Cloud-shaped sugar cubes comes with magnetic grinder to regulate your intake

People have now become more conscious about their sugar intake given that diabetes and other related diseases have become much more prevalent. There are a lot of sugar alternatives and zero-calorie sugar options out there but sometimes, you still need something more than just that. Also, these sugar cube alternatives don’t always melt in iced coffee easily so some go to syrups or powders which are not always still the best options. So a sugar cube that can dissolve in anything and is still zero calories would probably be welcomed by those still needing a little sugar in their life.

Designer: Younghyun Kim and js C

Snowy is a cloud-shaped sugar “cube” that is packaged in a jar with the term “0 Kal” so that you won’t forget that it is the healthy kind of sugar. The playful shape is not just to make it fun but it also serves a purpose if you want to use the additional feature of the jar. There’s a magnet grinder included so holding a cloud is better than just a sugar cube or ball. The grinder is there so you can control how much sugar you want to put not just in your coffee but on your other food that you want to sweeten up.

They say the sugar cloud is also easily dissolvable in iced coffee if that’s the way you want to drink your coffee that way. However whether you drop it directly in your iced coffee or you use the grinder to be able to “shred” it onto your ice and therefore dissolve quickly, that is unclear. But either way, it is a better alternative to what’s currently in the market. And being able to control how much sugar you are able to put in your drinks or food is always a good thing.

Packaging it in a see-through jar with the label of 0 Kal and Stevia clearly visible as well is also a good idea as not only is it informative, it also shows off the design of the cubes themselves. The white cover and grinder adds to the minimalist and soft look of the sugar clouds. It’s a nice piece of kitchen accessory to have in your personal kitchen or at your coffee shop.

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Tiny cooking appliance can help you cook for one

A few years ago, most ads and marketing efforts for cooking appliances are mostly for families, specifically mothers. But now that we’re seeing a growing population of single people living on their own and cooking for themselves, we’re seeing a shift not just in the marketing but in the actual products being made for this specific market. We’re also seeing appliances now becoming more conscious about the effect on the health of those using them.

Designer: Yifeeling Design Lab

This latest product concept from Yifeeling is all about making cooking for yourself a part of your daily “ritual” and not just a chore you have to get through. Minepot looks like a food processor at first glance but it actually seems to be an air fryer or food fryer type of appliance. It is noticeably smaller than other similar kitchen tools and it is designed that way so that you not only cook for one but you are also able to have food intake that’s just right for you.

The design inspiration for this concept is to use hazy and mellow colors and in the renders it ends up as mint green but there also seems to be a light yellow version as well. The part where the food is cooked looks to be opaque or semi-transparent which should give you a good view of what’s being cooked inside. The idea is for this cooking or heating appliance to be part of your cooking and eating ritual especially as you’re preparing and eating just for yourself.

As one of those single people who live alone, cooking for one can often be a challenge. So having an appliance like this may solve a bit of the issues faced. Although in my case, it’s really more of an it’s-easier-to-order-out-than-cook type of thing and no cooking device concept can probably solve that, at least for now.

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Top 10 architectural picks of June 2022

From quaint wooden cabins to floating mansions – the world of architecture is always thriving and evolving! It is anything, BUT boring. The scope of architectural structures today is unlimited, and it’s evident in the arsenal of builds we featured on YD, in the month of June! From mushroom-shaped duplex villas to provide the ultimate glamping experience to a kinetic glasshouse in the middle of the Silk Route Garden – we were delighted by the influx and variety of designs we got to witness, and present to you guys!  And, we’ve curated the best of the lot for you! These mesmerizing designs will challenge what you believe are the boundaries and norms of modern-day architecture, widening not only your vision for it but also providing you with massive inspiration. Enjoy!

1. The Mushroom Villa

The Mushroom Villa is a wonderfully idyllic holiday home that gives you a cozy space to unwind in.

Why is it noteworthy?

Located right in the midst of nature, the villa is made entirely from bamboo (one of architect Thilina Liyanage’s signature materials) with terracotta tiles on the roof to keep you cool during the days. Practically cut off from civilization, the villa’s roofs also come dotted with solar panels that help power your glamping experience!

What we like

  • A mushroom-cap-shaped roof on top comes with 14 solar panels that power the villa

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

2. The Slope House

The Slope House from the 3D visualizer Milad Eshtiyaghi is an untraditional A-frame cabin that employs biophilic design inside and out. 3D visualizer and international architect Milad Eshtiyaghi has long been drawn to escapist hideaways perched on rugged, seaside cliffs and isolated cabins envisioned beneath the Northern Lights. Today, he turns his gaze to tiny cabins. A bit more quaint than treacherous, Eshtiyaghi’s latest 3D visualization finds an angular, timber cabin nestled atop an idyllic hillside somewhere in the rainforests of Brazil.

Why is it noteworthy?

Dubbed the Slope House, the timber cabin maintains a signature triangular frame that’s a thoughtful twist on the conventional A-frame cabin. Defined by two modules, one internal volume hosts the cabin’s bedroom while the other keeps the home’s main living spaces, like the dining area, kitchen, and den. The tiny cabin from Eshtiyaghi is envisioned propped atop a truss system that was specifically chosen to minimize the home’s impact on the preexisting landscape.

What we like

  • A biophilic design style has been integrated into the cabin’s interior spaces
  • Natural plants have been added inside the house as a small garden

What we dislike

  • The theme and form of the home may be a bit too eccentric for some

3. The Maldives Floating City

The Maldives Floating City is the world’s first of its kind with thousands of houses and complete governmental support. Houses within this unique floating framework are open not just to Maldivians, but also to the international community who can invest in residential permits and own houses within the city.

Why is it noteworthy?

Uniquely enough, every home will be a waterfront home, given the city’s coral-inspired layout, allowing all residents to be just mere feet away from the pristine waters of the Indian Ocean. The city, with its 5,000 houses will also have hotels, shops, and restaurants, and will be connected to Malé via water-based transport (the floating city is just 10 minutes away)

What we like

  • The city will rely on green/blue energy and a smart grid will help distribute power between units
  • Features self-sustainable facilities

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

4. Heatherwick Glasshouse

The Woolbeding Gardens in West Sussex is one such place where you can now see the Silk Route Garden, a 12-step journey celebrating the ancient trading route between Asia and Europe during the 2nd century BC. And on the edge of that garden, you’ll see a jewel-like structure that will open up as a crown but is actually a glasshouse.

Why is it noteworthy?

The kinetic Heatherwick Glasshouse is the focal point of the Silk Route Garden with its ten steel sepals and its glass and aluminum facade. During the summer, the glasshouse will open up through its hydraulic mechanism which takes four minutes to be fully open. This allows the plants inside to be exposed to the sun and to natural ventilation and also for the visitors to see the various subtropical trees and shrubs inside. But during winters or colder weather, the Glasshouse will remain closed to protect the subtropical species inside.

What we like

  • Inspired by ornamental Victorian terrariums or sealable containers with soil and plants
  • The glasshouse opens up through its hydraulic mechanism which takes four minutes to be fully open

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

5. OM-1

Don’t you just wish sometimes that you could “build” a house online and then order it just the way you like it? Well, now you actually can to some extent as a company called Dimensions X is aiming to be the Tesla of prefabricated homes. Plus, just like the environmentally friendly car company whose model they are following, the houses they will be offering homes that are energy efficient and will offer less carbon footprint.

Why is it noteworthy?

Australian entrepreneur Oscar Martin partnered with architect Peter Stutchbury to create a company that can offer people their prefabricated homes with a few clicks on their website. The process isn’t yet as simple as ordering a Tesla but they do have an online configurator that will tell you how much it will cost you as soon as you build your prefab home and make certain changes to it. There are modules and elements that you can modify to make it your own.

What we like

  • An energy-efficient home with a small carbon footprint
  • You can choose things like the length and size of the entire house as well as placements of doors and windows, finishes, orientations, and other elements that you can personalize

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

6. A Pavilion

When you hear the word pavilion, you probably think about something that’s huge and grand. You get visions of big events being held inside a dome or some other interestingly shaped structure that can fit hundreds or even thousands of people. But this luminescent and “unquestionably small” structure was intentionally built to be a tiny, portable booth that can be transported wherever it is needed. Still the designers chose to name it “A Pavilion”.

Why is it noteworthy?

The structure is made from a three-directional grid of steel T-sections but the whole thing is covered in translucent glass, hence giving it the look of a greenhouse. Even the roof is made from the same kind of glass so you get a singular space and look for the entire thing. But it does have some chamfered edges, giving off a sort-of thatched roof look. Inside it’s also a bit different as the floor is made from timber, a departure from the overall glass look of the A Pavilion.

What we like

  • Can be transported where it’s needed with just a small truck
  • When the sun sets down, it seemingly glows because of its translucent glass skin

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

7. ArkHaus

ArkHaus is a livable, multi-story luxury yacht that will be floating in Miami’s Biscayne Bay.

Why is it noteworthy?

It is the first solar-powered floating mansion with solar awnings paired with electric propulsion and also has a rainwater harvesting system to make it a sustainable, 4,350-square feet yacht. The materials used to build it are probably not that eco-friendly so we can’t really call it a green floating house.

What we like

  • Solar-powered + sustainable mansion
  • Looks like it’s really floating on the water but it actually has four hydraulic spuds that raise it out of the water so it will still be stable and not be impacted so much by the wave

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

8. Batyrkhan’s yurts

Designed as a minimalist reinterpretation of the iconic yurt found in the steppes of Central Asia, these futuristic housing solutions are a part of designer Batyrkhan Bayaliev’s Kyrgyzstan 2122 visual project.

Why is it noteworthy?

A rather modern reinterpretation of the traditional yurt, Batyrkhan’s yurts are cuboidal instead of cylindrical and are permanent concrete structures instead of tents. As a hat-tip to the yurt’s iconic design, however, these modern establishments have frosted glass windows in the shape of a yurt, capturing the iconography of the traditional tent. Batyrkhan’s modern yurts are spacious and have two levels for accommodating more people.

What we like

  • The yurts are like modern-day igloos
  • Protects the residents from the harsh weather of the cold landscape outside

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

9. Raus’ Cabin

If you live in Berlin or a city near the German capital, you can avail of Raus’ service which lets you book secluded cabins whose locations are revealed to you once you’ve booked them. Their newest cabin design is as compact as they come but with a bit of a charred twist.

Why is it noteworthy?

This new compact cabin was built on the grounds of Wehrmühle Biesenthal which is just an hour away from Berlin. The 193-square-foot cabin is made from charred timber, giving it a dark and worn look that lets it blend with the dark tree trunks that surround it. It actually sits in the middle of a forest with meadows, fields, and even a small river surrounding it. You are basically escaping to nature but with all the conveniences of a stylish cabin to retreat to.

What we like

  • Self-sufficient cabins
  • Solar panels to provide the space with green energy

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

10. Under

Snohetta Under Underwater Restaurant in Norway Europe

Under - Europe’s First Underwater Restaurant

Aptly named “Under” for obvious reasons, this one-of-a-kind restaurant is something that can beat Krusty Krab. Of course, there’s really no such thing, but fans of the cartoon show will probably remember the fictional fast-food restaurant when they first learn about Under.

Why is it noteworthy?

This one aims to fully integrate the structure into a marine environment, and over time, we know it will happen, and there will be a generation that won’t notice it’s man-made. Designed by Norweigan architectural and design firm Snøhetta , the Under restaurant is made to provide an extraordinary experience to the diners and guests.

What we like

  • It boasts a large eleven-meter-wide and 3.4-meter-tall horizontal window where diners can enjoy the beautiful panoramic view of the seabed

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

The post Top 10 architectural picks of June 2022 first appeared on Yanko Design.

Unique bottle opener concept is inspired by Chinese architecture

Most people have a lot of tools and devices in their kitchen that is mainly functional and not that decorative. All you need anyway is a knife to slice your veggies, a can opener to open your cans, a coffee maker to make your elixirs, and a bottle opener for your favorite bottle of beer. But there are product designers who will tell you that it’s possible to have both form and function. Well, at least we get a lot of those as product concepts and some of them even become actual products.

Designer: YUUE Design Studio

The Viiu Bottle Opener is a product concept for a tool in your kitchen that will mean more than just something to open a bottle of cola, juice, or beer. Normally you will just get a handle and a head whose main job is to just open that bottle with a crown. This time around you don’t get a handle but rather some decorative objects that will give you a pretty unique way of getting those drinks ready for you. At first glance, they look like some pieces of baubles or knick-knacks lying around but they do serve a very important purpose.

The design is inspired by window grill patterns, specifically those from classic Chinese architecture. There are three shapes featured: one hexagonal, one rectangular, and one with a semi-circular design. All of them have these patterns that may remind you of windows in old houses if you live in such a place influenced by this kind of architecture. While there are no handles to grip while opening a bottle, the grill design can help you with the grip problem.

I’m not sure though if something like this can be useful when opening bottle caps but the product renders seem to indicate it can fulfill its function. Well if it doesn’t work, at least you’ll have something pretty-looking lying around, maybe not in your kitchen but in your shelf housing all of your cute but useless knick-knacks.

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Dotti cleaning tools use inspired designs to make cleaning feel less like a chore

Cleaning might sound like a drag, but there’s no reason your cleaning tools have to be as well.

As if the chore of cleaning up, even after yourself, wasn’t already an uninspiring idea, the thought of using tools designed more for mass-production than actual cleaning doesn’t help lighten the load either. Sure, you could think of expensive designer products that look beautiful or interesting, but what are the chances that you’d actually use them without feeling guilty for having sullied their immaculate surfaces. Good product design doesn’t mean something has to be artistic or lavish, just that they actually get the job done in the best way possible, all while looking good, too. That’s pretty much what these cleaning tools promise, improving your cleaning mood and efficiency by looking good and cleaning well.

Designers: Will Soper and Martyn Long

Click Here to Buy Now: $89 $119 ($30 off). Hurry, only 2/10 left!

Meet the Dotti Super Scrubber™ and Dotti Best Broom & Dustpan™ – Engineered for ultimate comfort, performance and style.

You probably take your cleaning tools like brooms and sponges for granted, brushing them off as disposable items that can become too disgusting to keep around after a while. It might have never occurred to you, however, that it might be that attitude and outlook that actually worsen your mood when cleaning, making it feel even more burdensome and undesirable. That is why Dotti tries to reimagine what it would be like if you had good and beautiful cleaning tools that delight and work well. You might not want to throw them away so quickly, and, fortunately, you won’t have to because Dotti is made to last.

The Dotti Best Broom & Dustpan™ – Carefully engineered with an antibacterial silicone bristle broom that effectively traps small and large debris.

The Dotti Best Broom and Dustpan are a dynamic duo that keeps your home spick and span, literally. The Best Broom’s antibacterial silicone bristles are like death traps for debris, big and small alike, while the ergonomic Dustpan is designed so that you won’t have to break your back while cleaning. Set your foot down on dirt and never bend to its level ever again. The minimalist design of these tools easily sets them apart from their mass-produced cousins so that you might not even want to hide this pair inside some closet, leaving them out in the open for everyone to see and admire.

The Dotti Super Scrubber™ – Long-lasting, non-scratch, odor-free and does not change shape or discolor.

The Dotti Super Scrubber is similarly appealing in its appearance but rough on grime. Antibacterial silicone makes short work of dishes and table crumbs while making sure their odors don’t stick around to ruin your day. The ergonomic design of the dish not only makes it a pleasure to hold but also to behold as well. Forget all you know about disgusting, soggy, and stinky sponges when you grasp the Super Scrubber and take cleaning problems into your own hands.

Cleaning tools aren’t exactly what many would consider attractive objects, but Dotti throws all conventions out the window. In addition to their beautiful minimalist designs, they also come in different color options to match your home, your kitchen, or your style. These are definitely tools you’ll want to keep around for as long as you possibly can, so it’s a good thing that you actually can. Dotti tools are meant to last a lot longer than their common counterparts, which helps reduce the compounding effects of disposable products on the environment.

Cleaning is already a chore, so why subject yourself to the pain of using tools that don’t inspire or even do their jobs well. With Dotti, you can feel good not only after the job is done but also while cleaning with a stylish and effective tool in your hand. And it all starts at around $89 for a complete kit of the Best Broom and Dustpan tag team and the Super Scrubber sponge.

Click Here to Buy Now: $89 $119 ($30 off). Hurry, only 2/10 left!

The post Dotti cleaning tools use inspired designs to make cleaning feel less like a chore first appeared on Yanko Design.

Vaso Gato minimalist and lightweight vase appears as if floating in the air

VASO GOTA Vase Product Design

A vase has one primary purpose: to hold something—it could be a single stem of a flower or a stalk of a plant, water or wine, or just about anything small you want to display. You can see at least one vase in most households, but you see many of them in restaurants as fancy decorations. No matter how you use a vase, such must complement a room’s aesthetics and personality if it is to stay in your environment. Good thing the vase can come in different forms, shapes, sizes, and textures so anyone can experiment with the design or get one that suits him. A vase may only have a few functions, but it can offer big things to people, especially if you put pretty flowers or plants, as the sight can help reduce stress, boost your mood, and for some people, help physically heal.

Designer: Maurício Coelho

Vaso Gota Drop Vase

Vaso Gota Drop Vase

Who wouldn’t want to use a vase as a decoration at home when this small object can do wonders to your mood? Designed by furniture and product designer Maurício Coelho, the Vaso Gota is an intelligently- designed vase that is functional and peaceful—like holding a flower or a plant and the ability to soothe the soul. The vase system is made of different materials—steel and glass—so it offers a balanced yet contrasting energy to anyone who can adapt to many different kinds of atmosphere, ambiance, cultures, and people.

Vaso Gota Drop Vase

The Vaso Gota (Drop Vase) features two parts: (1) the metal stand with its curves working as the frame and the vase holder; and (2) the glass vase in different shapes. The shape of the stand (frame) allows the vase to appear as if floating from the floor, but we find it interesting it can carry the vase without tipping. It’s not exactly magic because the exact design of both ends carries the weight of the vase, supporting any shape of the glass vase available. As for the shapes of the glass vases, there are three: two are cones but one is taller and slimmer, and another one shaped like an elongated teat of a baby’s pacifier.

Vaso Gota Drop Vase

The Vaso Gato is a minimalist creation that will look great on any surface or corner of the room. The available vases come in timeless designs, but they cannot stand independently. They remind us of those glass beakers used in science experiments but now with their own stand, so it’s looking like you’re about to start a new scientific discovery. The metal stand is available in either white or black, looking thin yet strong and lightweight.

Vaso Gota Drop Vase

Maurício Coelho isn’t a stranger to us as we have featured his previous designs like the unique-looking Chaise Espinhal chaise lounge and the Lightning Chair that looks ready to charge you anytime. This Brazilian designer is also a 3D artist who comes up with furniture pieces that are functional, intuitive, and personal. Most of his works are sofas and chairs, but we have also seen other smaller ones like the lamps and the vases. Coelho knows what he is doing for the home and furniture world because every design presented can go into production and be released in the market.

Vaso Gota Drop Vase

Vaso Gota Drop Vase

VASO GOTA

Vaso Gota Drop Vase

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This wonder box lets you easily grow nature’s miracle food right inside your home

Building your diet and your life around plant-forward meals isn’t exactly easy, especially when you take special care in selecting where the ingredients come from or how they’re harvested. In an ideal world, we’d all grow our own organic food in our pesticide-free yards, but few actually have the luxury of free space in the first place. Growing vegetables and herbs indoors is actually gaining momentum these days, but those aren’t the only things you can cultivate inside your house. Mushrooms are relatively easier to grow, especially indoors, but getting the conditions right isn’t that straightforward and painless as well. Fortunately, Shrooly has your back and makes growing mushrooms not only dead simple but also interesting and attractive as well.

Designer: Shrooly

Click Here to Buy Now: $293 $438 (33% off). YD readers get free growing pods worth $50. Hurry, only 5 left!

Although some people might balk after learning about its classification (spoiler alert: it’s a fungus), mushrooms are one of nature’s mysteries and wonders. They can pop up almost anywhere, especially in dark environments, which has become the origin of some idiomatic expressions. Not only are the edible variants great sources of nutrition and flavor, they can also have therapeutic or even medicinal benefits if you know how to grow and use them. Despite their ubiquity, getting your hands on quality mushrooms is ironically difficult unless you grow them, and this unassuming minimalist appliance makes that happen almost instantly.

Shrooly makes growing mushrooms as easy as putting a prepared pod inside the box and turning it on. While many indoor farms take weeks to harvest your produce, Shrooly can grow mushrooms in days. The humble appliance takes all of the guesswork and monitoring out of the equation so that you can just watch your mushrooms grow day by day. And when you yourself have grown into some sort of a mushroom expert, you can easily take control of the whole process as well through Shrooly’s mobile app. Whether you want more humidity or more light, the settings are just a few flicks and taps away.

For Complete Beginners – It is a smart device that allows you to enjoy every aspect of the mushroom-growing process with little to no effort.

Grow Your Own Superfood at Home – Shiitake, Reishi, Lion’s mane, or Enoki, are just some of the numerous mushroom varieties you can easily grow at home.

Part of Shrooly’s magic is the ready-to-grow pods available for purchase. A single block can grow two harvests of mushrooms, which are often three times more than what would have been able to buy from the market. Presuming, of course, you can even buy the mushrooms you want from the market, which often isn’t the case. In contrast, Shrooly pods offer a wide variety of edible mushrooms, including pink oyster and shitake, as well as medicinal breeds like Reishi, Turkey Tail, and Lion’s Mane. The latter group is definitely not something you’ll be able to pick from a supermarket shelf. And going with the sustainability theme, the pod blocks are fully organic, pesticide-free, and made from 100% recycled materials.

Shrooly also has one other special trait that isn’t directly related to the use of mushrooms. The box itself is beautiful, with a minimalist design that will fit anywhere at home, even in the middle of your living room. Its large window is made to showcase the mushroom that grows bigger each day that passes, sparking interest and anticipation. It will definitely be a conversation starter that could tide your family and friends over to a healthier diet.

Convincing people to try more plant-forward diets requires giving them scents and flavors they never knew they wanted and making it easier to acquire these sources as well. Why should you settle for frozen mushrooms which came from who knows where and were grown with questionable methods when you can grow your own batch in seven days and have more than twice the amount? With Shrooly, you can get all the mushrooms you need when you need them, even the ones you can’t even buy in groceries, and all for a $299 starting price that quickly pays for itself in savings.

Click Here to Buy Now: $293 $438 (33% off). YD readers get free growing pods worth $50. Hurry, only 5 left!

The post This wonder box lets you easily grow nature’s miracle food right inside your home first appeared on Yanko Design.

Fadi baby bowl teaches little tots self-feeding

FADI Learning Tableware for Toddlers

Teaching kids proper table manners begins at home so it is mainly the responsibility of the parents or guardians or whoever is the primary caregiver. Knowing the proper tableware is a good start but what is more important is that children know how to feed themselves. Many will probably agree that knowing how a tool or tableware works is just half the battle because kids need to learn how to self-feed after some time. Allowing a baby or a toddler to feed himself acknowledges his power to make his own choices even at an early age. It’s just food, alright, but the act is good for a child’s development as it also aids in developing hand-and-eye coordination, hand and finger strength, and fine motor skills. This is true in most cases, but it can be observed that there are toddlers having a hard time learning self-control if they are still spoon-fed.

Designer: Jian Lu

FADI Learning Tableware for Kids

Solutions for such a dilemma are available, but everything is not absolute, because what we are offered is only supplemental to what the adults should teach the children. Fadi enters the scene to teach a little person to self-feed while helping the adults and reducing the cleaning time for parents after a messy meal. Of course, toddlers will still be frustrated, but the Fadi tableware is expected to assist both the child in self-feeding and the parent in caring for the little one.

FADI Learning Tableware

FADI Learning Tableware Features

The Fadi baby tableware was recognized at the 2021 Good Design Awards for its thoughtful design, features, and aesthetics. Designed by Jian Lu, the patented learning tableware set is meant to allow a more efficient self-feeding and easier cleanup. A toddler’s utensil set should not be complicated and must be easier to use; however, some styles available in the market are not exactly helpful.

FADI Learning Tableware Advantage

FADI Learning Tableware Benefits

Taiwanese industrial designer Jian Lu understands the need for simple-looking yet functional tableware because feeding a kid is not really easy, so he designed the tableware with efficiency and comfort in mind. The whole set actually includes different pieces: the toddler bowl with a lopsided design and a suction, a standable bent spoon with a curved handle, and a TPU cover. The suction keeps the bowl from slipping, the bent spoon is to make things easier for the toddler to carry food, while the spoon with its bigger handle is for easier grabbing.  The design of the Fadi allows a more enjoyable mealtime experience for everyone, and after a delightful meal, carrying out and washing are also easier.

FADI Learning Tableware Concept

This concept tableware is mainly a baby bowl that can teach the baby to learn to self-feed. The bowl won’t slip or fall off because of the strong suction, so even if the baby wants to release it, the bowl won’t fall. The Fadi tableware offers many other thoughtful functions so every mealtime can be enjoyable for the tiny tot. A happy baby means a happy mommy—so yes, what parent wouldn’t want to have this?

FADI Learning Tableware for Children

FADI Learning Tableware Details

FADI Learning Tableware Design

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This wireless speaker concept looks like an eerie UFO made of fabric

This speaker definitely sets itself apart not just from other speakers but from everything else in your room as well.

There is a growing trend these days to design or at least conceptualize speakers as something other than looking like a conventional speaker. Smart speakers try to blend in with the rest of the room decor to make them look more appealing as virtual hubs of smart homes. Others have tried to take that even further and disguised speakers either as everyday objects or more attractive decorative pieces that call your attention more because of their beauty than their functionality. This Bluetooth speaker is definitely part of the latter crowd and might even take things to the extreme, looking like nothing that would resemble a living room piece, yet, at the same time, is mesmerizing in its almost alien-like appearance.

Designers: Qi Liu, Shuang’er Wang

The designers say that the speaker’s form was meant to inspire images of floating and flying, and whether intentional or not, nothing calls to mind those thoughts better than a UFO. Although it’s not in the conventional saucer shape alien vessels are always presumed to take, the bulging top and bottom surfaces do resemble the same form from certain angles. The fact that the speaker is meant to be held up by a thin metal stand that makes it look like it is floating serves to reinforce that association.

Extraterrestrial references aside, there is indeed something visually intriguing about this Bluetooth speaker concept. It is mostly covered in a fabric-like material, save for the metallic filling sandwiched between the covers, giving it a more familiar and human flavor that contrasts with its alien shape. The soft material and soft curves are supposed to represent flowing water and the pleasant sound it makes. It also looks like the sine waves associated with sound, again perhaps an accidental detail that the designers didn’t intentionally think of.

Fabric material, especially one on display in such a lofty manner, is just begging to be touched, and the speaker concept actually encourages that. In fact, it’s the only way you can physically control the speaker, though it’s probably possible to control it remotely with a connected smartphone. A somatosensory camera on top recognizes gestures, like the direction of a swipe, and translates them into actions like changing the track or changing the volume.

1

The design doesn’t make any mention of the technical aspects of a speaker, like where the speakers, tweeters, and woofers would be located to maximize the flow of sound. Judging by the way it hovers above a platform, one can presume that a downward-firing speaker for the bass, while mids and treble could escape from the gap between the fabric-covered sides, which could compress the sound a bit too much. Having a top-firing speaker would probably be inconvenient and uncomfortable for people trying to adjust the speaker’s settings without having to feel the vibrations hitting their hands.

In terms of trying to design a speaker that inspires images of floating and flying, this Bluetooth speaker concept definitely checks that box, especially with the stand that holds it up and prevents it from wobbling on a surface. That it also conjures up images of unidentified flying objects might have been an accident or something that only certain cultures or people will get. The design pays special attention to the look and the feel of the speaker to create a striking yet comforting product, but it also leaves some questions open regarding the technical details that will actually make it work as a speaker.

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Top 10 cabins that are the ultimate break you need from your hectic city life

Cabins have been a relaxing and quintessential getaway option for everyone for ages galore. They’re the ultimate safe haven in the midst of nature, if you simply want to get away from your hectic city lives, and unwind. If you want a simple and minimal vacation, that lets you truly connect with nature, without any of the materialistic luxuries most of us have gotten accustomed to, then a cabin retreat is the answer for you! And, we’ve curated some beautiful and super comfortable cabins that’ll be the perfect travel destination for you. From a self-sufficient cabin that is a green retreat in the forest to a sustainable and self-build Climber’s cabin – these mesmerizing and surreal cabins are the ultimate retreat, you’ve been searching for!

1. The Slope House

The Slope House from the 3D visualizer Milad Eshtiyaghi is an untraditional A-frame cabin that employs biophilic design inside and out. 3D visualizer and international architect Milad Eshtiyaghi has long been drawn to escapist hideaways perched on rugged, seaside cliffs and isolated cabins envisioned beneath the Northern Lights. Today, he turns his gaze to tiny cabins. A bit more quaint than treacherous, Eshtiyaghi’s latest 3D visualization finds an angular, timber cabin nestled atop an idyllic hillside somewhere in the rainforests of Brazil.

Why is it noteworthy?

Dubbed the Slope House, the timber cabin maintains a signature triangular frame that’s a thoughtful twist on the conventional A-frame cabin. Defined by two modules, one internal volume hosts the cabin’s bedroom while the other keeps the home’s main living spaces, like the dining area, kitchen, and den. The tiny cabin from Eshtiyaghi is envisioned propped atop a truss system that was specifically chosen to minimize the home’s impact on the preexisting landscape.

What we like

  • A biophilic design style has been integrated into the cabin’s interior spaces
  • Natural plants have been added inside the house as a small garden

What we dislike

  • The theme and form of the home may be a bit too eccentric for some

2. Jacobschang Architecture’s tree house

This minimalist 360-square-foot cabin is supported by the trees surrounding it and was constructed using a minimal budget and with most of the work to be done above ground. The most expensive part of the structure is the three 8×8 steel-tube pivot doors which were actually created off-site and installed together with dual-insulated glass panels.

Why is it noteworthy?

The framing of the cabin uses standard nominal lumber, while the perimeter uses engineered wood beams. In order to balance the house on the upslope corners and between the two trees, they used Sonotube footings and Garnier Limbs to distribute the weight of the entire structure. Although some of the eastern pines were cut down, they were used to create the exterior and interior boards of the treehouse after they were milled and kiln-dried.

What we like

  • The exterior boards are coated with Scandinavian pine tar to give them extra protection
  • Let’s you relive your childhood dream of having a treehouse

What we dislike

  • You can’t live there for a long period of time

3. The ZeroCabin

Two sisters in Chile got the ZeroCabin crew to help create their dream retreat in a forest in the Lake District. The cabin faces the sea on the east and then on the west, you can see a 70-meter tall hill so you get a perfect view either way.

Why is it noteworthy?

They designed the north facade to have open windows and expanded the east facade to allow more sun to illuminate the house obliquely. And since the area has extreme humidity during the winter, they elevated the cabin 1.5 meters above the ground. The 1,184-square-foot cabin has three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a kitchen and living area on the ground floor, and a loft on the third floor.

What we like

  • This ZeroCabin Krul uses timber as a frame for the entire structure but with structural insulated panels with pulverized cardboard
  • The cabin is built to be green and so it uses a two-kilowatt solar system for its electrical needs and a five-cycle system that collects rainwater for its water needs

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

4. Buster

Buster is located in Matamata, just a couple of hours away from Auckland, New Zealand. You will be able to hear the sound of spring river water flowing around you as you’re surrounded by trees, stones, valleys, and basically the joys of nature. It’s located below the Kaimai Range “amongst ancient native bush and farmland”. It is a tiny home perfect for one person or a couple who wants to temporarily or even permanently live in such an area and to have something that is built sustainably and with the environment and your comfort in mind.

Why is it noteworthy?

Instead of being made from timber, it uses black corrugate as it will last longer and can survive all the different kinds of weather that the area experiences. They also used plywood to bring “a sense of warmth” to the house and is in fact what is also used in the traditional kiwi trampers huts, giving you even more of a local feel but with modern conveniences. It’s a pretty good combination, having a more natural lodging but using sustainable technology and devices to give you comfort and function.

What we like

  • Buster is powered by GridFree solar panels
  • The house is oriented to the north so that it will be able to maximize the light during the summer and even during the winter

What we dislike

  • The solar energy is only enough to power a small fridge, and lights, and to charge your smartphones

5. Air Bee & Bee

Cutely called Air Bee & Bee (and listed on Air BnB), the house, or more specifically, the self-standing room, is located on an olive farm in a village called Grottole. The room fits two people, and the house itself has an exterior that looks like a honeycomb.

Why is it noteworthy?

Aside from just having a bee theme, there are actually nine apiaries or beehive boxes surrounding you. There is even one of those boxes hanging from the ceiling near your bed. So if you’re a bit scared of bees, then this is definitely not somewhere you should go to.

What we like

  • To give you the complete bee experience, the owner, who is also the beekeeper, will give you lessons about the importance of bees
  • The goal, aside from having a cool Air BnB listing, is to spread more awareness about bees

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

6. The Beach Cabin

Part cabin part conservatory, the Beach Cabin on the Baltic Sea by Peter Kuczia offers the most stunning panoramic views of the beach. This small gastronomy facility located in north Poland near Gdansk boasts of a simple form that fits naturally into the beach environment but stands out thanks to its bold design.

Why is it noteworthy?

The cabin comes in two parts – an enclosed space on the side, and a vast, open living/dining area that provides shelter along with an abundance of natural light. This dining area is further split into two, with one half made in the traditional style of a cabin, while the other half is constructed entirely out of glass. This glass facade gives onlookers an absolutely sublime view of the ocean, the shoreline, and even the sky above!

What we like

  • It literally floats above the sand
  • Offers the most beautiful panoramic view

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

7. The Climber’s Cabin

The Climbers Cabin Designers

The Climbers Cabin

We have seen Several interesting units, but we believe more well-designed cabins will be introduced. The latest on our radar is The Climber’s Cabin by AR Design Studio. As described, its primary purpose is as a space for children and as a guest cabin for when you want to entertain friends and family.

Why is it noteworthy?

The Climber’s Cabin is situated near a stream and a woodland, adding to the adventure experience. The initial plan for the cabin was for it to function as ancillary space for the client’s house. The idea was that the cabin would be built quickly without any complex construction methods. Every step was supposed to be straightforward, so anyone could easily understand and follow. Construction should also be done using sustainable materials sourced locally. The project was actually born during those early months of lockdowns due to the pandemic.

What we like

  • The A-shaped roof was optimized to allow a mezzanine
  • Inside The Climber’s Cabin, interior finishes are made of used and upcycled boards

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

8. Container House

Inspired by their interest in customized American cars, Tham’s clients felt a connection to the DIY nature of turning shipping containers into modular homes. In addition to the natural connection they felt to shipping container architecture, the couple chose to build with shipping containers for their sustainable appeal, flexibility, and prefabricated structural integrity. Generally speaking, all of this allows architects to build shipping container homes quickly, but that’s not always the case. For Container House, it took just about three years to reach completion. Built on a steep cliffside, Container House’s chosen location brought some challenges with it.

Why is it noteworthy?

Container House is a modular family residence near Stockholm, Sweden that’s built from eight shipping containers. Shipping containers give new meaning to modular home design. Chosen for its structural integrity and prefabricated build, the shipping container is a sustainable and long-lasting choice for home builders. Måns Tham, architect and founder of Måns Tham Arkitektkontor, recently finished work on a multi-year, shipping container project that’s home to a family of five. Completed with eight 20′ and 40′ disused high-cube shipping containers, the residence gives rise to a geometric monolith posed on a steep lot near a lake outside Stockholm.

What we like

  • Inspired by customized American cars
  • A single shipping container functions as a lookout level for residents to bask in the views of the rugged cliffside and nearby lake

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

9. The River House

A New Zealand-based architect was able to build his dream home for his family with the idea that their holiday home, known as a “kiwi bach” is not just a space but also turns the outside landscape into an extension of it. He found a space in the 450-resident regional township of Taupiri, an hour south of Auckland, overlooking the Waikato River and the Hakarimata mountains, and turned it into the River House. For those that grew up in cities and want to escape the bustle, this seems to be a perfect spot.

Why is it noteworthy?

The idea is to create a laid-back living kind of house and at the same time use a small footprint for both budgetary and ecological concerns. The 1,065 square feet house with a 270 square feet second floor uses two essential materials – plasterboard and pine, as well as Resene paint for the walls. These materials were painted white, while those that use aluminum or steel were painted black. The timber paneling and flooring retained their natural colors, giving the entire house a minimalist look and, at the same time, complementing the outdoor ambiance.

What we like

  • Perfect spot to escape the hustle-bustle of the city
  • A laid-back and peaceful living space

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

10. OM-1

Don’t you just wish sometimes that you could “build” a house online and then order it just the way you like it? Well, now you actually can to some extent as a company called Dimensions X is aiming to be the Tesla of prefabricated homes. Plus, just like the environmentally friendly car company whose model they are following, the houses they will be offering homes that are energy efficient and will offer less carbon footprint.

Why is it noteworthy?

Australian entrepreneur Oscar Martin partnered with architect Peter Stutchbury to create a company that can offer people their prefabricated homes with a few clicks on their website. The process isn’t yet as simple as ordering a Tesla but they do have an online configurator that will tell you how much it will cost you as soon as you build your prefab home and make certain changes to it. There are modules and elements that you can modify to make it your own.

What we like

  • Energy-efficient home with a small carbon footprint
  • You can choose things like the length and size of the entire house as well as placements of doors and windows, finishes, orientations, and other elements that you can personalize

What we dislike

  • No complaints!

The post Top 10 cabins that are the ultimate break you need from your hectic city life first appeared on Yanko Design.