Samsung-inspired TV dangles like a jeweled pendant on your wall in desired orientation

Hanging a TV set like a picture frame on the wall may seem too risky at the first glance, but if you consider that it’s a design that’s pretty tested, and it opens up the TV for a range of use case scenarios, you’re instantly intrigued!

If you have used a Samsung Series 4 LED TV, you’d relate to the fact that they came with a metal string like this one predicted for the Pendant TV. It would rest on a pulley-like mount screwed into the wall, allowing the TV set to hang like a good old picture frame.

This way of mounting a TV, for me definitely, was a far better choice than the current day mounts. It was way sleeker and held the TV set closer to the wall, unlike the brackets now used with larger display-sized televisions, which tend to protrude from the wall leaving a sizable gap between the wall and the TV. We can give it for the fact that hanging the large displays this way would be a little dicey and unstable, but the entry-level sizes, maybe even up to the 43-inch odd, can still resort to this sleeker and convenient way of hanging TVs to the wall.

That said, Pendant TV is influenced but different from the hanging mechanism Samsung has executed. Considering this conceptual TV is a result of a workshop with Samsung, we can presume the design here is influenced by the South Korean tech giant. While the marketed hanging style from Samsung actually ensured the hanging sting hid behind the display; the clean hanging layout makes the fine fabric strap visible with the Pendant TV display.

Interestingly, the Pendant TV can be hung on the wall, using an eye-pleasing hook, in either landscape or portrait orientations – facilitating you to match the display to the sort of content you’re binge-watching – just like you’d with a smartphone. What really makes me intrigued is the kind of convenience it brings to the ultimate technology Samsung has been working on. You’d remember the Sero 4K OLED TV Samsung introduced at the CES 2020. The TV automatically tips between landscape and portrait orientations to match the content user’s playing.

With a TV set like the Pendant, you’d have to make some effort to get up from the sofa and change the orientation, but the humungous cost it’ll save you is going to be worth that long walk from the couch. Besides, the Pendant TV is also versioned with an attachable kickstand, which you can connect to instantly allow the TV unit to sit on the table in either orientation. Now that’s as convenient as picking the TV from the wall and placing it on the table – no installation, mounts, or any sort of help required.

Designer: il-seop yoon

LG’s Rollable TV was just the beginning. Here’s a crazy new concept of a rolling screen that can change sizes and aspect ratios

Let’s get our terminology straight right at the very beginning – the SHIFT is an adaptive rollable TV, not just a regular rollable one. That’s just a fancy way of saying that instead of having a scroll-shaped display that sits hidden inside a small chamber and unrolls to reveal itself (like LG’s Rollable TV), the SHIFT is ‘adaptive’, which means it shifts or adapts between two formats – a smaller monitor-sized display, and a larger television-sized one.

The common justification of a rolling display is to have a television that can ‘disappear’ when you don’t need it, but the SHIFT creates a new sort of format. Instead of disappearing when you don’t need it, the SHIFT’s format explores an A vs B arrangement, where you can alternate between two screen sizes, choosing a smaller one while working at your desk, and a larger one for sitting back and watching a movie. To manage this, the SHIFT uses a display that extends sideways while rotating too (the GIF above should really explain how it works), effectively being able to expand in BOTH directions. The expanded display isn’t just wider, it’s taller too because the entire display rotates 90° while rolling open (so the horizontal width of the smaller screen becomes the vertical height of the larger screen).

The justification for this ‘adaptive rolling display’ is less of a cosmetic one and more of a functional one. While LG’s Rollable TV was designed to disappear into its base so you’re not left with an ugly black rectangle on your wall when the TV’s switched off, the SWITCH doesn’t really focus on the aesthetics of a disappearing TV, but rather tries to be dually functional, as a smaller work monitor, and as a larger television/entertainment system.

In serving its work purpose, the SHIFT comes with a rather interesting design detail concealed within its form. One of the rolling elements on the SHIFT’s bezel features a swiveling webcam that can rotate to face outwards when in use, and back into its dark void when not needed. When you’re working, or even joining large video conferences, the webcam swivels out and captures you while the screen itself shape-shifts to accommodate the web layout.

A notable feature of the SHIFT’s design is also its ability to change aspect ratio. The rolling screen is natively 21:9 in its smallest and largest formats, but it fills in a lot of intermediary aspect ratios too, going to 16:9 when you’re watching widescreen content, or even 4:3 for older shows or applications that run in 4:3. If you’re using the SHIFT to run an emulation of content on your phone, the rotating display can be used in portrait mode too, and can expand ever so slightly to mimic a tablet’s aspect ratio if needed.

For all that innovation packed in a somewhat utilitarian format that aims to ‘have your cake and eat it too’, the SHIFT isn’t a utilitarian-looking appliance. On the contrary, it’s incredibly well designed, sleek, and can shapeshift between the monitor and TV mode while looking ever so classy. The screen is backed by a fabric-clad panel that houses all the electronics and elements like the SHIFT’s speakers. The backside of the fabric panel even has a cable concealer that lets you hide all the ports, so no matter whether you look at the front, the side, or the back of the SHIFT, it looks incredibly clean and sophisticated, almost with the air of Samsung’s Serif TV.

Ultimately though, the SHIFT balances multiple roles and is designed to be used in different parts of the house. Unlike its LG counterpart, which focuses solely on using the rollable technology to make the TV as sleek and nonexistent as possible, SHIFT wants to be the TV that you also use in your WFH setup as well as for binge-watching Money Heist in the living room. The TV features a wheeled easel-style base that can conveniently be pushed around the house (just avoid the carpets), and the fabric clads on the back sport a palette of home-decor-friendly colors that should easily fit into most contemporary homes or office spaces.

Designers: Seungho Ro & Junha Kam

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This gorgeous curved OLED TV a fusion of Samsung’s Serif TV and its G9 Odyssey Gaming Monitor





I somehow never really liked Samsung’s Serif TV. Sure, it treats the television as furniture, but furniture and tech aren’t the same. I expect my furniture to be useful and my tech to be sleek… and while I expect both of them to look beautiful, the standards of beauty for tech and furniture aren’t necessarily the same. I don’t think the Samsung Serif got that, with its voluntarily large bezels. Abdelrahman Shaapan’s Flex OLED TV concept, however, takes the Serif TV’s ideology of merging tech with furniture, and amps it up in a way that actually makes the television look remarkable and desirable.

What Shaapan’s Flex OLED TV gets right off the bat is separating the television-unit visually from the furniture. The Flex OLED TV comes with a dazzlingly sleek bezel-less display that sits on top of the television’s ‘base-cabinet’ which resembles a table – the kind you’d place your TV on. After all, your TV should be surrounded by furniture – your TV shouldn’t BE furniture. With the Flex, that table forms a part of the TV, although visually distinct and separate… and it acts its base-support and housing its internal components like the built-in soundbar and the mechanism that gives the Flex OLED TV its most exciting feature!

As its name suggests, the Flex OLED TV possesses the ability to actually flex, going from a flat screen to a curved one with the push of a button. Complex mechanisms located within its base bend the display on command, turning it from a flat one to something immersive and more suited for a higher FOV – like games or movies. The curved display is much better suited for smaller viewing groups (2-3 people), while the flat view is great for large viewing parties like during sports events with 10-20 people. A simple button on a remote (or even a voice command) lets you instantly alternate between flat and curved views, while the built-in soundbar with 6 full-range audio drivers gives you an absolutely thunderous listening experience… all while ensuring that your TV looks incredibly sleek and future-forward!

Designer: Abdelrahman Shaapan

Sleek and modern appliances to perfectly match the interiors of your millennial home!

Home appliances are essentials in our houses. We need them to carry out a variety of activities, from storing food to watching our favorite sitcoms, washing our clothes and even keeping us cool in the summer! Televisions, refrigerators, air purifiers, washing machines – these are a few appliances that you find in every home. However, they often tend to be quite hefty and cumbersome! And that isn’t a look that suits our modern millennial homes very well. Hence, we’ve curated a collection of sleek, minimal, and trendy home appliances that merge perfectly with the modern interiors of our modern homes. These designs promise to seamlessly become a part of your living space, without standing out and looking like an eye sore. They’re a visual treat to our eyes, and not to mention super functional appliances that we absolutely cannot survive without!

Inspired by the Dutch painter Piet Mondrian’s composition of form and color, the Mondrian setup was made to allow a wide range of applications and blend into any interior setting. The aim was to solve three issues we experience with watching TV as we currently do – taking up space, not matching with the aesthetics, and lack of expandability. Urban apartments and single-person households need to maximize their space and should not have to choose between a large appliance and furniture when they can have both. Talking about interior aesthetics, TVs are now increasingly slimmer while the furniture remains warm and cozy – this causes a visual mismatch when the two are put together. Mondrian’s design serves both purposes with one seamless structure. TVs are now being used in many ways and need to be able to adapt to the different content it supports, not just static pre-made products.

The Hide Washing Machine, as its name suggests, features a hiding door that helps it occupy a little less space when in use. In the event that your washing machine’s door ends up blocking a pathway if opened, or colliding with a pillar/wall/door, the Hide allows you to simply circumvent that problem by tucking the door right into the machine’s body. This results in a marginally wider machine, but here’s where user behavior comes into play… people usually buy machines after comparing measurements with their laundry rooms, but they don’t always account for the washing machine’s door and how it opens. The Hide’s door opens like any normal one, but then immediately slides into itself, freeing up your passageway so you can walk around and go about your laundry.

Unlike most switches that have an ON and an OFF, Pasque Mawalla’s Switch behaves slightly differently. Designed to be a lamp in itself, the switch rocks upwards, downwards, and rests in a neutral position. While in neutral, the light stays off, but the minute you rock it either upwards or downwards, it turns into an ambient lamp, casting light in the direction it’s been angled. What’s remarkable about the Switch is that it’s a different product with the same UX as its predecessor. Designed to be switched on and off just like a normal switch, the lamp explores new ideas, making it rather innovative. Plus, it only seems natural that the lamp should go off when the switch is in its neutral position, flush against the wall!

Designed by Difei Wang of Hisense Industrial Design Center, the Art Fresh Bar refrigerator is the first in a handsome series that aims to mimic the look of traditional furniture pieces. In fact, it’s not even intended to be placed in your kitchen. Rather, its ultra-thin profile and fine finishes are designed to blend in with your living room, giving you and the rest of the family easy access to all sorts of snacks, beverages, and one-off items like wine and fruit. With an anticipated selection of various finishes and colors as well as customizable compartments, there’s sure to be one to satisfy any taste or use.

This conceptual coffee machine is very unlike the espresso makers in the market and it’s the aesthetics that set it apart. It is a dream machine for people who love coffee and space exploration equally (like me!). The compact capsule shape makes it look like a moon lander for your counter and is obviously powered by caffeine which is only the second most powerful fuel after rocket fuel! The designer’s main focus was to retain some of the rawness and the mechanical steampunk look of the traditional Italian espresso makes while maintaining a clean shape that adds character to the product. There is a tubular water/steam container at the back which I feel can be extended down for added support for the appliance. There is also another container for your beans which I assume leads to a small grinder mechanism inside so you only get the freshest cup of joe each time. Overall, the shape is very unique and combines the nostalgic steampunk elements with clean, smooth curves for a balanced modern machine.

Just when you thought you’ve seen it all, we have another cool appliance to add to this list – say hello (from 6 feet away) to Drawsher which is the child of a washer and dehumidifier! Laundry is one of the most disliked chores and so it is no surprise to me that many of us just let the clothes be in the basket till we run out of fresh underwear. It may not be stinky or filthy, but it is certainly not the most hygienic practice because you are lettings the bacteria from the clothes spill into the air around you. Also, if you don’t air out your washing machine after using it, it can lead to molds and malfunctioning of the appliance. Keeping all these details in mind, designer Kikang Kim created Drawsher which is a sanitary machine that functions as a laundry basket and a washing machine. You’ll notice that it also looks good unlike any washing machine you’ve seen before, and that is because Kim has based the design on a modern dresser that optimizes space and blends well with your interiors.

C SEED, a company known to make high-end outdoor televisions, has debuted the M1 – a whopping 165-inch 4K MicroLED beast that folds up and tucks away right underneath your floorboard. Before you get any ideas, the television retails for nearly half a million dollars, so it’s safe to say that only a select few will be able to afford this bad-boy. It may be the world’s coolest party-trick, but imagine being able to summon a television from the underground as your guests watch in sheer astonishment. Hit a button on the remote and the floor splits apart, with this pillar rising from within the chasm. The pillar then unfolds into a wide 165-inch screen, perfect to watch the Golden Globes on. Fashioned with 5 display panels that open and close like a folding fan, the M1 television really knows how to make an appearance. Its elaborate structure features a base that the display panels lock into once they open out. This base also houses the television’s powerful speaker system, including two 250W broadband speakers and one whopping 700W subwoofer to really pack that punch. While those stats may be impressive to a few, it’s the TV’s design that really gets my heart racing! The M1 doesn’t come with a single folded display, but rather features 5 panels that can seamlessly merge together to appear as one singular panel.

Kim Hyunsoec of hs2 studio created ‘Crevice’. Crevice is a beautiful 900x1970x920 mm double door fridge. Inspired by the experience of drawing your curtains wide open, the handles of the double door of Crevice completely resemble the opening of a curtain! The neat slit with its widened edges facing opposite directions brings to mind the exact moment when you grab the corners of your curtain, to tug them apart on a lazy Sunday morning. Created from stainless steel and featuring a matte black sheen, the aesthetics of Crevice have been designed to complement the interiors of your home. More than an electrical home appliance, it gives the impression of a piece of furniture. The furniture-like feel it resonates makes it suitable to be placed not only in the kitchen but also in the dining or living area. Spacious from within, it is divided into four vertical compartments with six shelving areas, providing ample space for your innumerous groceries. Not only is Crevice a storage wonder, but we must commend the visual appeal it possesses. This is a refrigerator with style!

The difference between Löv and every other air purifier on the market is evident in the way it’s designed. The Löv does to air purifiers what the Nest did to thermostats. It comes with a sophisticated design that just beautifully blends into its surrounding decor, looking modern and artistic rather than antiquated and technical, and comes with a user experience that’s so simplified, anyone could use it. The Löv air purifier is a pleasure to use, but it’s also a pleasure to look at… and that’s a design direction most smart home product manufacturers try to take, be it Google, Amazon, Apple, and even companies like IKEA, that are only now entering the smart appliance market. The key to a well-made smart-home product is to not only realize its relationship with the user, but also its relationship with the space it’s in. The Löv looks quite unlike any purifier you’ve seen, with an aesthetic that embraces the minimalism of Scandinavian Design. Created to seamlessly blend into your home, the Löv comes with a soft, rounded form, and an abstract grille design that balances art and engineering. The grille pattern is inspired directly by natural details like branches and the veins of a leaf, becoming an ode to nature, the world’s own air purifier.

lora_air_conditioner_layout

lora_air_conditioner_01

Winter is on its way out soon, but you can keep it coming every day of the summer season, thanks to the atypical Lora. Unlike most air conditioners, Lora is not boxy nor an air curtain. It’s more like a pendant lamp that hangs from the ceiling and showers you with cool air. Adding a touch of ambient lighting to the mix (think Northern Lights), Lora goes on to showcase the fan speed, temperature, and air blast in correlation to mesmerizing twinkly lights. What I really appreciate is the attempt to break the clutter and give a new form to air conditioners. Adding lights and intuitive UI UX is just a bonus.

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You can make DraftKings sports bets using your Dish DVR

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This 165-inch 4K folding television disappears right into the ground when you turn it off!

Forget LG’s Rollable TV or Xiaomi’s Transparent TV, an Austrian tech company is setting the gold standard in how televisions look and behave in interior spaces. C-SEED, a company known to make high-end outdoor televisions, has debuted the M1 – a whopping 165-inch 4K MicroLED beast that folds up and tucks away right underneath your floorboard. Before you get any ideas, the television retails for nearly half a million dollars, so it’s safe to say that only a select few will be able to afford this bad-boy.

It may be the world’s coolest party-trick, but imagine being able to summon a television from the underground as your guests watch in sheer astonishment. Hit a button on the remote and the floor splits apart, with this pillar rising from within the chasm. The pillar then unfolds into a wide 165-inch screen, perfect to watch the Golden Globes on.

Fashioned with 5 display panels that open and close like a folding fan, the M1 television really knows how to make an appearance. Its elaborate structure features a base that the display panels lock into once they open out. This base also houses the television’s powerful speaker system, including two 250W broadband speakers and one whopping 700W subwoofer to really pack that punch. While those stats may be impressive to a few, it’s the TV’s design that really gets my heart racing! The M1 doesn’t come with a single folded display, but rather features 5 panels that can seamlessly merge together to appear as one singular panel. The MicroLED technology, combined with 4K, really allows images to stand out with superior contrast and brightness (as well as phenomenally dark blacks), but C-SEED’s Adaptive Gap Calibration Technology takes the cake, as it makes the LEDs near the edges of the panels shine brighter, allowing those seams/lines to disappear, creating the illusion of one large screen instead of 5 small ones. To keep the entire TV lightweight, its frame and outer body comes made from aviation-grade aluminum (with a unique lattice structure behind the screens to provide structure and strength). The M1 comes in 4 colors – Silver, Gold, Black, and Titanium, and boasts a price tag of $400,000. I wonder whether that includes the elaborate in-floor installation charge…

Designer: C-SEED