This Tesla electric bike’s frame shape-shifts form depending on riding conditions

A Tesla-branded electric bike concept designed to shape-shift the frame according to the rider’s position and the riding condition – ideal for the future of comfortable bike riding.

Tesla has gripped the electric four-wheeler market by the scruff of the neck and it’s only growing stronger with each passing year. The two-wheeler segment is by far untouched by the California-based EV maker. Given the visionary Elon Musk is, getting into the more lucrative two-wheeled electric vehicle market is not a far-fetched dream for him. So, how would a Tesla motorcycle be like? Will it have the same sharp characteristics as the Cybertruck or the flowing design of the Tesla Model 3?

This concept Tesla bike by San Diego-based renowned automotive designer Ash Thorp in close collaboration with Carlos “colorsponge” is pure dope. Ash calls this attention-grabbing set of wheels “THE SOKUDO” (meaning measuring in Japanese), and it is a part of the ongoing M.H.C. Collection by the duo. This being the 14th project in the collection.

The Tesla-themed bike here exudes a very refined persona honed by the custom-made extruded chassis having a battery pack and electric motor which is mated to a compact USD fork and single swing-arm. The lines and angles of this swing arm match the form of the bike frame – lending it a flowing characteristic. THE SOKUDO also has the Ducati DNA in part as the Ash and colorsponge took cues from their own custom Ducati bike build to create the reference point for this two-wheeler. The bike rides on big carbon fiber wheels having disc covers that match the Tesla theme.

According to the designer, both the suspension and the rear control arm move independently for a smooth ride. Further, the futuristic concept has a flexible outer shell that folds and takes shape according to the riding position and the road conditions.

Designer: Ash Thorp and Colorsponge

The post This Tesla electric bike’s frame shape-shifts form depending on riding conditions first appeared on Yanko Design.

BMW Motorrad Concept CE 02 is a skateboard-inspired stylized urban e-bike for Generation Z!




I have a hard time breaking it to the average millennial, but your time is over. The BMW Motorrad Concept CE 02 bike is aimed at the Generation Z crowd and this design encapsulates that futuristic feel in an instant!

With the backing of some exceptional concepts in the past, the German manufacturer is now turning its attention towards stylish electric vehicles, and this one is the perfect beginning. BMW Motorrad has announced the mini-bike ahead of its debut at IAA Mobility 2021 in Munich next week!

Being more than just a mere cool toy, this electric two-wheeler is a futuristic yet simple solution for urban mobility, focusing on city tours to be precise. According to the head of vehicle design, BMW Motorrad, the bike is a skateboard on wheels, developed for anyone who likes to be mobile and independent. The Concept CE 02 has a very minimalist footprint and a low center of gravity – in line with the company’s aspiration to bring a level of design innovation honed by the emotional element, and most of all, the riding fun.

The CE 02 ebike comes with an 11kW belt-driven motor that hurls the two-wheeler to a maximum speed of 56 miles per hour and a range of 90 kilometers on a single charge. According to BMW Group, the bike weighs 265 pounds in total which is lightweight and maneuverable for city riding fun.  The seat on this one is designed to give the rider the freedom to drive it in an upright or leaning forward position. In between the free space between the seat and the frame is space to keep small things secured by elastic bands. Also, the bracket under the batteries stores a skateboard and doubles as a footrest.

To display all the vital telemetry like speed or remaining battery life, the bike has a colored screen on the handlebars. To keep the minimalist theme, BMW Group chooses small black colored headlights having four LED lighting elements for enough illumination during the nighttime.

Among all this, we have to remember, this is still a concept electric bike and when it will actually be commercialized into production is not known yet. If it does, will it look like what we are seeing is also uncertain. Nonetheless, the BMW CE 02 is an urban commuter worth every rider’s time.

Designer: BMW Group




This sleek BMW i8 concept hints the revival of hybrid car revolution

Meet The Razorite, an all-electric BMW I8 sports car concept envisioning the iconic i8’s rise as a phoenix from the ashes after going out of production in 2021 and looking for a strong comeback if the German automaker brings it back to life.

BMW i8 plug-in hybrid is a name synonymous with sustainability to date since it kicked off the eco-friendly revolution back in 2014. The innovative hybrid sports car was taken out of production last year, but with a bang in 18 unique colors of the last units. A part of discontinuing the car’s production is to revive the whole hybrid philosophy at BMW and all is not lost as the car might see a comeback in coming years. The next version will be more powerful and ready to take on the dominance of Tesla in a big way.

Waiting for that resurrection I’m, and how the modern version of the iconic sports car will look like, is my deepest curiosity. Design student Harsh Sokal gives my intangible curiosity, able wings, courtesy of this BMW I8 concept. Harsh calls it The Razorite, and this all-electric sports car looks to be the worthy successor of the highly acclaimed hybrid car of the last decade – the BMW i8 in every possible aspect. The focus here is on the touring character of the car hinting at the sustainable future of circuit racing sans any impact on the already deteriorating environment.

Rather than completely revamping the visual dynamics of the i8 into an outrageous concept that defies reason, Harsh has mindfully made those cohesive changes and additions to retain the original’s slick aura. The all-carbon black paint job highlighted by the Alpine, Yokohama, AEM and ADVAN livery makes this sports car concept something that’s destined to be the dream car material – one that you desperately want to take control of of behind the wheel.

The black color schematic flows over to the fat Yokohama ADVAN performance tires – hinting towards the car’s racing DNA. This black draping is subtly matched to the yellow trims on the wheel rims, headlights, and the front grill. This revamped BMW i8 is definitely a masterpiece – raring to come alive on the streets and racing circuits with its charm to bamboozle them all!

Designer: Harsh Sokal

This self-balancing Honda electric scooter redefines futuristic urban commuting

Monowheel commuters have gained traction lately, and I personally just love the idea. That is if they are equipped with the self-balancing tech, otherwise, they are a risky affair! These single-wheeled vehicles for solo travel in the city limits are a wise idea for the future that is brimmed with vehicles (if already it isn’t bad), so why not look ahead of things. The Honda Baiku electric mobility scooter gives us a vision of the near future where one-wheeled scooters will whiz past us on the streets for a practical source of commuting.

Designed by Valencia-based designer Nacho Alfonso García, the self-balancing electric scooter on a single wheel belongs to the genre of Onewheel electric skateboard, RYNO Micro-Cycle, and many other upcoming similar designs. One advantage with Baiku is its balanced size ratio for badass riders and I’m assuming there is some space for storage inside this single-wheeled commuter. This commuter is targeted towards the next-gen crowd with a boxy design (a bit too boxy) that could have got the sharp flowing lines to be frank. Perhaps the designer wanted to infuse the Cyberpunk vibe for this creation, but anyways, I’m not complaining.

The ride has got a flat seat that retracts back into the chassis to save space while being parked for a minimum visible footprint in crowded spaces. Then comes the very high-tech display running from the top section to the lower frame. The upper section displays all the important heads-up information while the sliding section shows smartphone-connected apps like Spotify and all the vital things like phone dialer and the phone’s mirrored interface. Upfront Baiku has a big array of LED headlights to make things on the road crystal clear in the dark.

Designer: Nacho Alfonso García

 

 

New images show the majestic Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck dominating on even the toughest terrain

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Purpose-built for handling tough tasks with ease, the Honda Ridgeline EV Concept was designed to project power. Its tough, sinewy construction puts other pickup trucks to shame, and makes a case for ‘maximalism’ in automotive design. Sure, minimally designed trucks (yeah, I’m looking at you, Tesla) look alright, but using minimalism to be different feels like a cop-out. The Ridgeline is a great example of how a truck can look different without compromising on an aggressive, muscular, dominating design language.

We featured the Honda Ridgeline EV Concept a week ago (you can click here to read the original piece which got over 90,000 pageviews) and today we look at the concept in its natural habitat – anywhere except the road!

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

The Ridgeline EV concept comes from the mind of California-based Rene Garcia, a concept designer at ILM who’s previously worked on The Mandalorian, Thor: Ragnarok, The Avengers, and the Transformers anthology. Garcia began designing the vehicle as a Dakar rally truck, but gradual iterations slowly turned it into a conceptual pickup truck for Honda. Designed to handle pretty much anything you can throw at it, the EV comes with its own winch-hook on the front, a frunk behind it, suicide-style rear doors that give you access to the car’s spacious interiors, and an expandable truck-bed on the back that even comes equipped with tools and emergency medical kits.

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Against rocky terrain, it’s easy to draw parallels between the Ridgeline EV and the Warthog anti-infantry vehicle from the popular game Halo. They come from the same place of wanting to project power and assertion, and were made to operate seamlessly on any surface. The Ridgeline’s ground-clearance and large treads do wonders on rough land, and something about seeing a car leaving a massive dust cloud just gets the adrenaline rushing!

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

The Ridgeline is bulky to look at, but negative spaces in its design help cut its volume manifold, still making it look like a chiseled, mean machine. Two cutouts in the hood let you look at the top of the car’s shock absorbers, while the doors come with two sets of windows – one on the top as well as fixed windows near the legs, to help sunlight pore in. There’s a skylight built in too, and if at any point of time you need more open space, the back of the car opens up and allows the rear seats to flip 180° and face backward!

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

The car comes designed for the great outdoors. Its top allows you to add an aerodynamic roof box for extra storage (if the truck-bed isn’t enough), and the car’s front and back come dotted with lights to keep the road ahead visible, as well as allow you to be seen from a distance.

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

The Honda Ridgeline EV concept’s interiors literally put you in the lap of luxury too, no matter how deserted and inhabitable the immediate outdoors are. The pickup truck comes with immaculate leather surfacing on the seats as well as leather and wood trims on the doors and the dashboard. The dash also comes equipped with a pretty wide single-screen that covers your entire field of view from left to right. Side cameras feed video footage right into this dashboard and a rear-view camera sends its feed to a rear-view display up top. Don’t worry if you’re not in the driver’s seat or if you’re sitting shotgun. The rear seats have their own entertainment systems too, with interactive displays integrated into the backside of the front seats. The skylight in the center is accompanied by ceiling lights on either side, so you’ve got nothing to worry about when you’re driving in pitch darkness. Moreover, the seats recline fully and the back opens up into a really comfy bed if you want to set up camp anywhere. However, if you’ve got yourself a quad-bike, you could easily mount it on the back too!

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Honda Ridgeline Electric Pickup Truck Concept

Also Read: Honda’s INSANE electric pickup truck concept will have the Tesla Cybertruck begging for mercy

This is an independently-made conceptual design and the Honda logo is used for representational purposes only.

Honda’s INSANE electric pickup truck concept will have the Tesla Cybertruck begging for mercy

In a back-alley street fight, the Cybertruck looks like the edgy teenager who just lifts weights and has never done a leg-day… the Honda Ridgeline EV, on the other hand, looks like a 40-something veteran who’s returned from being stationed in the middle east for decades. Pitch the two together and it’s pretty evident who’d win in a bare-knuckle scuffle.

Something about the Ridgeline EV concept makes you want to take it seriously. It wasn’t built for fun, those windows aren’t for lobbing steel balls at… it’s inherently sinewy, bold, and is purpose-built for power-tasks.

The Ridgeline EV concept comes from the mind of California-based Rene Garcia, a concept designer at ILM who’s previously worked on The Mandalorian, Thor: Ragnarok, The Avengers, and the Transformers anthology. Garcia began designing the vehicle as a Dakar rally truck, but gradual iterations slowly turned it into a conceptual pickup truck for Honda. Designed to handle pretty much anything you can throw at it, the EV comes with its own winch-hook on the front, a frunk behind it, suicide-style rear doors that give you access to the car’s spacious interiors, and an expandable truck-bed on the back that even comes equipped with tools and emergency medical kits.

A standout feature of the car’s design is in its use of hollow spaces. The Ridgeline is bulky to look at, but negative spaces in its design help cut its volume manifold, still making it look like a chiseled, mean machine. Two cutouts in the hood let you look at the top of the car’s shock absorbers, while the doors come with two sets of windows – one on the top as well as fixed windows near the legs, to help sunlight pore in. There’s a skylight built in too, and if at any point of time you need more open space, the back of the car opens up and allows the rear seats to flip 180° and face backward!

Designer: Rene Garcia

Lyft redesign’s its e-bicycle, adding speakers, screen and improved safety features!

Back in 2018, Lyft bought CitiBike’s parent company “Motivate”, and they’ve been operating bike-sharing networks in the US ever since. Their big fleet includes traditional as well as electric pedal-assisted rides. Being the largest ebike operator in North America, Lyft used their tons of experience about how riders use the ebikes to come up with one of their own. For the past three years, Lyft has been developing an ebike that embodies the best in safety technology and low carbon footprint. Now, finally, it sees fruition in the form of this upbeat ebike.

According to Lyft‘s President and Co-Founder John Zimmer Lyft is all about “creating affordable, reliable and joyful transportation experiences – and few things create joy like riding this new ebike“. The single gear transmission ebike is built for every kind of rider with improved ergonomics and is pure joy to ride in cities – thanks to the transmission tuning for any kind of speed or road grade. It bears a very sleek form factor perfectly matched to the smooth and adaptive motor integrated into the frame. Keeping in mind the young riders, Lyft’s ebike comes with personalized features including a built-in speaker system, hydraulic brakes for consistent stopping power, on-board sensors for safety, retroreflective paint to shine in the dark and lighting effects keeping in mind urban riders demand.

The ebike now has an improved seat clamp for height adjustment to accommodate any user. The battery capacity has been bumped up to 60 miles on a single charge – thereby requiring less frequent charging. Lyft has tested the ride for thousands of hours and is going to start the public beta on the Bay Wheels fleet launching next week. Once the beta testing is successful, the ebike will be ready for the eager riders in the US – starting with the Divvy program in Chicago, later this year.

Designer: Lyft

This tiny Microlino camper trailer with a retractable kitchen is for urban adventure seekers!





Normally when you think about Overlanding, camper trailer, or living on the go – it is about powerful all-wheel drives hooked onto a trailer with all the luxurious amenities possible for a comfortable life on the road. But nobody has given much thought to living an adventurous life with a small electric car as the accomplice. A small hatchback on an even smaller footprint doesn’t come with the luxury of a highly powerful drivetrain. And when the drivetrain is electric, it is even harder to imagine towing a trailer keeping the feasible aspect in mind. Thus pulling a heavy camper trailer behind a small electric car is out of the question. Or is it?

Product designer Ozan Kayikci has come up with a mindful design for a camper tent and portable kitchen for the Microlino 2.0, a Swiss-based micro electric car to explore this unattended segment. A small electric car that can take pride in having a respectable camper-like configuration, complete with a small portable kitchen. This gives adventure seekers another option to hit the road in the small car with the assurance of a cozy place to set camp under the stars. The inflatable camper fits inside the front section of the vehicle, and when you need to set camp, it can be done in a jiffy with one end securely attached to the car. The boot section holds the mini kitchen to cook a quick meal under the star-studded sky.

Ozan’s idea is feasible for a day’s overnight trip to the woods for two people in a four-wheeler that can take on the busy streets of the city as well. It’s like an extended two-person tent for a short adventure trip every other month to freshen things up.

Designer: Ozan Kayikci

This vintage-inspired racing bike reincarnates as a fully electric, modern day two-wheeler

Board track racing was hugely popular in the early 1900s (1910s and 1920s) – as bikes with pedal-powered assistance raced on tracks hitting triple-digit speeds. Yes, the sport was utterly risky, and the crowd loved it for that reason. Eventually, as sanity prevailed, the high-risk racing culture faded out, but it has left a deep mark on the sands of time. One can deem it an integral part of two-wheeler history that will be etched in motorheads’ consciousness for a long time.

Commemorating the golden era of two-wheel motorsports from the yesteryears, Italian custom moto builder GDesign has put together a nostalgic take on the adrenaline arousing era’s racers of board track racing. Called the Elettracker, the all-electric bike evokes a century ago period – so much has changed since then, hasn’t it? The bike infuses an element of modern to the retro aesthetics in the form of a pack of electric batteries shaped like the air-cooled V-Twin engines symbolic of the track racing of that time.

The custom build doesn’t end there as the racer gets a nostalgic number plate, a tank sandwiched between the bike frame’s dual top tubes and a braced tractor-like seating embellished in brown leather. Elettracker also gets bronze inverted bar-end levers having hand-wrapped leather grips. For the wheels, GDesign managed to emulate the retro white tire look with the thin spoke wheels. To complement the retro custom build, the custom builder got the faux-painted race livery done by Arinna Crippa of Lake Design. The custom bike, in a way, traverses one to the time when anything racing on wheels was purely magical – both for the racers and the fans.

Designer: GDesign

The Lamborghini Tornado is an electric supercar running on clean energy with an even cleaner design

This isn’t the first electric Lamborghini concept we’ve seen, and it surely won’t be the last, but what’s really interesting to see is how the Lamborghini brand is perceived by designers and regular people… kind of like looking at the different Apple iPhone concepts that crop up every time there’s a rumor floating around.

It isn’t always the edgy design that makes a car a Lamborghini. The Urus is a pretty benign-looking vehicle, the Gallardo arguably had some of the smoothest surfacing for a Lamborghini. The Italian company’s DNA is arguably defined by a lot of things – all of which culminate into the car’s character which echoes speed, seriousness, and a raging bull’s fighting spirit. One could argue that the Lamborghini Tornado has all those three defining qualities. Designed by Milton Tanabe, the Lamborghini Tornado is a personal concept that aims at envisioning how Lamborghini’s form language would evolve if the car transitioned from a fuel engine to an electric powertrain. Given that electric cars are usually perceived as ‘cleaner’ than gas-guzzling automobiles, it’s fitting that the Tornado comes with clean surfacing along with an edgy, bordering-on-low-poly design. The car’s triangular headlights are a major contributing factor to its Lamborghini-ness, sort of resembling the Aventador’s front lights, and the edge-lit inverted Y shaped lights instantly remind me of the hybrid-engine-powered Lamborghini Sian.

The car’s side profile has the distinct continuous swoop often seen with most Lamborghini cars, and two butterfly doors give access to the two-seater interior. The Tornado concept comes with a black paint job – a conscious decision that allows its black tinted glasses to merge together with the obsidian-black body, creating an almost monolithic design. The car even features a tinted glass fender/tail, which extends outwards like a lip on the rear, creating the impression that the car’s speeding forward, causing a motion blur. My only real gripe with the Tornado concept is its taillight-design, which looks more Citroen-ish than what you’d expect from a Lamborghini. Aside from that slight identity crisis, it does definitely add to the Tornado’s overall lean, mean, and clean aesthetic!

Designer: Milton Tanabe