Sustainable product alternatives to mass-produced everyday designs so you can lead a green lifestyle!

The world is drastically changing, and it’s affecting the way we live and function. Although the irony is that the world is drastically changing because of our unhealthy practices and us! It’s now imperative to live more sustainably, carefully, and consciously. Integrating sustainability into our day-to-day lives has become crucial! And we can do this in various ways. Designers and creators are coming up with sustainable alternatives for almost everything! Every product that is necessary and utilized by us in our everyday routine has an eco-friendly alternative to it. Replacing our usual mass-produced designs with these greener options will make a huge difference to the environment and Mother Earth! From reusable totes made from fruit skins to the world’s first disposable paper razor, we’ve curated a whole collection of sustainable products that will have major functionality in our daily lives. It’s time to go green!

This gives a completely new meaning to the word ‘papercut’! Say hello to the Paper Razor, a sustainable alternative to the disposable plastic razor. The Paper Razor, as its name suggests, comes with an all-paper body and sports a metal blade-head on top. Designed to be flat-packed, the single-use razor comes completely unfolded and can easily be put together in a matter of seconds by merely folding in the sides and the top to create a rigid, ergonomic razor with a grippy handle. Its origami-inspired design gives it as much strength and maneuverability as a plastic razor while minimizing the use of plastic by as much as 98%. The result? A razor that can be easily flat-packed and shipped, used and then disposed of… safely, of course.

Using totes instead of single-use shopping bags can help reduce your carbon footprint even further if they’re made of sustainable materials. To offer a sustainable alternative, designers Johanna Hehemeyer-Cürten and Lobke Beckfeld made Sonne155, a reusable tote and sustainable alternative to the paper bag. Sonnet155 is entirely made from biodegradable materials to ensure that each bag can break down into water or soil. Hehemeyer-Cürten and Beckfeld constructed the tote bags from the composite of two raw materials: cellulosic production waste from the textile industry and pectin, which partially mimics the gelling effects of gelatin. Cellulosic production waste comes from cellulose, the structural cell wall found in plants, while pectin is a plant-based polysaccharide derived from the skin of fruits.

Designed by Carvey Ehren Maigue of Mapua University, these panels can be crafted into windows or walls which will harvest solar energy and convert it into electricity. Three things that made me instantly fall in love with this design are 1) clean renewable energy 2) using crop waste and 3) lower electricity bills. AuRUES was inspired by the phenomenon of the aurora lights which is a whimsical natural process that occurs when luminescent particles in the upper atmosphere absorb energy from UV and gamma radiation and emit it as visible light. The panels mimic this process by embedding similar luminescent particles in resin so that when the sunlight hits the panel it absorbs the UV and produces visible light. The light is then directed towards the edges of the panel where regular photovoltaic cells collect the energy to turn it into electricity. The colors of the luminescent particles come from dyes that were made from waste crops which makes this a closed-loop system.

The Dissolvable Noodle Packaging finds a unique, no-waste packaging solution for instant-ramen. Instead of wrapping the noodles in layers of plastic (with an extra plastic sachet filled with the tastemaker powder), Holly decided to develop an edible, spice-infused biofilm to package the noodles in. When you want to cook yourself some ramen, just insert the pre-packaged noodle cake into hot water and the biofilm dissolves in the water, turning it into a flavored broth! “The packaging becomes the sauce”, says Holly, who managed to design and develop her solution right in her own kitchen! The biofilm uses simple, edible ingredients like potato starch, glycerin, and water. “The ingredients are blended and heated until the mixture is at the right thickness. At this point, I add the spices and flavorings before pouring it into a mold to set for 24 hours”, Holly mentions.

Based out of Geneva, theGVA (The Green Value Attitude) is trying to perfect the ‘business model of paper’. theGVA’s notebooks aren’t just sustainably grown, each notebook’s purchase actually adds back to the environment more than it took from it. The ‘eco-friendly’ notebook comes with FSC paper, grown under internationally certified sustainable conditions, made from a combination of virgin wood pulp (cultivated responsibly from well-maintained and managed forests), as well as recycled paper. The cover of the notebook comes crafted from a uniquely tactile and smooth bamboo ply. Given how rapidly bamboo can be cultivated, the bamboo harvested for the notebook covers can be well accounted for within just a few months. The covers are left bare, giving you the freedom to either color in your own cover, or etch out your company’s graphic. The notebooks are all hand-bound and hand-stitched with leather spines, and complete with an elastic band to hold it all together.

unocup1

Not-so-fun fact: New York City alone generates enough plastic lid waste to cover the entire earth THREE times. To solve this issue and keep coffee from spilling on your clothes, Unocup designed an ergonomic paper cup that folds into itself to create a spill-proof lid! Just fold over each flap and insert the tab to close the “lid”. To open, it is a simple press of a button that will gently open the flap instead of trying to carefully pop off the lid – praying for you if you attempt that with long nails. This cup has a unique shape that fits into your palm, the uniform structure creates a strong and consistent body that will not cave under pressure, unlike traditional paper cups. The drinking curved spout is specifically designed to fit your lips naturally as opposed to the otherwise flat plastic lids. You can also fold flaps backward and drink from the rim just like a normal drinking glass.

The Prescription Paper Pill Bottle, a first of its kind, is 100% compostable and biodegradable. Its open-source design adheres to FDA regulations for durability, light, water, and child resistance. It’s available to any pharmacy for filling prescription tablets and capsules. Once used then emptied, the paper bottle can be tossed into any compostable bin with its Rx label to decompose and be reused as fertilizer to safely replenish the soil in fields, gardens, and landscapes,” says the team. Tikkun Olam Makers made it an open-source design which means anyone anywhere in the world can use their method and make their own paper pill bottles by downloading the .stl file that contains the attendant images and assembly instructions.

Gabriel Steinmann created P0 (pronounced pio like the letter and number) which stands for ‘project zero’  – a storage and shopping solution for food that aims to reduce consumption emissions. P0 helps us to switch to and maintain a plant-based diet and reduce the amount of food waste. The design blends organic and sustainable materials with an earthy aesthetic to invoke warmth and a more personal relationship with the items we use. Its ceramic body and textile lining help encourage a deeper appreciation for the food we consume and make us more aware of how much food we actually need to minimize wasting it. It is also a practical and attractive utensil in your kitchen – “a symbol of change, of becoming a little bit more human,” as rightly described by Steinmann.

Not-so-fun-fact: suitcases are not recyclable and end up in the landfill 9 out of 10 times. To combat this waste that stems from our love for traveling, a team of designers created RHITA – a suitcase that is super easy to assemble and disassemble which makes it easier to repair or recycle. RHITA’s simplified structure reduces the number of parts used in production by 70% when compared to traditional suitcases. Even the space needed for transportation has been reduced by 33%. It features an innovative hinge system and a unique installation method – no glue or rivet for fixation, no sewing of the inner lining, maximizing the space inside as well as a quick fasten and loosen wheel mechanism.

Element 0 is altering how shoes are designed and manufactured by making sustainability just as important as comfort. This means re-engineering the shoe’s materials in a way that benefits your feet as well as the environment. Element 0’s sneakers sport a unisex design built from both naturally sourced as well as recycled materials (the company is even transparent about where and how they source their materials). The shoes rest on an outsole that’s made from rubber as well as recycled cork, quite literally putting a spring in your step; while an insole crafted from a combination of wool, corn-fiber, wood, and natural latex gives your foot a comfortable surface to rest on that’s also water-absorbent and anti-odor. To cap things off, Element 0’s outer body balances aesthetics with breathability as well as sustainability. The fabric on the outer body is woven from plastic yarn sourced from recycled PET bottles as well as discarded fishing nets.

This sustainable storage container + shopping bag reduces your consumption emissions and food waste!





Open your refrigerator – how many plastic containers do you see? Now open that cabinet where you store your shopping bags – do you really need that many plastic bags? We often store in our takeout boxes/plastic containers and keep those plastic bags in hopes to reuse someday because we forget to carry our cloth bags to the store. Most of these little habits are formed because it is convenient and cheap but we do them without thinking about the effects of its continued use on our environment. To solve both problems with one design, Gabriel Steinmann created P0 (pronounced pio like the letter and number) which stands for ‘project zero’  – a storage and shopping solution for food that aims to reduce consumption emissions.

P0 helps us to switch to and maintain a plant-based diet and reduce the amount of food waste. The design blends organic and sustainable materials with an earthy aesthetic to invoke warmth and a more personal relationship with the items we use. Its ceramic body and textile lining help encourage a deeper appreciation for the food we consume and make us more aware of how much food we actually need to minimize wasting it. It is also a practical and attractive utensil in your kitchen – “a symbol of change, of becoming a little bit more human,” as rightly described by Steinmann.

The jury at iF Design Awards gave PO the ‘iF Design Talent Award 2020’ because it raises awareness and facilitates sustainable food consumption using a very beautifully designed functional product. “The design will appeal to early adopters who will become ambassadors for this product. The whole process is well thought-out and the combination of the different materials is aesthetically pleasing and endorses the entire concept. The possibility of customization makes it even more personal and inspires others to change their food consumption habits,” added the jury.

This self-sufficient, parametric, adaptable storage-and shopping solution is something I would really love to see taking over the world and make that sustainable switch in our lifestyle convenient enough to ditch the plastic containers and shopping bags.

Designer: Gabriel Steinmann

This instant noodle’s water-soluble packaging becomes its sauce!

The very concept of packaging instant noodles in plastic is baffling to me. The noodles take barely 5 minutes to cook, and another 5 minutes to eat… but the plastic packaging takes nearly a century to biodegrade. Sounds really odd, doesn’t it? Well, for Holly Grounds, a product design graduate from Ravensbourne University London, it seemed like a problem that definitely deserved fixing. Grounds’ clever little solution eliminates plastic and replaces it with something much more sensible… an edible, water-soluble gelatinous skin that actually turns into the noodle broth when dipped in water.

The Dissolvable Noodle Packaging finds a unique, no-waste packaging solution for instant-ramen. Instead of wrapping the noodles in layers of plastic (with an extra plastic sachet filled with the tastemaker powder), Holly decided to develop an edible, spice-infused biofilm to package the noodles in. When you want to cook yourself some ramen, just insert the pre-packaged noodle-cake into hot water and the biofilm dissolves in the water, turning it into a flavored broth! “The packaging becomes the sauce”, says Holly, who managed to design and develop her solution right in her own kitchen! The biofilm uses simple, edible ingredients like potato starch, glycerin, and water. “The ingredients are blended and heated until the mixture is at the right thickness. At this point, I add the spices and flavorings before pouring it into a mold to set for 24 hours”, Holly mentions.

Designer: Holly Grounds

Here’s a look at the biofilm that’s been pre-seasoned with spices and garnishes. In its pliable state, the film can easily be wrapped around a cake of noodles, allowing it to set and harden as the film dries out.

It’s worth noting that this solution translates perfectly onto packaging for other products like rice or even pasta! The biofilm can easily be seasoned with spices and powders, sort of turning the packaging into the product’s flavoring. In a way, it also replaces the need to use labels and graphics on product packaging. With Holly’s Dissolvable Noodle Packaging, you can quite literally see the ingredients like sesame seeds, chili flakes, and seaweed strips in the packaging, allowing you to visually judge and differentiate between different flavors!

Skullcandy’s $25 ‘affordable’ TWS earphones are going to be an absolute disaster for our environment

What can you buy for $25? A great bottle of wine? Two large pizzas? A pair of TWS earphones? No, not those cheap ones off of AliBaba, I’m talking a real pair of TWS earphones from a bonafide audio company. Earlier today, Skullcandy launched Dime, a pair of budget wireless earbuds. They come with a 12-hour battery life (with the case), are IPX4 water-resistant, and cost 1/10th the price of the AirPods. At a price of $24.99, the Dime might be the cheapest pair of TWS earphones from a reputed audio brand.

“Dime breaks down all barriers formerly associated with true wireless,” says Jeff Hutchings, Skullcandy’s chief product officer, in a press release, “Offering stellar sound and unmatched simplicity at a price that makes it possible to throw a pair in every bag.” The TWS earphones come with a plastic construction and in 4 colours – Black, Gray, Green, and Blue. At their ‘throwaway’ price, the earphones really cut corners in a few places. They come with a 3.5 hour battery life, extended to half a day when charged in the case. The Dime doesn’t sport ANC (or any noise cancellation for that matter) or wireless charging. In fact, the earbuds don’t even come with touch-sensitive controls. They do, however, come with actual buttons (one on each earbud) that let you control volume, answer/reject calls, or cycle through music. Other than that, they’re just a pair of solid earphones with a secure fit and an IPX4 water-resistance rating, making them perfect for wearing while going on a jog or while at the beach. As far as sound-quality is concerned, $25 bucks will only get you so far… but given this is coming from a company as big as Skullcandy, they should sound pretty good for their price.

While this is a story about consumer-friendly innovation and how one company managed to make good TWS tech accessible to a large group of people by bringing the price down, it’s also a story of the environmental aftermath of such decisions. The earphones come made from plastic, although there’s really no indication of whether the plastic’s recycled or not (my money is on ‘No’). However, that’s just a small part of the Dime’s critique. The most important part about these earphones really is their price tag and the ‘throwaway’ culture that tag really feeds into, intentionally or unintentionally. At $25, there’s no way these earphones are designed to be repaired (repairing them may actually be more expensive), which means if and when they ever get spoilt, Skullcandy just expects you to throw out the old pair out and buy a new one instead. Given their size, and how ridiculously tiny the components within them are, chances are they’ll never be recycled for parts either… and once thrown, the Dime will just end up in a landfill or the ocean, resulting in plastic pollution, e-waste, and millions of tiny lithium-ion batteries entering our soil or waterways. Skullcandy? More like Skull-and-cross-bones…

Designer: Skullcandy

Razer’s new stainless steel reusable straw makes sustainability ‘sexy’!

Why does a gaming tech company need to launch a reusable straw? I imagine it’s vertical integration of some weird sort, given how much time gamers spend sipping carbonated beverages. Or maybe there isn’t really any logic to it – like the time Tesla sold surfboards, or The Boring Company sold flamethrowers. The point is that logic aside, Razer’s unveiled a series of collapsible, portable, reusable, stainless-steel straws. They retail for $19.99, come with a cleaning brush, and are capped with a silicone tip so you don’t accidentally burn your lips off hot beverages.

The Razer Reusable Straw comes made from food-grade 304 stainless steel, with a telescopic design that allows it to be disassembled when not in use, for easy storage. When put together, the straw measures 230mm – optimally long enough for a Venti-size drink at Starbucks, although it isn’t diametrically wide enough for a McFlurry or Boba Tea (so don’t bother trying). For hot drinks, the anodized black straw comes with an acid-green silicone sleeve that prevents your lips from accidentally touching hot metal. The entire straw is infinitely reusable, and comes with its own cleaning brush for maintenance-purposes, all packaged in a nifty silicone carrying case with a carabiner, so you could strap your Reusable Straw right to your belt loop like EDC, or tuck it into your pocket and carry it with you everywhere you go.

Designer: Razer

Move over, Iron Throne! This wooden throne is made from recycled pallets, but looks just as imperial!

Clearly, this chair wasn’t designed for your average living room! Titled the ‘Pallet Thief’, this wooden throne was created by Anton Brunberg in response to a question he once had – “How to still celebrate the pure joy of making and craftsmanship without having to use up the planet’s precious raw materials?”

Just by Anton’s calculations, there are roughly six billion pallets in circulation worldwide, most of which are made of wood. Each year, one percent of those pallets (approx 60,000) reach the end of their lifespan or are lost. By tapping into this industrial global supply, Anton discovered a way of turning unusable waste from one industry into raw material for another industry. The ‘Pallet Thief’ is certainly no ordinary piece of furniture, but then again, it’s a vision and a proof of concept for Anton, who aimed at showing the potential this recycled pallet wood has in the furniture-design world. It comes with hundreds of pallet planks joint together before the seat is carved out of the central mass. Further sanding creates a seating surface that’s perfectly smooth and comfortable to sit in, while it also showcases the planks and wood-grain as if it were a design feature. For that extra bit of flair, the wooden planks are left untouched around the edge, giving the chair the appearance of a sea-urchin sculpted out of wood… or a ‘wooden’ Iron Throne, if you’re looking for a more poetic comparison!

Designer: Anton Brunberg

World’s most sustainable luxury catamaran, the Sunreef 80 Eco is destined to set sail this summer!

Designed primarily with the idea of facilitating responsible sailing backed by clean, renewable energy, the Sunreef 80 Eco yacht has just received the go-ahead to be a real sail for the affluent. When it’s out there for grabs, this will be the most sustainable luxury catamaran ever, which would, of course, inculcate the wonderful combination of ultra-modern green technology and supreme comfort of superyacht living.

The all-electric vessel is designed and will now be produced in-house by Sunreef Yachts to be a custom catamaran that navigates long distances in total silence. According to the builders, the Sunreef 80 Eco will have no range limitations since it will be powered by renewable energy, produced on the go, both above and below the waterline. It is an 80-foot long eco-cruiser that’s likely to feature Sunreef Yachts’ proprietary solar skin comprising the world’s lightest solar cells. This photovoltaic system will span a total surface of 150m², covering the hull sides, bimini, superstructure, and carbon mast of the Sunreef 80 Eco. This entire solar unit will generate up to 34kWp energy, which will be stored in ultralight lithium batteries on board.

For wind-free propulsion, the Sunreef 80 Eco will run on either of the twin 180kW electric engines offering it an energy-efficient performance. The advanced hydro generation system onboard will allow the catamaran to recover energy from the propeller rotation while under sail generating over 15kWh at about 7 knots. This energy will be used to power both the propulsion and appliances of the Sunreef 80 Eco.

In addition to the glorious energy-efficient forte, this luxury catamaran will be highly customizable, offering infinite décor possibilities using ethically-sourced and sustainable furnishing and finishing materials. Intended for the long-over-sea eco-friendly adventures, the Sunreef 80 Eco is likely to debut in the first half of 2021. The pricing and other details are not yet revealed, but we are guessing this pairing of the most innovative photovoltaic system, hydro generation, and luxury will bear a drool-worthy, futuristic fruit!

Designer: Sunreef Yachts

Inspired by origami, this collapsible syringe provides an eco-friendly alternative to reduce biomedical waste!





Billions of needles and syringes are used each year, including needles used for injections made by those who are healthcare professionals and those who are not. When improperly disposed of, needle and syringe waste can create a serious biohazard since the inner tubing’s infected blood cannot be broken down or processed through recycling. This mass accumulation of waste might reach a peak with the global rollout of COVID-19 vaccines, but one designer has already taken to the drawing board for solutions. Helix, a collapsible syringe, was designed by Daniel López Velasco & Ithzel Libertad Cerón López as a green alternative to the disposable devices used in today’s health sector.

A conventional syringe, those plastic tubes with the string-thin steel needle, requires the use of five different materials for construction including steel, polyethylene, rubber, resin, glue, and thermal dye. To make the construction process less laborious and costly, Helix is constructed from a single material: FlexiOH UV, a heat-curable type of silicone. To maintain Helix’s collapsible parts’ flexibility and the needle’s rigidity, the designers employed thermal-curing, a temperature-induced hardening process.

Inspired by the ability to compact lots of volume and space through the paper-folding art of origami, Helix’s crystalline, silicone structure is able to carry liquids for vaccines and be emptied once collapsed. Medication can be poured into Helix through a vacuum loading inlet located above the needle’s rigid plunger. Then, when ready for use, the rigid plunger sinks down and compresses the collapsible plunger, successfully and safely administering the medication to the patient through the rigid silicone needle.

In constructing Helix from a single material and giving it a compact, collapsible structure, the designers created a green alternative to the conventional syringe and needle, reducing its size by 30%. The issue of biomedical waste might be reaching a peak with the onset of 2020’s global pandemic and the upcoming vaccine rollout, but designs like Helix help streamline safe healthcare practices while maintaining World Health Organization and environmental standards.

Designers: Daniel López Velasco & Ithzel Libertad Cerón López

Entirely constructed from a single material, each Helix syringe is made from FlexiOH UV, a heat-curable type of silicone.

Inspired by the paper-folding art of origami, Helix employs a collapsible method for giving safe doses of medication.





The rigid needle of Helix is made from the same material as the rest of the collapsible syringe.

The silicone needle is strong enough to substitute the steel needle.

The rigidity of Helix’s needle and the flexibility of the syringe was achieved through a process called Thermal-curing.

Medication is loaded into Helix through a vacuum loading inlet located at the top of the syringe.

When in use, the collapsible syringe administers medication to the patient through a double hollow, allowing the medication to flow freely.

Without the need to remove the needle from the syringe before disposal, Helix can be disposed of completely.

World’s first paper disposable razor unveiled in Japan

This gives a completely new meaning to the word ‘papercut’! Say hello to the Paper Razor, a sustainable alternative to the disposable plastic razor. The Paper Razor, as its name suggests, comes with an all-paper body and sports a metal blade-head on top. Designed to be flat-packed, the single-use razor comes completely unfolded and can easily be put together in a matter of seconds by merely folding in the sides and the top to create a rigid, ergonomic razor with a grippy handle. Its origami-inspired design gives it as much strength and maneuverability as a plastic razor, while minimizing the use of plastic by as much as 98%. The result? A razor that can be easily flat-packed and shipped, used, and then disposed of… safely, of course.

You’re obviously wondering, how would a paper razor fare under exposure to water? Well, the fine folks at the Japan-based Kai Group fashioned the Paper Razor out of a relatively water-resistant grade of paper – keeping durable milk cartons and cardboard paper-spoons in mind. The handle can withstand water temperatures of up to 104°F (40°C), allowing you to shave with lukewarm water, and the metal head even features a notched channel on top that makes it easy to rinse shaved hair off the blade every few strokes. Designed ideally for travelers, the single-use Paper Razor offers a much more ecologically-conscious alternative to those disposable all-plastic razors. The overall razor weighs a mere 4 grams, comes in a flat-pack that’s no more than 5mm thick, and is available across 5 different colors – ocean blue, botanical red, jade green, sunny yellow, and sand beige.

Designer: Kai Group

This simple idea hopes to turn Amazon into the world’s biggest sustainable second-hand store

Ever wondered how difficult it is to get rid of stuff? Or rather, get rid of stuff at the right price? Our current e-commerce setup is perfect for buying and selling new things, but that’s about it… It doesn’t encourage thrifting, second-hand selling, renting, recycling, or repairing. You can ask Alexa to order you a coffee machine and it arrives at your doorstep the next day; but what do you do when the coffee machine needs repairing? Or if you want to sell the machine because you don’t really use it? That’s where Scott Amron’s brilliant idea comes in.

We spoke to Scott about Amazon After back in 2019 when it was just a nascent idea. Over the last year, Scott’s had some time to really develop the idea and flesh its details out. His idea broadly builds on Amazon’s ability to serve its customers, extending its world-class service beyond just the ‘Checkout’ button. With Amazon After, your product journey doesn’t end with the checkout. Amazon After actively manages your products after you buy them, giving you the ability to check their second-hand value, and resell them, rent them, recycle them, repair them, or donate them… or as Scott says, “Amazon After can add value to every Amazon purchase and extend the life cycle of the products Amazon sells. It puts the customer first, after.”

Scott describes Amazon After as a ‘very smart wanted ad’. Someone who wants to purchase a product gets the option of buying it second-hand at a lower price. They input their asking value and Amazon instantly notifies every single person who bought that product. If a product-owner finds the asker’s price agreeable, Amazon facilitates the purchase just like it would when you buy something from an Amazon Seller. The product is collected from one owner and delivered to the new owner, and Amazon gets a small cut… but more interestingly enough, it ensures people who don’t need a product aren’t forced to own it, and can easily get rid of it for a quick buck. What’s more exciting is that Scott believes this will actually drive people to use the Amazon service and the app much more, allowing them to easily open their past orders and see exactly how much all their products are worth on the second-hand market. If at any point in time you see a potential buyer quoting an amount of money you’re happy with, just agree to the trade and Amazon jumps in to be the facilitator. It also creates a powerful market for collectibles… something Scott noticed when he went to buy a BB8 toy for his child, only to see it was being resold as a collectible for nearly 10 times the actual retail price.

Obviously, this new buyer-seller interaction hinges solely on sellers conforming to the ‘trust code’. The ability to resell products would only be available to Prime members, creating an exclusive club of resellers (one that anyone can join), and these members will be expected to be honest while reselling their products, listing if it’s unused, overused, damaged, or defective. Moreover, the Amazon After feature also unlocks other abilities, like donating items, finding repairers, or efficient recyclers. If you have a niche product that requires an expert to fix (say a Smoke Alarm for example), Amazon currently doesn’t offer any after-sales services – apart from probably letting you download the user manual. With Amazon After, you can have the right people come over and fix it, or even dispose of it effectively for you, enabling it to be recycled properly. You see, Amazon already handles returns, so it’s just a small yet significant upgrade on their part to also handle reselling as well as repair… but for the consumer, it gives you a reason to shop on the e-commerce website knowing that you’ll be entitled to Amazon’s state-of-the-art services even after you hit that ‘Buy Now’ button. Not to mention the fact that it keeps products in circulation, so that the “Currently Unavailable” sign becomes a thing of the past and people are more inclined to buy, sell, and use pre-loved products… sort of like the world’s largest thrift or second-hand store!

Designer: Amron Experimental (Scott Amron)

The Amazon After service isn’t affiliated with or sponsored by Amazon. There is no existing partnership or collaboration between the service and Amazon. The Amazon trademark is owned by Amazon.