sequent Titanium Elektron offers the best of both worlds – the activity/fitness tracking features of a smartwatch or fitness band, and the accurate time-telling and everlasting power supply of a Swiss-made mechanical watch.

Why is it noteworthy?

The Titanium Elektron eliminates the one major compromise with most smartwatches – the fact that you have to routinely charge them. It does so by refining and upgrading a technology that has existed in mechanical watches for years but hasn’t really seen mass adoption by tech companies, that have wholly embraced the lithium-ion battery movement.

What we like

  • The watch has its own battery-saving mode too, and will automatically power down when not worn, conserving the battery for 12 months
  • Self-charging

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

7. The Tambour Horizon Light Up

Louis Vuitton Tambour Horizon Light Up Smartwatch

Three full years after the company announced the 1st gen Tambour Horizon in 2019, Louis Vuitton is giving the smartwatch a refresh with a newer edition that offers endless customization wrapped within a design boldly and unabashedly highlights the LV brand.

Why is it noteworthy?

The watch comes with a 1.2-inch display that sits within a stainless steel body underneath a scratch-resistant sapphire crystal. However, while most smartwatches with displays often fall within the trap of having a bezel (no matter how minimal it may be), the Tambour Horizon Light Up avoids that trap by turning the bezel into an interactive dynamic element too.

What we like

  • The smartwatch features an illusion of having a 360° ‘waterfall’ display that bends over the edges to create an endless screen effect

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

8. The Huawei WATCH GT3 Pro

If Google is going for a modern, futuristic motif with their recently announced Pixel Watch, Huawei is going for the complete opposite with their latest flagship smartwatch, the Huawei WATCH GT3 Pro.

Why is it noteworthy?

The 46mm Titanium edition is the larger of the two, measuring 46.6mm x 46.6mm x 10.9mm and weighs approximately 54 grams without a strap. That size isn’t just for show, though, since it packs a large 1.43-inch AMOLED display, with a spacious 466×466 326 PPI screen housed in a titanium case with sapphire glass on tap. Despite the mostly Titanium body, it has a ceramic rear that went through 60 processes to transform zirconia ceramic powder into this elegant finished form. The Huawei GT3 Pro Titanium model also borrows a classic rotating crown from traditional watches, offering an easy-to-use control to zoom in and out or scroll through the user interface.

What we like

  • First all-ceramic smartwatch
  • Protected by tough sapphire glass

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

9. The Wyze Watch 47c fitness smartwatch

The Wyze Watch 47c fitness smartwatch features a range of health sensors to measure your blood oxygen levels, acceleration, heart rate, and more.

Why is it noteworthy?

Equipped with a pair of LED clusters, the watch can measure your oxygen saturation to inform you of any health risks that could occur. It also records your daily step count and tracks your sleep, as well as heart rate. Amped with 9-day battery life, the watch can be worn all day without the stress of it randomly dying off.

What we like

  • The IP68 waterproof rating ensures that you can even wear it in the rain!
  • The sleek display is a 1.75″ screen with 320 x 385 pixels

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

10. The Muse

The Muse is a hybrid smartwatch with practically no learning curve. Just as intuitive as a touchscreen display, the Muse comes with the added advantage of looking like a stylish timepiece, rather than a gizmo on your wrist.

Why is it noteworthy?

With two hands on the main dial, one subdial, and one window that doesn’t show you the date, but rather displays the functions of the watch, allowing you to know exactly which function you’re running, the Muse manages to find a great middle-ground between being analog and being essentially a smart wearable. Couple that with two control buttons on the side, and you have a watch that doesn’t need a display at all. Slick and stylish, the Muse is every bit a great analog timepiece.

What we like

  • Features 4 AI assistants
  • Sapphire-coated mineral glass

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

The post Top 10 smartwatches to replace your Apple Watch Series 7 first appeared on Yanko Design.

The best smartwatches

Just a few years ago, the case for smartwatches wasn’t clear. Today, the wearable world is filled with various high-quality options, and a few key players have muscled their way to the front of the pack. Chances are, if you’re reading this guide, you’ve probably already decided that it’s time to upgrade from a standard timepiece to a smartwatch. Maybe you want to reach for your phone less throughout the day, or maybe you want to stay connected in a more discrete way. The list of reasons why you may want a smartwatch is long, as is the list of factors you’ll want to consider before deciding which to buy.

What to look for in a smartwatch

Google WearOS interface on a smartwatch.
Cherlynn Low

Compatibility

Apple Watches only work with iPhones, while Wear OS devices play nice with both iOS and Android. Smartwatches made by Samsung, Garmin, Fitbit and others are also compatible with Android and iOS, but you’ll need to install a companion app.

The smartwatch OS will also dictate the type and number of on-watch apps you’ll have access to. Many of these aren’t useful, though, making this factor a fairy minor one in the grand scheme of things.

Price

The best smartwatches generally cost between $300 and $400. Compared to budget smartwatches, which cost between $100 and $250, these pricier devices have advanced fitness, music and communications features. They also often include perks like onboard GPS, music storage and NFC, which budget devices generally don’t.

Some companies make specialized fitness watches: Those can easily run north of $500, and we’d only recommend them to serious athletes. Luxury smartwatches from brands like TAG Heuer and Hublot can also reach sky-high prices, but we wouldn’t endorse any of them. These devices can cost more than $1,000, and you’re usually paying for little more than a brand name and some needlessly exotic selection of build materials.

Battery life

Battery life remains one of our biggest complaints about smartwatches, but there’s hope as of late. You can expect two full days from Apple Watches and most Wear OS devices. Watches using the Snapdragon Wear 3100 processor support extended battery modes that promise up to five days on a charge — if you’re willing to shut off most features aside from, you know, displaying the time. Snapdragon’s next-gen Wear 4100 and 4100+ processors were announced in 2020, but only a handful of devices – some of which aren’t even available yet – are using them so far. Other models can last five to seven days, but they usually have fewer features and lower-quality displays. Meanwhile, some fitness watches can last weeks on a single charge.

A few smartwatches now support faster charging, too. For example, Apple promises the Series 7 can go from zero to 80 percent power in only 45 minutes, and get to full charge in 75 minutes. The OnePlus Watch is even speedier, powering up from zero to 43 percent in just 10 minutes. (Mind you that turned out to be one of the only good things about that device.)

Communication

Any smartwatch worth considering delivers call, text and app alerts to your wrist. Call and text alerts are self explanatory, but if those mean a lot to you, consider a watch with LTE. They’re more expensive than their WiFi-only counterparts, but data connectivity allows the smartwatch to take and receive calls, and do the same with text messages, without your phone nearby. As far as app alerts go, getting them delivered to your wrist will let you glance down and see if you absolutely need to check your phone right now.

Fitness tracking

Activity tracking is a big reason why people turn to smartwatches. An all-purpose timepiece should log your steps, calories and workouts, and most of today’s wearables have a heart rate monitor as well.

Many smartwatches also have onboard GPS, which is useful for tracking distance for runs and bike rides. Swimmers will want something water resistant, and thankfully most all-purpose devices now can withstand at least a dunk in the pool. Some smartwatches from companies like Garmin are more fitness focused than others and tend to offer more advanced features like heart-rate-variance tracking, recovery time estimation, onboard maps and more.

Health tracking on smartwatches has also seen advances over the years. Both Apple and Fitbit devices can estimate blood oxygen levels and measure ECGs. But the more affordable the smartwatch, the less likely it is that it has these kinds of health tracking features; if collecting that type of data is important to you, you’ll have to pay for the privilege.

Samsung Galaxy Watch Active
Engadget

Music

Your watch can not only track your morning runs but also play music while you’re exercising. Many smartwatches let you save your music locally, so you can connect wireless earbuds and listen to tunes without bringing your phone. Those that don’t have onboard storage for music usually have on-watch music controls, so you can control playback without whipping out your phone. And if your watch has LTE, local saving isn’t required — you’ll be able to stream music directly from the watch to your paired earbuds.

Always-on displays

Most flagship smartwatches today have some sort of always-on display, be it a default feature or a setting you can enable. It allows you to glance down at your watch to check the time and any other information you’ve set it to show on its watchface without lifting your wrist. This will no doubt affect your device’s battery life, but thankfully most always-on modes dim the display’s brightness so it’s not running at its peak unnecessarily. Cheaper devices won’t have this feature; instead, their screens will automatically turn off to conserve battery and you’ll have to intentionally check your watch to turn on the display again.

NFC

Many smartwatches have NFC, letting you pay for things without your wallet. After saving your credit or debit card information, you can hold your smartwatch up to an NFC reader to pay for a cup of coffee on your way home from a run. Keep in mind that different watches use different payment systems: Apple Watches use Apple Pay, Wear OS devices use Google Pay, Samsung devices use Samsung Pay and so forth.

Apple Pay is one of the most popular NFC payment systems, with support for multiple banks and credit cards in 72 different countries, while Samsung and Google Pay work in fewer regions. It’s also important to note that both NFC payment support varies by device as well for both Samsung and Google’s systems.

Engadget Picks

Best overall: Apple Watch

An off-angle view of the Apple Watch Series 7 on a person's wrist, showing the screen's refracted edge and the watch's dial and button.
Cherlynn Low / Engadget

The Apple Watch has evolved into the most robust smartwatch since its debut in 2015. It’s the no-brainer pick for iPhone users, and we wouldn’t judge you for switching to an iPhone just to be able to use an Apple Watch. The latest model, the Apple Watch Series 7, has solid fitness-tracking features that will satisfy the needs of beginners and serious athletes alike. It also detects if you’ve fallen, can carry out ECG tests and measures blood oxygen levels. Plus, it offers NFC, onboard music storage and many useful apps as well as a variety of ways to respond to messages.

The main differences between the Series 7 and the Series 6 that preceded it are the 7’s larger display, its overnight respiratory tracking and faster charging. The slight increase in screen real estate allows you to see things even more clearly on the small device, and Apple managed to fit a full QWERTY keyboard on it to give users another way to respond to messages. The faster charging capabilities are also notable – we got 10 percent power in just 10 minutes of the Watch sitting on its charging disk, and it was fully recharged in less than one hour.

While the $399 Series 7 is the most feature-rich Apple Watch to date, it’s also the most expensive model in the Watch lineup, and for some shoppers there might not be clear benefits over older editions. Those who don’t need an always-on display, ECG or blood oxygen readings might instead consider the Apple Watch SE, which starts at $279.

We actually regard the Watch SE as the best option for first-time smartwatch buyers, or people on stricter budgets. You’ll get all the core Apple Watch features as well as things like fall detection, noise monitoring and emergency SOS, but you’ll have to do without more advanced hardware perks like a blood oxygen sensor and ECG monitor.

Buy Apple Watch Series 7 at Amazon - $399Buy Apple Watch SE at Amazon - $279

Best budget: Fitbit Versa 2

Engadget

Dropping $400 on a smartwatch isn’t feasible for everyone, which is why we recommend the Fitbit Versa 2 as the best sub-$200 option. It’s our favorite budget watch because it offers a bunch of features at a great price. You get all of these essentials: Fitbit’s solid exercise-tracking abilities (including auto-workout detection), sleep tracking, water resistance, connected GPS, blood oxygen tracking and a six-day battery life. It also supports Fitbit Pay using NFC and it has built-in Amazon Alexa for voice commands. While the Versa 2 typically costs $150, we’ve seen it for as low as $100.

Buy Fitbit Versa 2 at Amazon - $150

Best for Android users: Samsung Galaxy Watch 4

A black Samsung Galaxy Watch 4 on a wrist
David Imel for Engadget

Samsung teamed up with Google recently to revamp its smartwatch OS, but that doesn’t mean Tizen fans should fret. The Galaxy Watch 4 is the latest flagship wearable from Samsung and it runs on WearOS with the new One UI, which will feel familiar if you’ve used Tizen before. Also, the watch now comes with improved third-party app support and access to the Google Play Store, so you can download apps directly from the watch.

We like the Galaxy Watch 4 for its premium design as well as its comprehensive feature set. It has a 3-in-1 biometric sensor that enables features like body mass scanning, bloody oxygen tracking and more, plus it has a plethora of trackable workout profiles. Both the Galaxy Watch 4 and the Watch 4 Classic run on new 5nm processors and have more storage than before, as well as sharper, brighter displays. They both run smoothly and rarely lag, but that performance boost does come with a small sacrifice to battery life: the Galaxy Watch 4 typically lasted about one day in our testing, which while not the best, may not be a dealbreaker for you if you plan on recharging it every night.

Buy Galaxy Watch 4 at Amazon - $250

Fashion-forward options

Michael Kors Access Gen 5e MKGO at CES 2021
Fossil

Yes, there are still companies out there trying to make “fashionable” smartwatches. Back when wearables were novel and generally ugly, brands like Fossil, Michael Kors and Skagen found their niche in stylish smartwatches that took cues from analog timepieces. You also have the option to pick up a “hybrid” smartwatch from companies like Withings and Garmin – these devices look like standard wrist watches but incorporate some limited functionality like activity tracking and heart rate monitoring. They remain good options if you prefer that look, but thankfully, wearables made by Apple, Samsung, Fitbit and others have gotten much more attractive over the past few years.

Ultimately, the only thing you can’t change after you buy a smartwatch is its case design. If you’re not into the Apple Watch’s squared-off corners, all of Samsung’s smartwatches have round cases that look a little more like a traditional watch. Most wearables are offered in a choice of colors and you can pay extra for premium materials like stainless steel. Once you decide on a case, your band options are endless – there are dozens of first- and third-party watch straps available for most major smartwatches, allowing you to change up your look whenever you please.

Cherlynn Low contributed to this guide.

Withings Scanwatch Horizon Smartwatch looks like a luxury diver’s watch

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Specs

Withings is a brand many of us know to deliver excellent fitness and health tracking and monitoring features. It continues to come up with products that don’t only look good but also offer top-notch performance.

The latest to be added to the smartwatch lineup is the Withings ScanWatch Horizon. It looks like a luxury divers watch, but it’s really just a fitness watch. The wearable device is a health hybrid smartwatch that’s been inspired by luxury diver watches.

Designer: Withings

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Functions

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Style

The connected health category is here to stay, and Withings will remain part of the revolution. The watch is now available in the United States with a $499 price tag. For a health and fitness-focused watch, the price is a little bit high, but it does look like a luxury watch. However, it is one stylish and elegant-looking timepiece that you can wear for a long time. Watch aficionados who value their health can consider this one from Withings if they want to start their fitness journey.

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Function

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Green Blue

The Withings Scanwatch Horizon features the usual health tracking features: ECG and monitor heart rate, blood oxygen levels, breathing disturbances, physical activity, and sleep. In addition, the watch can be used underwater should you wish to use it while swimming or diving.

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Features

Withings ScanWatch Horizon

The Withings smartwatch comes in a luxurious sapphire-glass casing. The cover has an anti-reflection coating, while the rotating bezel is set in stainless steel. Like a real diver’s watch, its bezel has laser-engraved markings to show standard codes of diving practice. The watch also features Luminova hollow watch hands, indicators, and indices. This means you can use the watch even in low-light conditions.

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Image

A rubberized wristband can replace the ScanWatch Horizon’s stainless-steel band if you want a more sporty look and feel. In addition, the watch’s battery life can last up to 30 days on a single full charge. It also offers 10 ATM water resistance so that you can wear it for water sports, snorkeling, and swimming.

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Parts

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Demo

The watch works with a connected Health Mate app. It has the standard tech and fitness features, including ECG-tracking while underwater. That is not impossible because the watch has been clinically-validated. Its mirror-polished serrated bezel works as an electrode, so tracking and recording can be done with speed and convenience. Under normal circumstances, the 30-second ECG recording works. Results are then shown on the screen and checked in the compatible app. You can view there an in-depth diagnostic report of your health.

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Launch

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Price

Withings ScanWatch Horizon Green

The post Withings Scanwatch Horizon Smartwatch looks like a luxury diver’s watch first appeared on Yanko Design.

The Dot Watch is the first Braille smartwatch in the world

Braille Smartwatch Dot Watch Function

Braille is one of the most important writing systems in the world today. The centuries-old system is still very much being used these days. Despite the advent of technology, the tactile writing system for the visually impaired is still deemed a significant language.

Braille is not exactly a language but it’s more of a code. Nevertheless, this system remains useful since there are people who have poor or no vision at all. There are plenty of concept product designs introduced in recent years, but not many have been transformed into reality.

Designer: YeongKyu Yoo (cloudandco design studio)

The Dot Watch

The latest we discovered is the Braille Smartwatch for Visually Impaired. It’s a smartwatch that preserves the beauty of Braille. It is said to be the first moving braille smartwatch in the world designed for the visually impaired. The smartwatch comes with a powerful and cohesive look. It has a unique display with built-in four cells where the “interaction” happens. In addition, it has touch sensors on both sides that respond to gestures.

Braille Dot Watch

The concept is a response to the fact that there are many vision-impaired communities today, and there aren’t many tools available. About 95% of the blind give up learning braille because resources are expensive or because they think braille technology is already outdated.

The Braille Smartwatch, called the Dot Watch, is for the forgotten. It is perhaps the easiest and most accessible device a visually-impaired person can use. It really is a smart watch in the sense it allows people to communicate.

Braille Smartwatch Dot Watch Where to Buy

The concept is actually from a few years ago. In fact, it has already received a few awards and recognitions. It’s something we’ve wanted to see become a reality. It is an actual product now that can balance beauty and functionality.

The Dot Watch weighs only 29 grams but is packed with potential. It uses the smallest Braille cell technology in the world, developed b Dot Inc. It connects to a smartphone via Bluetooth so you can be notified of who is calling. When you receive a text on the phone, the message is translated to Braille and is communicated to the Dot Watch for you to “read”. The touch controls on the watch face are intuitive, and the Auto-Scroll is customizable. Messages can be saved so you can check on them later.

Braille Smartwatch Dot Watch Images

The Dot Watch is priced at $299 and each unit comes with three additional ProSkins, one Dot Watch Magnetic Charger, and a one-year warranty card. We believe his DOT WATCH with Braille is a perfect example of a great idea coming to life. You can purchase directly from HERE.

Braille Smartwatch Dot Watch Price

Braille Smartwatch Dot Watch Features

Braille Smartwatch Dot Watch Images

Braille Smartwatch Dot Watch Technology

Braille Smartwatch Dot Watch Details

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Two Face analog and smartwatch must be flipped to switch the watch mode

The meaning of two-faced is the kind of friend you don’t want to have. The double-dealing and devious definition of the word is something you don’t ever want to meet or be close to in your lifetime. But the word gets another meaning with this Two Face Smartwatch. You guess it right: the watch has two faces.

Oh no, you won’t really see two faces or dials at once. This watch keeps the analog function and also offers smartwatch features. Whether analog or digital or a smartwatch, each type offers different advantages. Many people still prefer analog watches because they want to keep traditions. Such watches can also have higher values, but smartwatches can offer more functionalities.

Designers: Junguk Shin, Euikyun Koh, and Dawn BYSJ

Two Face Analog Smartwatch Design

The Two Face is an analog and smartwatch in one. It looks like an analog watch but comes with a number of smartwatch features. Inspired by the idea of flipping a coin, you can switch the face if you want to use either the analog or the smartwatch side. The watch features a strap that connects the body. The watch face acts as a hinge that switches the analog and smartwatch. You can flip to whatever side depending on your need at the moment.

Two Face Analog Smartwatch Design

Two Face Analog Smart Watch Concept

Like a classic analog watch, the Two Face boasts a smooth round dial. The other side offers the same smooth touchscreen experience most smartwatches offer. The concept design was from several years ago but it remains a timeless project that may be considered for production. It may probably not sell as much as more modern smartwatches but the one-of-a-kind timepiece can be sought after by modern watch collectors.

Two Face Analog Smart Watch Concept Specs

Two Face Analog Smart Watch Wireless Charger

Two Face is designed by South Korean designers Junguk Shin, Euikyun Koh, and Dawn BYSJ. It is designed to work with a wireless charger. You simply remove the watch from the strap and attach it to a wireless charger. Once attached to the charger, it looks like a pocket watch from decades ago but with a more modern and seamless look and feel.

Two Face Analog Smart Watch Concept Features

Two Face Analog Smartwatch Concept

The Two Face watch literally has two faces and each side shows the watch type. We’re just interested in its real thickness. It appears thin as per the rendered images but since there are two watch mechanisms, it should be thicker.

The designers presented the analog dial in different colors. It’s not impossible to have several color options. What techie lovers will look at are the specs and features of the smartwatch. We’re assuming it can run most wearable OS available and have the basic smartwatch functionalities.

Two Face Analog Smart Design

Two Face Analog Smart Watch Concept 2

Two Face Analog Smart Design Color

Two Face Analog Smart Design Color

The post Two Face analog and smartwatch must be flipped to switch the watch mode first appeared on Yanko Design.

Ehsaas Braille watch concept will let the visually impaired feel the time

It’s interesting how unique concept designs from some years ago inspired a number of products we commonly use these days. That’s how important conceptual products are. You design something and even if it doesn’t become a reality, some group will pick up the idea and bring it into production.

Most conceptual product designs inspire and spark the imagination. The Ehsaas from several years ago gave the world hope for the blind. The watch was meant for the blind as it uses the Braille writing system. As a widely used tactile writing system, Braille can be used on anything or anywhere a blind person can access. It’s used for learning and communication with only the use of raised dots.

Designer: Nikhil Kapoor

EHSAAS Braille Watch

Feeling those dots will tell you what is being communicated. Designer Nikhil Kapoor once imagined a watch for the blind. It was called the Ehsaas and was designed with a Braille system. Braille numbers are on the watch face area so the blind can feel the time.

EHSAAS Braille Watch

This is no ordinary watch. It uses an Electronic Active Polymer on the watch face. The watch strap is elastic which makes it comfortable and easy to wear. Keeping track of time may be easier now compared to several years ago when the Ehsaas was designed but using Braille is still a significant moment for visually impaired people.

Time can be told but it can’t be touched nor felt. But with a Braille watch, it can be felt. The simple watch makes reading the time easy. A blind person can just slide on and feel the dots and tell time.

EHSAAS Braille Watch

EHSAAS Braille Watch

The Braille code is fabricated by an Electronic Active Polymers. It tells the time including the hour and minute. The two codes are separated by a line. At the bottom part is a small part that reminds the wearer of the right way of wearing.

The watch is stored in special packaging. Inside the box, you will see the instructions on how to use the concept watch in braille. With this wearable device, the “feel of the time is what matters”. The feel of the watch doesn’t really count now but it still needs to accomplish its purpose.

EHSAAS Braille Watch

EHSAAS Braille Watch

The post Ehsaas Braille watch concept will let the visually impaired feel the time first appeared on Yanko Design.

Top 10 smartwatch designs that’ll make you trade in your Apple Watch Series 7

Currently, the Apple Watch Series 7 is the most popular watch in the world, and this honestly doesn’t come as much of a surprise, when you take into consideration the number of people you see jogging or walking on the street, with their Apple Watch armed on their wrists. But the Apple Watch isn’t your only option for a smartwatch!  Designers are coming up with smartwatches that not only provide perfect form and functionality but also manage to look super smart when we wear them, and they might just be the perfect replacement for your Apple Watch 7. The options are endless, so to help you pick a smartwatch that works best for you, we’ve curated a collection of innovative and cutting-edge smartwatches that will cater to everyone’s unique time-telling needs and requirements, and also totally deserve to be on your wrists. From a smartwatch with transparent sides of the dial to a fashionable smartwatch that keeps track of the air quality in your room – these futuristic designs might tempt you to ditch your Apple Watch! Enjoy!

1. The Concept One Watch

This watch conceptualized by Michael Szczególski of 2sympleks Design draws inspiration from the OnePlus Concept One phone that has an electrochromic glass (based on electronic CMF technology) for the camera module glass covering. While on first look it might seem like any other smartwatch, there’s one thing that makes it stand out from the crowd. When the camera app is activated, the glass magically turns transparent to reveal the sensors otherwise hidden from plain sight. The Concept One Watch employs this technology to blur the lines between a classic analog watch with kinetic movement and modern-day smartwatch functionality. The Android WearOS watch is a perfect hybrid capable of satisfying proponents of classic watches and ones who like the more modern approach of the connected ecosystem of smartwatches.

2. The Focus Smartwatch

While manufacturers are trying to banish bezels, Focus embraces them wholeheartedly. Taking inspiration from traffic signs, particularly the circular ones, the smartwatch uses thick bezels as a way to increase the visual focus of the small screen in the middle. There are no other superfluous markings around that screen, be it a rotating bezel or even a crown. This design is almost similar to the Pebble Time Round from 2016, but the display is even smaller, and the design decision was made by choice rather than being limited by technologies available at the time. That small screen also forces the software to be more selective in what data it shows and how. It’s pretty much limited to showing just one critical piece of information and nothing else.

3. The Wrist (1)

This is reminiscent of some of the high-end skeletal watches or the niche transparent watches that expose the innards like the watch movement and other mechanical parts. So, unlike other contemporary smartwatches on the market, the Wrist (1) will expose internal components by using a crystal clear transparent case, displaying the raw beauty of the precise engineering of what makes the wearable tick from the sides. To keep up with the competition, Nothing will inculcate health and fitness-centric features such as a heart rate monitor and step counter. This is courtesy of the LED and photodiodes that work in tandem with the AI algorithms for the most accurate measurements.

4. The Titanium Elektron

The Sequent Titanium Elektron offers the best of both worlds – the activity/fitness tracking features of a smartwatch or fitness band, and the accurate time-telling and everlasting power supply of a Swiss-made mechanical watch. The Titanium Elektron eliminates the one major compromise with most smartwatches – the fact that you have to routinely charge them. It does so by refining and upgrading a technology that has existed in mechanical watches for years but hasn’t really seen mass adoption by tech companies, that have wholly embraced the lithium-ion battery movement.

5. The Tambour Horizon Light Up

Louis Vuitton Tambour Horizon Light Up Smartwatch

Three full years after the company announced the 1st gen Tambour Horizon in 2019, Louis Vuitton is giving the smartwatch a refresh with a newer edition that offers endless customization wrapped within a design boldly and unabashedly highlights the LV brand. The watch comes with a 1.2-inch display that sits within a stainless steel body underneath a scratch-resistant sapphire crystal. However, while most smartwatches with displays often fall within the trap of having a bezel (no matter how minimal it may be), the Tambour Horizon Light Up avoids that trap by turning the bezel into an interactive dynamic element too.

6. The Nubia

The Nubia is to smart-watches what the plus-sized displays are to smartphones. The watch comes with an impressive 4-inch display that wraps around the upper half of your wrist, giving the Nubia the largest display on a smart wearable BY FAR. Designed to help lay the information out in a way that’s easy to see no matter the angle, Nubia’s vertical display is instantly eye-catching and is conveniently long enough so that you don’t need to scroll away on a tiny screen. It comes with a real-time heart-rate tracker, 4 dedicated sports/fitness tracking modes, the ability to accept and reject calls, find your phone if it gets lost, and summon your phone’s native voice assistant.

7. The Wyze Watch 47c fitness smartwatch

The Wyze Watch 47c fitness smartwatch features a range of health sensors to measure your blood oxygen levels, acceleration, heart rate, and more. Equipped with a pair of LED clusters, the watch can measure your oxygen saturation to inform you of any health risks that could occur. It also records your daily step count and tracks your sleep, as well as heart rate. Amped with 9-day battery life, the watch can be worn all day without the stress of it randomly dying off. The IP68 waterproof rating ensures that you can even wear it in the rain! The sleek display is a 1.75″ screen with 320 x 385 pixels.

8. The MedBot

The MedBot is a smartwatch concept that monitors each user’s health conditions, measures blood pressure, stores medications and pills, and sets health-specific reminders. Architectural designer Batyrkhan Bayaliev produced the MedBot, a smartwatch that monitors health, stores medication, and reminds users when it’s time to take antibiotics and various pills. Intent on exploring the intersection of health and smart technology, Bayaliev created MedBot as a means for everyone to have access to their health and catalog of medications throughout the day, wherever and whenever. Similar in fashion to an Apple Watch, Medbot maintains a sleek, inconspicuous design that leaves enough room for a storage compartment where users can keep their pills and medication.

9. The Muse

The Muse is a hybrid smartwatch with practically no learning curve. Just as intuitive as a touchscreen display, the Muse comes with the added advantage of looking like a stylish timepiece, rather than a gizmo on your wrist. With two hands on the main dial, one subdial, and one window that doesn’t show you the date, but rather displays the functions of the watch, allowing you to know exactly which function you’re running, the Muse manages to find a great middle-ground between being analog and being essentially a smart wearable. Couple that with two control buttons on the side, and you have a watch that doesn’t need a display at all. Slick and stylish, the Muse is every bit a great analog timepiece.

10. The ZOS smartwatch

The ZOS smartwatch tries to take the mystery out of sleep management and analyzes sleeping habits in order to recommend better sleeping times and conditions. It also has features like smart alarms and even ASMR audio recordings to help induce sleep. The ZOS smartwatch concept doesn’t exactly look like your typical smartwatch, especially with its elongated screen. It is, however, designed for maximum comfort since you are supposed to be wearing it even in your sleep. The choice of magnetic straps and leather material was made with that in mind, ensuring the wearer’s wrist won’t be irritated in the middle of the night, disrupting their sleep.

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Focus smartwatch concept throws almost all conventions out the window

Smartwatches are meant to be smart but are they really meant to be smartphones on our wrists? This concept says, “absolutely not!”

It took a long time, but smartwatches have finally become more mainstream. For the longest time, both manufacturers and consumers have been confused about where this particular category of products fell, whether it’s on the health side like fitness trackers or on the smartphone side as partners in crime. Some think that smartwatches have leaned too much towards the latter, and a pair of designers are putting the focus back on a smartwatch’s most important function.

Designers: Sam Beaney and Ed Burgess

A smartwatch’s core purpose might mean different things for different people, but like their less complicated counterparts, smartwatches offer information when and where you need it in the most instantaneous and simplest way possible. Most smartwatches with sophisticated functions and health sensors also have a high information density when it comes to watchfaces, something that the Focus smartwatch is moving away from.

While manufacturers are trying to banish bezels, Focus embraces them wholeheartedly. Taking inspiration from traffic signs, particularly the circular ones, the smartwatch uses thick bezels as a way to increase the visual focus of the small screen in the middle. There are no other superfluous markings around that screen, be it a rotating bezel or even a crown. This design is almost similar to the Pebble Time Round from 2016, but the display is even smaller, and the design decision was made by choice rather than being limited by technologies available at the time.

That small screen also forces the software to be more selective in what data it shows and how. It’s pretty much limited to showing just one critical piece of information and nothing else. At the same time, the designers had to settle on iconography that would make that information understandable in a single, quick glance. Contrast that with the information and visual overload that’s common among smartwatches today, putting focus more on a fancy representation that sometimes requires a second or two to digest the information it is showing.

The design of the entire smartwatch itself was made with increasing focus and removing distractions, even visually. Although the straps are interchangeable, they’re designed in a way that they sit flush with the watch’s body, creating a nearly seamless surface that’s unbroken by any button or knob. This not only makes the smartwatch simple to operate but also simple to look at, making the simple screen its true focus.

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TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4 comes with a full-day battery and a deal to knock down its price a bit

TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4 Price

Tag Heuer is a name that has always been associated with luxury. It’s just one of the many names true-blue horologists know in their hearts. For ordinary watch users, the brand is just expensive.

But with tech enthusiasts, TAG Heuer has a new image. The name represents a connected smartwatch that blends traditional Swiss watchmaking with modern technology. The company has been releasing smartwatches the past few years already and each model has come out to prove more than just the avant-garde look TAG Heuer offers. A luxury watch with modern functionalities can be the ultimate timepiece. Not all designs may pass the condescending eyes of watch lovers but we’re certain regular consumers will love this.

Designer: Tag Heuer

TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4 Where to Buy

The TAG Heuer Connected lineup delivers traditional-looking watches that are bigger in size, housing powerful features and specs. The latest model introduced in the market—the TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4–is definitely top caliber. It’s already the fourth generation Connected watch from the company as it continues with numerous improvements and refinements to achieve a product that delivers.

The TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4 features a new 42mm case design. There is also a slightly bigger 45mm version. Compared to the older models, the stainless steel case model has been refined a bit to improve the user experience. The crown is larger for easier grip and interaction with the other functionalities.

TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4

Like a traditional watch, it has pushers but instead of controlling the chronograph, they control other mechanisms. They are more refined and more set on the case. This design actually extends to the lugs, resulting in a more lightweight feel on your wrist and better ergonomics.

TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4 Renders

The TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4 42mm is a new size option. It’s the same with the 45mm variant with the bigger crown, stainless steel material, refined pushers, and elegant finishes. Only the 45MM model will come with a black DLC treated titanium case. It makes the watch look and feel more sporty. The 42MM model also won’t feature a ceramic bezel so don’t be surprised if the smaller watch looks more elegant and cleaner.

TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4 Release

For fitness enthusiasts or those who want to start living a healthy lifestyle, the TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4 comes with guided workouts. This feature doesn’t even need any compatible device like a laptop or TV as the programmed workouts are right there on your wrist. You simply look at the small screen and follow the exercises with pre-set animation and length.

TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4 Colors

The watch will directly guide you to do the correct movement and form for every exercise. It will also prompt you to do the next workout or form by vibrating. You can take advantage of the sports app to enter your own routines. This will be helpful for those with custom workouts whether on the 42mm or 45mm model. Of course, the Wear OS by Google makes the smartwatch more powerful. With access to the Google Play Store, you can download more wearable apps from the  Google Play Store.

TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4 Accesory

The TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4 comes with a new charging stand. The new design of the charger allows a clutter-free desk or nightstand. It makes for a classy watch stand—as if you’re looking at the window display of your favorite watch store. The smartwatch can still display the time with a dimmed brightness. It also keeps the wearable device in place, thanks to the four integrated magnets in front.

The previous TAG Heuer smartwatches have already proven to be more than just eye candies. The screen has been improved with better visibility especially under direct sunlight. An almost full-day battery can be expected for the larger model. To give you a picture, it can last for a whole day packed with activities including a couple of hours of walking, an hour of running, and five hours of golf.

The smaller 42mm model’s battery can also last a full day including wellness and an hour of running. The watch now comes with an altimeter so it can measure the altitude of a user’s location. To complete the look, you can choose the strap you want. It can be leather for a classic timepiece look and feel. You can settle for a rubber strap in your favorite color if you want a sporty look. A steel bracelet is also an option.

If you own a previous TAG Heuer Connected watch, you can join the brand’s trade-in program to get the latest Connected Watch Calibre E4. You will be asked to surrender your older watch and then receive credits that you can then use to purchase the newer model. The points or equivalent amount will be taken off the $2,600 starting price.

TAG Heuer Connected Calibre E4 Launch

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Meta Band with two cameras makes video chats and vlogging the center of your metaverse experience

Meta’s first stake in the Metaverse might not be a VR headset (even though the company killed the Oculus brand and promptly named it Meta) but a smartwatch that could make you lose more time in video chats, vlogging, and, of course, VR.

Even before Zucerberg’s Facebook rebranded itself to proclaim its new obsession, the social media giant was already rumored to have its eyes on the wearables market. Its focus on the Metaverse might have sounded like it would be ditching those plans, but, on the contrary, its vision for a smartwatch would fit in perfectly with this. Meta was recently granted a patent that shows its vision for such a wearable, and, to no one’s surprise, it’s going to be more about keeping in touch than keeping time.

Facebook Face

Meta’s idea for a smartwatch completely goes against most industry conventions, which is fairly typical for patent applications. It seems that the company hasn’t yet decided on whether it will aim for a typical round smartwatch or a square one that will surely earn Apple’s ire. No matter which design it chooses, the set of hardware features remain the same. There is at least one camera on its face, similar to rumors that abounded last year about a squarish Facebook smartwatch, but that’s hardly the most exciting part about Meta’s smartwatch.

The form of the smartwatch itself is already atypical. While the screen has a square design like the Apple Watch, its body is a little more oblong if not rectangular. The case extrudes to the side and tapers gently down where the cords of the strap come out (more on that later). The body has a minimalist aesthetic that is almost free of any marks, and the only notable blemish in that design is the dreaded notch that houses a tiny camera inside.

Having a front-facing camera is quite on par for a company best known for capitalizing on any opportunity to be social. Back when it was still Facebook, it launched its first smart display product line, and Portal was clearly designed for video chats via Messenger. In addition to plain posts on social media, Meta has been doubling down on real-time communication channels, especially during the past years, where video chats have become critical to keeping human civilization from collapsing.

Thus Meta or Facebook-branded smartwatch with that core functionality wouldn’t be so far-fetched, but that might just be the tip of the iceberg. Rather than straining people’s arms when making video calls, it seems that Meta has envisioned a way to make such chats fun again. And it all starts with another camera on the watch.

Is two really better than one?

According to the rumor mill, the Meta Watch will have a second camera on its back that would have nearly the same capabilities as the one on the back of your phone. That means it would be able to record 1080p Full HD videos, whether for recording or for video calls and even have an autofocus system. Of course, that camera will be completely pointless if all it sees is the back of your wrist, and that’s where the other unique or almost incredulous “feature” of this smartwatch comes into play.

You will be able to detach the smartwatch from your wrist, or at least from the frame that magnetically holds the body in place. This frees that second camera to be used properly, turning the watch’s screen into a viewfinder. That’s a terribly inefficient camera, you might wonder, especially when you have a better camera hiding in your pocket. That might miss the point, though, because you have to see it from the eyes of a company that built its fortunes on keeping people connected or keeping them addicted to sharing things on its network.

Detached from the confines of your wrist, the Meta Watch easily becomes a rival to the GoPro, something you probably wouldn’t want to use your phone for. Action cams aren’t exactly known for their high-resolution screens or even their high-resolution cameras. They’re better known for being small and almost inconspicuous, ready to capture the action (hence the name) at any given time and place. Meta’s smartwatch will make it easy for Facebook users to record video or live stream without having to pull out their phones, especially in circumstances where holding a $1,700 piece of electronics would be tempting fate.

This two-camera setup could also go beyond straightforward video chats or streaming. Smartphones these days are capable of using both back and front cameras at the same time, often with the front camera’s video feed displayed as an inset on the viewfinder. A smartwatch screen is too cramped for that kind of interface, but the functionality could still be present. Imagine talking with a buddy or family and then popping out the watch to give them a better view of the picturesque lake in front of your vacation cabin. How’s that for FOMO?

Video chats, action cuts, live streams, and vlogging all have equal opportunity on a smartwatch with two cameras, especially one that you can pop out from its base. The design sounds a bit ridiculous at first, but it won’t take long to realize how much Meta can squeeze out of it to further its goal of bringing people closer together, which really means having these people use its products and services.

It’s all in the wrist

Meta’s patent doesn’t exactly talk about the design of the smartwatch strap other than the base that holds the watch itself in place. Oftentimes, straps are only an afterthought and only come into play when talking about comfort. It is, however, also a prime opportunity for innovation, as designer Sarang Sheth illustrates.

Rather than the typical watch wristband, the designer envisioned Meta using an elastic paracord that runs through the top and bottom of the smartwatch body, creating a complete loop. The material isn’t less comfortable than a strap made from leather, steel, or silicone. In fact, this more open design makes it easier for the skin to breathe more easily, reducing the risks of skin irritation.

The most ingenious part of this strap design, however, is in the way it opens up the smartwatch to more uses without the need to buy accessories. Simply slide down the body to one end, and you can carry the Meta Watch like a pocket watch. It might even be possible to hang or wrap the watch on some other object for an ad hoc action cam setup.

There might even be opportunities here to add a metaverse flavor to the strap design. Something that may look as plain as a cord loop can have a fantastic appearance when viewed through digital eyes, allowing for customizations that wouldn’t be possible in the physical realm. There could be a market for such virtual designs, even perhaps sold exclusively through NFTs.

Even with its bare design, however, this kind of strap displays a unique character that matches the minimalist design of the body. There’s also a bit of symbolism at play here too, with a loop that is easily associated with infinity, Meta’s chosen logo.

Meta Time in the Metaverse

While these use cases sound typical for Meta, it might not be immediately clear where Meta’s Metaverse begins. After all, this smartwatch sounds more like a downsized smartphone, one that has direct access to Facebook and Meta’s other social networks. Those social networks are the foundations of Meta’s thrust to make mixed reality more social, and what better way to normalize that idea than by making it too easy for people to just chat all day long on their Meta watches.

Accessing the Metaverse from the tiny screen of a smartwatch might not be the most immersive experience, but it is the easiest way that won’t involve having to hold your phone all the time. Simply raising your wrist might be enough to carry on a conversation with someone through a metaverse network, and you won’t have to worry too much about not seeing what’s in front of you.

The detachable design of the watch also makes it the perfect companion to AR glasses. Ideally, such eyewear would have built-in cameras, but there are still technical limitations to how you can squeeze those sensors into a thin frame. More importantly, such cameras are too hidden and discrete that it raises privacy concerns that, in turn, reduce the glasses’ commercial potential (just ask Google). Nothing says you’re recording than having a detached smartwatch raised and pointed at some object, scene, or even person.

Even when not in use as a video recording device, Meta’s smartwatch also has indirect applications in the Metaverse. With biometric sensors for motion, heart rate, temperature, and more, the wearable could provide Meta with the necessary data for a more accurate representation of your Metaverse avatar or, more likely, to send you an advertisement on the best sports drink to help replenish your electrolytes.

Privacy Watch

While smartwatches are pretty much a mainstay in consumer electronics these days, a Meta Watch will still attract scrutiny and criticism more than any other smartwatch maker in the market. That’s not really because of the odd design of the watch itself, presuming it does come to pass, and more about the company. It may have changed its name, but Meta still has that effect on anything it touches.

It won’t be the first smartwatch to have a camera, but the mere fact that there are no more smartwatches with cameras today might clue you in on how the market collectively decided it was a bad idea. The privacy implications of having such a discrete recording device disguised as an ordinary, everyday accessory was too big a matter to ignore. Now imagine that same technology in the hands of a company that has been a poster child on how not to do privacy.

It doesn’t really matter where the camera is pointing at because there will always be a time when it will be able to see everything around you. A flick of the wrist or a turn of an arm could provide a bigger picture of a wearer’s surroundings, even when the camera is supposed to be disabled. Of course, Meta will always defend its privacy practices, and Facebook’s thousands of users clearly indicate how many might not mind that at all, as long as it brings convenience and social connection.

It’s still not clear at this point if Meta will actually pursue such a smartwatch design, particularly one that is admittedly as innovative as this. It’s only a matter of time, though, if it stays true to its Metaverse mission because, by then, anything and everything in the meatverse will be tied to the Metaverse.

Designer/Visualizer: Sarang Sheth

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