A sleek Nintendo Switch Bike like this would tempt the gamers to step out and play!

A Nintendo Switch-inspired electric bike that carries the definitive design language of the popular handheld gaming console – signaling the imagined form of Nintendo’s automotive character, if ever the company decides to take that road.

Handheld gaming consoles and Nintendo are synonyms that keep the nerdy crowd engaged for countless hours of fun. With the portable gaming console market size projected to touch 16 billion by 2026, it is destined to make up the major chunk of the overall gaming industry. Nintendo’s handheld gaming console commands an advantageous position in the fight for supremacy in the portable console market – and why not – it is designed well and comes with a unique collection of gaming titles!

Taking inspiration from Nintendo’s core beliefs and the radical design philosophy, product designer HTH Han has mustered up the idea of a Nintendo electric bicycle. Christened the Nintendo Switch Bike, this two-wheeler is modeled around the handheld gaming console’s core vision. A belief that what if Nintendo expands into the sports and outdoor market. Han uses the disoriented element of the Switch’s Joy-Con to create the frame of the bicycle. Frankly, this design element looks very nice.

Battery placement is one of the prime considerations in any electric bike, and this one accommodates it smartly in the frame. The lower section of the neon blue-colored frame to be precise, and it can be taken out for recharging with the push of a button. This increases the balanced styling approach of the hubless wheel electric bike as well. Han adapts the comfortable ergonomics, simple aesthetics, intuitive placement of buttons and keys, and the symmetrical interface of the controllers as the designing roadmap for the Nintendo Switch Bike.

The bicycle’s pedal comes with tactically placed LED lights on the outside face for driving safety at night. On the top of the pedal is a light indicator denoting the battery status to the rider for a quick glance at the information. Just like other electric bicycles, the front and rear have bright LED lights to keep the driver safe on the road from the road rage of other motorists. On the front, the flat panel display shows the map, current time, weather and battery status.

Designer: HTH Han

LEGO Expert Turns NES Kit into a Game Boy Transformer

As a fan of classic video games and LEGO bricks, I was pretty stoked when they released the official LEGO Nintendo Entertainment System in 2020. The 2600+ piece set lets you build a detailed model of an NES along with a TV set, a game cartridge, and a gamepad. Now, one inventive LEGO builder has figured out how to reconfigure the kit into a completely different Nintendo system – a Game Boy. But this isn’t just any Game Boy – this is the Game Boy ROBO.

The Moko Brick Laboratory specializes in making transforming robots out of LEGO parts. Their latest build used some of the numerous parts from the LEGO NES to create this awesome Game Boy that can turn into a robot. Sure, the Transformers had cars and cassette tape players that could turn into robots, but they never had a Game Boy. Now, all we need is for Nintendo to develop a way to make one of these that is actually playable, and they’d sell millions. Can you imagine playing Super Mario Bros. or Tetris on this thing?

Check out the full build video for the Game Boy ROBO below:

I love how this guy wears white gloves while working on his LEGO builds. Parents, I suggest that you make your kids do the same so they don’t get chocolate and Cheetos dust all over the bricks like they usually do.

A Gallery of Clear Gadgets

The first time I had an electronic gadget that I could see inside of without cracking it open was the original iMac G3. With its semi-transparent colored backside, you could barely make out the electronic components inside, and even then, most of them were hidden beneath massive RF shielding. But it turns out that there have been many gadgets, computers, and electronics inside of clear shells over the years. The guys at Computer Love Records got me thinking about these see-through devices and found a clear Apple Newton, a clear Polaroid 660 instant camera, a clear GameBoy Color, among others.

Polaroid 660 Special Edition Camera

While my initial assumption was that these transparent versions were meant to keep prison inmates from hiding contraband inside of them, it turns out that it’s common to develop clear pre-production prototypes so that engineers and designers can see the placement of components inside. Beyond that, sometimes brands release special see-through versions of their products, as Sony did with its Crystal DualShock controllers. Scroll down to see the complete our gallery of transparent computers, gadgets, and electronic gear:

Apple Newton MessagePad 110 Prototype

See-Through Prison TV

Game Boy Color Launch Edition

Apple Mac Portable Prototype

Sony Crystal DualShock 4 Controller

Vintage 1980s Unisonic Phone

Apple Vintage eMate 300 Laptop Prototype

Sony PlayStation 2 Slim (SCPH-9000x) Prototype

This Nintendo Game Boy-inspired walkie talkie takes you straight to the 90’s with style!

10-2, the 90s are back with this Nintendo Game Boy-inspired walkie-talkie!

Designer Sidhant Patnaik’s skills in KeyShot will take most of us back to our childhood a.k.a the time we didn’t have smartphones but instead, we had beloved gadgets like Game Boys. Even today you will find many Game Boy stans and this walkie-talkie is a collectible for the fandom.

The design sticks to the original aesthetics but instead of playing your favorite games, this one lets you communicate with those around you (yes, we all have phones but this is far more exciting!) so better brush up on the lingo, do you copy?

Bonus points to Sidhant for the neon-yellow screen that takes us to the glow you would see every night you spend your eyes glued to your game while staying up, late in the night!

The volume controls are run by a tiny knob on the top of the walkie-talkie, with a red line to highlight the volume. The classic combination of red, white, and black is an ode to our memories.

If this walkie-talkie becomes a reality, it will be like the summer of Pokemon Go all over again and we are not complaining!

Designer: Sidhant Patnaik

The best Switch controllers for every player level

The Nintendo Switch is pretty popular, but its included Joy-Cons aren’t for everyone. Some players feel the detachable controllers are a bit small for their hands. Many players miss having a regular D-pad. Whatever your reasons for wanting to upgrade your Switch controller situation, know that there are alternatives — it’s just a matter of picking the one that fits your needs. We tested out a bunch of Switch controllers to see which are worth your money.

For casual gaming: Joy-Cons

Nintendo Switch Joy-Cons
Kris Naudus / Engadget

Honestly, there’s a lot to like about the included Joy-Cons. They come right in the box and can be separated from the system so two people can play. The system also includes a special gamepad grip so you can hold them in your hand like any standard controller. So if you are in fact, happy with your Joy-Cons, there’s no need to switch them out. Just tweak them a little depending on your needs. Find them a tad too small? FastSnail’s matte rubber shells can make them a little easier for large hands to hold, and Hori’s Analog Caps can make the thumb sticks grippier. 

Buy FastSnail grips at Amazon - $14Buy Hori analog caps at Amazon - $9

There’s really no good way to replace the Joy-Cons entirely with a third-party copy. Some Joy-Con-like controllers won’t connect wirelessly, while others lack key features like vibration or an NFC reader. But there are some tradeoffs that are worth it. For example, if you like to play a lot of 2D platformers in handheld mode, Hori’s D-pad controller will restore the beloved cross-shaped directional button to your gameplay. If you’re looking for something that’s also more comfortable in your hand, the company’s $50 Split Pad Pro is also worth a look. It has a D-pad on the left side and a more ergonomic grip than your standard set of Joy-Cons. But it also makes the entire assembled Switch a lot chunkier.

If you like to play your Switch with groups (or you’ve experienced the dreaded “drift” issue), chances are you’ve picked up one or two extra pairs of Joy-Cons. Which means you’re going to need a place to charge the spares. PowerA makes an excellent $25 charging station that can be plugged into your Switch dock (or any device with a USB port) and handles four Joy-Con-like controllers at once — that includes third-party gamepads as well as Nintendo’s own Switch-compatible NES controllers (see below).

Buy Hori D-pad controller at Amazon - $60Buy Split Pad Pro at Amazon - $88Buy PowerA charging dock at Amazon - $25

For action-packed games: Pro-level controllers

Nintendo Switch Pro Controller
Kris Naudus / Engadget

Sometimes you just want a standard controller to play your favorite action titles — and standard in 2020 means something like you’d get packed in with an Xbox, with grips for the heels of your hands, shoulder buttons and triggers, two thumb sticks, a set of four buttons on the right and a D-pad on the left. Nintendo knows that, which is why it created the Pro Controller. This first-party gamepad pairs easily with the Switch and features a D-pad on the left, while still maintaining features like the infrared sensor and vibration that might go missing on third-party alternatives. The only downside is the $70 price, but avid players of games like Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild will appreciate the refined controls and increased comfort.

While you can plug your Pro Controller directly into your Switch dock to charge, it’s not the most elegant solution. PowerA also makes an attractive $25 dock that accommodates both Joy-Cons and the Pro Controller, which should keep your gaming area nice and tidy.

Buy Pro Controller at Amazon - $70Buy PowerA dock at Amazon - $25
PowerA Nintendo Switch Pro Controller
Kris Naudus / Engadget

When the price of the Pro Controller is a bit rich for your blood or out of stock, PowerA makes its own version with the same arrangement of buttons. The Enhanced Wireless Controller skips the rechargeable battery in favor of AAs, which has its downsides, but at least when it runs low on juice you can just pop in a new pair of batteries and get right back to gaming. Unfortunately, there’s no USB-C port to connect with so you’ll have to pair the device wirelessly — which can be finicky and may take a few tries before your Switch recognizes the controller. It also lacks vibration, so you won’t get tactile feedback in games where it’s helpful. And the plus and minus buttons are placed a bit closer to the center, so those with smaller hands will have to reach a bit further to press them.

If you’d prefer not to have to recharge — or buy batteries for — your gamepad, PowerA also makes a wired version of the same controller that connects via USB. It’s got the same look and feel, but you won’t have to struggle as much with getting your console to recognize it, and there’s no potential for wireless lag, making it ideal for fast-paced shooters and fighting games. The included cord is 10 feet long so it should reach most couches just fine.

While most third-party controllers tend to mimic the Xbox style of gamepad, anyone more familiar with the PlayStation’s distinctive DualShock design will probably prefer the $50 Pro 2 from 8BitDo. The retro-styled controller has the same general layout as the classic SNES gamepad, but adds twin thumb sticks, palm grips, back buttons, control remapping and even sensitivity adjustments. It’s truly the Swiss Army knife of Switch controllers.

Buy Enhanced Wireless controller at Amazon - $60Buy PowerA wired controller at Amazon - $23Buy 8bitdo Pro 2 at Amazon - $50

For old school gaming: Niche and retro controllers

PowerA GameCube-style controller for Switch
Kris Naudus / Engadget

Twenty years later and the preferred controller layout for Super Smash Bros. players is still the one made for the GameCube, which is why today it’s still possible to buy new gamepads straight from Nintendo. The Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Edition GameCube Controller is identical in layout and design to the original gamepads, though now it connects via USB so it can be used with the Switch. The only downside to the reissue is that it doesn’t come in a bold shade of purple anymore.

However, if you’re still sporting a classic GameCube controller with its proprietary connector, you can also pick up an adapter that will let your Switch accommodate up to four old-school gamepads. Nintendo sells one on its store, but the Y Team controller adapter is also a good alternative that costs less and can be bought at Amazon.

But you might not want to be tethered to your console — especially if you have fond memories of kicking back on your couch with a Wavebird in hand to play GameCube games like Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Killer 7. PowerA’s Nintendo GameCube-Style wireless controller is the closest you can get to recreating that feeling short of plugging a few RF dongles into a GameCube adapter.

Buy Smash Bros. controller at Amazon - $73Buy Y Team adapter at Amazon - $14Buy PowerA Game Cube-style controller at Amazon - $55
NES Switch controller
Devindra Hardawar / Engadget

What if your retro tastes go even further back, say to the NES and SNES era? If you’re subscribed to Nintendo Online, you have access to over 100 classic titles, so you might want a more “authentic” controller to use with them. Nintendo Online subscribers can buy retro-style wireless gamepads directly from the company, though the $60 set of two small, rectangular NES controllers will remind you why we’ve moved on from that design. The dog-bone shape of the $30 SNES model is more hand friendly and can still be used with the NES games, so it’s a better use of your funds should you decide you want to recreate your childhood gaming experiences.

If you don’t need an exact copy of your beloved childhood gamepads it’s worth looking at 8BitDo instead: It makes a variety of classic-styled controllers that add just enough modern features to make them useful for a wider variety of games. Its models are almost all wireless, and there are some design changes to make the controllers more comfortable and easier to use. We’ve already recommended the DualShock-like Pro 2, but the $45 SN30 Pro also offers features like dual thumb sticks and vibration in the dog-bone controller style.

If you’re looking for something more portable, however, the $25 8BitDo Lite is smaller and swaps out the thumb sticks for two D-pads, keeping the four button arrangement on each side. It’s great for 2D games and it even matches the color scheme of the Switch Lite. 

Before you try any of the controllers listed in this guide, remember to update your Switch to the latest firmware — the 8BitDo controllers will run on any version, but the PowerA gamepads need your system to run at least version 6.0.0.

Buy NES controller pack at Nintendo - $60Buy SNES controller at Nintendo - $30Buy SN30 Pro at Amazon - $45Buy 8bitdo Lite at Amazon - $25

The best Switch controllers for every player level

The Nintendo Switch is pretty popular, but its included Joy-Cons aren’t for everyone. Some players feel the detachable controllers are a bit small for their hands. Many players miss having a regular D-pad. Whatever your reasons for wanting to upgrade your Switch controller situation, know that there are alternatives — it’s just a matter of picking the one that fits your needs. We tested out a bunch of Switch controllers to see which are worth your money.

For casual gaming: Joy-Cons

Nintendo Switch Joy-Cons
Kris Naudus / Engadget

Honestly, there’s a lot to like about the included Joy-Cons. They come right in the box and can be separated from the system so two people can play. The system also includes a special gamepad grip so you can hold them in your hand like any standard controller. So if you are in fact, happy with your Joy-Cons, there’s no need to switch them out. Just tweak them a little depending on your needs. Find them a tad too small? FastSnail’s matte rubber shells can make them a little easier for large hands to hold, and Hori’s Analog Caps can make the thumb sticks grippier. 

Buy FastSnail grips at Amazon - $14Buy Hori analog caps at Amazon - $9

There’s really no good way to replace the Joy-Cons entirely with a third-party copy. Some Joy-Con-like controllers won’t connect wirelessly, while others lack key features like vibration or an NFC reader. But there are some tradeoffs that are worth it. For example, if you like to play a lot of 2D platformers in handheld mode, Hori’s D-pad controller will restore the beloved cross-shaped directional button to your gameplay. If you’re looking for something that’s also more comfortable in your hand, the company’s $50 Split Pad Pro is also worth a look. It has a D-pad on the left side and a more ergonomic grip than your standard set of Joy-Cons. But it also makes the entire assembled Switch a lot chunkier.

If you like to play your Switch with groups (or you’ve experienced the dreaded “drift” issue), chances are you’ve picked up one or two extra pairs of Joy-Cons. Which means you’re going to need a place to charge the spares. PowerA makes an excellent $25 charging station that can be plugged into your Switch dock (or any device with a USB port) and handles four Joy-Con-like controllers at once — that includes third-party gamepads as well as Nintendo’s own Switch-compatible NES controllers (see below).

Buy Hori D-pad controller at Amazon - $60Buy Split Pad Pro at Amazon - $88Buy PowerA charging dock at Amazon - $25

For action-packed games: Pro-level controllers

Nintendo Switch Pro Controller
Kris Naudus / Engadget

Sometimes you just want a standard controller to play your favorite action titles — and standard in 2020 means something like you’d get packed in with an Xbox, with grips for the heels of your hands, shoulder buttons and triggers, two thumb sticks, a set of four buttons on the right and a D-pad on the left. Nintendo knows that, which is why it created the Pro Controller. This first-party gamepad pairs easily with the Switch and features a D-pad on the left, while still maintaining features like the infrared sensor and vibration that might go missing on third-party alternatives. The only downside is the $70 price, but avid players of games like Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild will appreciate the refined controls and increased comfort.

While you can plug your Pro Controller directly into your Switch dock to charge, it’s not the most elegant solution. PowerA also makes an attractive $25 dock that accommodates both Joy-Cons and the Pro Controller, which should keep your gaming area nice and tidy.

Buy Pro Controller at Amazon - $70Buy PowerA dock at Amazon - $25
PowerA Nintendo Switch Pro Controller
Kris Naudus / Engadget

When the price of the Pro Controller is a bit rich for your blood or out of stock, PowerA makes its own version with the same arrangement of buttons. The Enhanced Wireless Controller skips the rechargeable battery in favor of AAs, which has its downsides, but at least when it runs low on juice you can just pop in a new pair of batteries and get right back to gaming. Unfortunately, there’s no USB-C port to connect with so you’ll have to pair the device wirelessly — which can be finicky and may take a few tries before your Switch recognizes the controller. It also lacks vibration, so you won’t get tactile feedback in games where it’s helpful. And the plus and minus buttons are placed a bit closer to the center, so those with smaller hands will have to reach a bit further to press them.

If you’d prefer not to have to recharge — or buy batteries for — your gamepad, PowerA also makes a wired version of the same controller that connects via USB. It’s got the same look and feel, but you won’t have to struggle as much with getting your console to recognize it, and there’s no potential for wireless lag, making it ideal for fast-paced shooters and fighting games. The included cord is 10 feet long so it should reach most couches just fine.

While most third-party controllers tend to mimic the Xbox style of gamepad, anyone more familiar with the PlayStation’s distinctive DualShock design will probably prefer the $50 Pro 2 from 8BitDo. The retro-styled controller has the same general layout as the classic SNES gamepad, but adds twin thumb sticks, palm grips, back buttons, control remapping and even sensitivity adjustments. It’s truly the Swiss Army knife of Switch controllers.

Buy Enhanced Wireless controller at Amazon - $60Buy PowerA wired controller at Amazon - $23Buy 8bitdo Pro 2 at Amazon - $50

For old school gaming: Niche and retro controllers

PowerA GameCube-style controller for Switch
Kris Naudus / Engadget

Twenty years later and the preferred controller layout for Super Smash Bros. players is still the one made for the GameCube, which is why today it’s still possible to buy new gamepads straight from Nintendo. The Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Edition GameCube Controller is identical in layout and design to the original gamepads, though now it connects via USB so it can be used with the Switch. The only downside to the reissue is that it doesn’t come in a bold shade of purple anymore.

However, if you’re still sporting a classic GameCube controller with its proprietary connector, you can also pick up an adapter that will let your Switch accommodate up to four old-school gamepads. Nintendo sells one on its store, but the Y Team controller adapter is also a good alternative that costs less and can be bought at Amazon.

But you might not want to be tethered to your console — especially if you have fond memories of kicking back on your couch with a Wavebird in hand to play GameCube games like Super Smash Bros. Brawl and Killer 7. PowerA’s Nintendo GameCube-Style wireless controller is the closest you can get to recreating that feeling short of plugging a few RF dongles into a GameCube adapter.

Buy Smash Bros. controller at Amazon - $73Buy Y Team adapter at Amazon - $14Buy PowerA Game Cube-style controller at Amazon - $55
NES Switch controller
Devindra Hardawar / Engadget

What if your retro tastes go even further back, say to the NES and SNES era? If you’re subscribed to Nintendo Online, you have access to over 100 classic titles, so you might want a more “authentic” controller to use with them. Nintendo Online subscribers can buy retro-style wireless gamepads directly from the company, though the $60 set of two small, rectangular NES controllers will remind you why we’ve moved on from that design. The dog-bone shape of the $30 SNES model is more hand friendly and can still be used with the NES games, so it’s a better use of your funds should you decide you want to recreate your childhood gaming experiences.

If you don’t need an exact copy of your beloved childhood gamepads it’s worth looking at 8BitDo instead: It makes a variety of classic-styled controllers that add just enough modern features to make them useful for a wider variety of games. Its models are almost all wireless, and there are some design changes to make the controllers more comfortable and easier to use. We’ve already recommended the DualShock-like Pro 2, but the $45 SN30 Pro also offers features like dual thumb sticks and vibration in the dog-bone controller style.

If you’re looking for something more portable, however, the $25 8BitDo Lite is smaller and swaps out the thumb sticks for two D-pads, keeping the four button arrangement on each side. It’s great for 2D games and it even matches the color scheme of the Switch Lite. 

Before you try any of the controllers listed in this guide, remember to update your Switch to the latest firmware — the 8BitDo controllers will run on any version, but the PowerA gamepads need your system to run at least version 6.0.0.

Buy NES controller pack at Nintendo - $60Buy SNES controller at Nintendo - $30Buy SN30 Pro at Amazon - $45Buy 8bitdo Lite at Amazon - $25

The best Nintendo Switch accessories you can buy

It’s shaping up to be a good year for the Nintendo Switch, with games like New Pokémon Snap, The Great Ace Attorney Chronicles and Famicom Detective Club giving us plenty of reasons to keep playing the now four year old console. The new OLED version might add a bit of extra pep to your game graphics, but a better Switch experience doesn’t have to cost $350. You can upgrade your setup with the right accessories, and we’ve got a few recommendations for different uses.

For Switches that stay at home

Nintendo Switch dock
Devindra Hardawar

The first thing you’ll want to pick up for your Switch or Switch Lite is a microSD card. After all, there are a lot of great games to download and your system has limited storage space. It’s also the only way you’ll get screen captures off your console if you haven’t connected it to Facebook or Twitter. Samsung's EVO Select line is recommended for its speed and reliability, but it’s the price that you’re likely to find most appealing, with a 256GB card running only $36 and the more spacious 512GB costing $70.

Buy Samsung Evo microSD card (256GB) at Amazon - $36Buy Samsung Evo microSD card (512GB) at Amazon - $70

It might be tempting to pick up a third-party dock for your Switch. Don’t. There have been reports of Switches getting bricked by non-Nintendo docks, which means you’re stuck with the official $100 model. However, if all you’re looking for is a change in look, you can buy a skin for your dock (and the Joy-Cons too) that will liven things up. Dbrand offers a range of bold, vibrant colors, and the skins won’t damage your Switch if removed. If you’d prefer something with a design, Slickwraps offers marble and camo patterns as well some attractive Super Nintendo and Super Famicom-themed skins.

If your Switch gets a lot of use, chances are you may have picked up some extra Joy-Cons and a Pro Controller. It’s a real pain to have to charge multiple pairs of Joy-Cons on one Switch, however, so a charging dock can be a great buy. PowerA’s Pro Controller charging dock has room for one pair of Joy-Cons and a Pro Controller, keeping them tidy and powered up. If you don’t need a place to put your Pro Controller, the regular charging dock can accommodate two sets of Joy-Cons. You can also use them for other controllers that slide onto your Switch’s rails like the official NES-style controllers or Hori’s Split Pad Pro.

Buy Dbrand skins starting at $8Buy Slickwraps starting at $35Buy PowerA charging dock at Amazon - $36

Labo VR headset
Kris Naudus / Engadget

I wasn’t a huge fan of the Labo VR kit from 2019, mostly due to its price and a lack of game support. But if you’re interested in trying out the virtual reality modes in games like Super Mario Odyssey and Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, the VR starter kit is a good purchase. It comes with the basic headset and the blaster, which was easily the most fun of all the various Labo VR projects. It usually costs around $40, but Best Buy often puts it on sale for half that amount so be sure to keep an eye out.

Buy Labo VR starter kit at Amazon - $76

For Switches that travel often

 Devindra with Switch Lite
Kris Naudus / Engadget

You’re going to need a case, that’s certain. It doesn’t need to be fancy, just enough to protect your Switch from getting bumped around in your bag. The AmazonBasics model is cheap, has 10 slots to hold additional Switch cards and a mesh pocket to store an extra charging cord or set of Joy-Cons. If you’re planning to take your entire setup, dock and all, Amazon also makes a larger storage case that can fit all the cords and controller accessories. If you need something smaller for your Switch Lite, the official case from Nintendo is incredibly slim and even comes with a screen protector. But it’s not made for carrying a lot of games. For that, we recommend TomToc’s line of Switch Lite cases, which are waterproof and come in a wide variety of colors to match your handheld for under $20.

Buy AmazonBasics case at Amazon - $10Buy AmazonBasics large case at Amazon - $27Buy TomToc case at Amazon - $18

SteelSeries Arctis 1
Kris Naudus / Engadget

You probably already have a bag that you’re carrying around all your stuff in, but if you were looking for one specifically made for your Switch, how about this backpack from HORI? It’s specifically designed to hold a Nintendo Switch and all its accessories, and comes in Pokémon, Mario and Zelda designs. The company also makes less overtly nerdy bags, but where’s the fun in that?

If Animal Crossing is more your aesthetic, Target sells a charming collection of bags emblazoned with leaf or character patterns. The backpacks have a special pocket just for your Nintendo Switch, while the clutch purses are perfectly sized for the consoles while being super stylish to boot.

Buy HORI Backpack at Amazon - $45Buy Leaf Collection Mini Backpack at Target - $30Buy Animal Crossing messenger bag at Target - $50

Whether you hate the speakers on your Switch or just don’t want to bother those around you, you’re going to need a pair of headphones to listen to your games. Ideally you want something that doesn’t cost too much and can survive a beating in your bag, so if you don’t mind wires we’re still big fans of Turtle Beach’s Recon 70, which offers great sound in an affordable, lightweight form factor. However, if you just can’t stand cords and don’t mind dropping a bit of extra cash, check out the SteelSeries Arctis 1 or Razer’s Barracuda X headsets. They both come with a USB-C receiver you can plug directly into your console for a solid wireless connection, and the sound quality of either is among the best you’ll find in any gaming headset, especially for under $150.

If you already have a pair of wireless headphones you’re particularly attached to, you can use those with your Switch or Switch Lite by plugging HomeSpot’s 5.0 Audio Transmitter Adapter into the USB-C port. It’s rather diminutive and can slip into your case easily, and very affordable at only $30.

Buy Turtle Beach Recon 70 at Amazon - $40Buy SteelSeries Arctis 1 at Amazon - $100Buy Barracuda X at Razer - $100Buy HomeSpot’s 5.0 Audio Adapter at Amazon - $30

PowerA Nano controller
Kris Naudus / Engadget

One thing you definitely have to worry about if you game on the go often is battery life, and in those cases you’ll want to carry around an extra power bank. For your Switch there are two features you need to focus on, and that’s the ability to use a USB-C cord to connect, and a slim profile so it’ll fit inside your Switch case. The RavPower 26,800mAh power bank fits both those criteria perfectly, is rather affordable at $61, and can even charge your device as you play.

Occasionally you might want to make use of the Switch’s kickstand and play with a standard gamepad. The official Pro Controller is generally accepted to be the best available, but it’s also kind of cumbersome to lug around in your bag. If you’re trying to travel a little lighter and don’t mind a slightly smaller version, PowerA’s Enhanced Nano controller can do the job. In my testing I found it’s susceptible to electrical interference, but when you’re sitting right in front of the Switch on a table it should handle the task just fine. It even comes with a little cloth bag to protect the controller from dings and scratches.

Buy 26,800mAh power bank at RavPower - $48Buy PowerA Enhanced Nano controller at Amazon - $55

The world’s tiniest functioning Game Boy Advance SP is the size of a stack of Post-Its, and it’s transparent too!





In its closed format, the FunKey S is about as small as a Tile tracker, or better still a Game Boy cartridge. Designed to emulate the Game Boy experience, the FunKey S comes pre-loaded with a whole bunch of favorite titles for endless hours of retro-entertainment. It’s tiny enough to fit on your keychain, lightweight enough to be carried everywhere, and satisfyingly just like the real deal, except smaller. Oh, and it comes in a transparent color-way too, taking you back to those good-old-days!

Click Here to Buy Now

Built right into the FunKey S are emulators of dozens of your favorite retro consoles, including the NES, SNES, Game Boy, Game Boy Color, Game Boy Advance, Sega Master System, Sega Genesis (Megadrive), Sega Game Gear, Playstation 1, Atari Lynx, WonderSwan, and the Neo Geo Pocket. It’s just a testament to how far we’ve come, considering everything fits within a device that’s no larger than a Graham Cracker. The mini-console comes with an ARM chip, has an SD card slot that doesn’t just run but saves games too, and a MicroUSB for side-loading your own games to play.

The tiny device looks and functions just like a Game Boy Advance SP would. Flip to open it and you’ve got a miniaturized console that’s true to the GBA experience. It comes outfitted with all the buttons (including L1 and R1 shoulder buttons), a 1.54-inch 240×240 IPS LCD screen (with a 50Hz refresh rate too), and even built-in 0.5W speakers! The console boots up as soon as you flip open the lid, and will even save your progress before powering down when you close the lid!

The FunKey S is entirely open-source, which means it even invites developers to tinker with it, modding games, building games, and maximizing the FunKey’s experience. Especially for its size, the FunKey S is a highly entertaining little gadget. I’ll refrain from calling it a toy although it almost certainly is one (especially with those candy colors), because I see it as a marvel of technology too. The gadget supports up to 128Gb of storage, which means you could potentially put tens of thousands of games into your console and carry it around with you. It comes with a lanyard hole and can easily be strung to your keychain, and at €65 ($77.5), it’s honestly an absolute bargain! Although would it be too much if I asked for an HDMI output so I could connect this to a larger screen?!

Designer: Funkey Project

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Modder Turned Nintendo’s Virtual Boy into a Handheld

The Virtual Boy was Nintendo’s ill-fated attempt to create a 3D virtual reality gaming system back in the 1990s. The system required that gamers align their eyes with a tabletop viewer, much like those things they make you look into when you get a vision test at the DMV. It produced red-on-black images using LEDs and rapidly moving mirrors, and was controlled with an external joystick that you couldn’t look at while your eyes peered into the headset. Now, more than 25 years later, a talented modder has managed to build a completely working version of the Virtual Boy as a handheld.

Shank Mods says he spent almost a year on his “Real Boy” conversion, which incorporates an authentic Virtual Boy motherboard and is not an emulator. It takes real Virtual Boy cartridges, displays them on a modern LCD screen, and has a built-in controller with bright red LED backlighting. The build required creating several custom circuit boards and developing code for the custom controller circuit. The whole thing is wrapped up in a custom red and black 3D printed case.

Shank explains how the original Virtual Boy worked and the challenges in converting it to a handheld in the video below:

Awesome build, Shank!

[via HackADay]

This Nintendo Switch 2 foldable concept makes it the ultimate Android gaming tablet

Nintendo Switch 2 Foldable Android Gaming Tablet

Think of it as the natural successor to the Nintendo Switch, and the clamshell-style Nintendo DS before it.

Sure, Nintendo’s probably going to announce the Switch Pro console very soon, but entertain the idea of a world where the Switch isn’t just a console, it’s an all-in-one tablet and gaming device. Designed by Alessandro Cesa and Nicola Pizzato, this conceptual Nintendo Switch 2 device makes a great case for how the company can fill a pretty big void in the gaming tablet market. The Nintendo Switch 2 comes with a dual-hinge folding mechanism (sort of like the Microsoft Duo) that creates a gap in between the two folding components… a gap wide enough to dock the Switch’s joy-cons. Moreover, the Switch 2 even sports a sprawling folding display that turns it into a full-size tablet when open. You could hold it as you would a Nintendo DS, or open it out and play games on a larger screen with the joy-cons in each hand, just like you would with a Nintendo Switch.

Nintendo Switch 2 Foldable Android Gaming Tablet

We all know that the Switch runs on a customized version of Android already, which makes it really easy for the Switch 2 to be more than just a gaming device. The large touchscreen display is perfect for everything from playing Animal Crossing to watching content on Netflix and YouTube. The joy-cons, which sit inside the tablet like bookmarks, can easily be removed when needed, and used as either game-controllers, or remote controls. The fact that they sit INSIDE the Switch would probably indicate that they charge wirelessly, using a reverse wireless charging technology built into the tablet.

Nintendo Switch 2 Foldable Android Gaming Tablet

Nintendo Switch 2 Foldable Android Gaming Tablet

The Switch 2 tablet and controllers take on a rather familiar design, with flat edges just like the iPad. The joy-cons sport battery indicators on the side, and have a unique design where the main buttons and the analog thumbsticks sit below the controller’s upper surface, protecting the screen from getting scratched or damaged when shut.

Nintendo Switch 2 Foldable Android Gaming Tablet

To expand its tablet functionality, the Switch 2 even comes with its own docked stylus, pitting it against the iPad Pro as a serious gaming and productivity device. The stylus docks in on the right side of the tablet, while the left comes with a slot for gaming cartridges, keeping the analog appeal of a gaming console very much alive!

Nintendo Switch 2 Foldable Android Gaming Tablet

Nintendo Switch 2 Foldable Android Gaming Tablet

Nintendo Switch 2 Foldable Android Gaming Tablet

That hinge is perhaps one of the most interesting details on the Switch 2. It folds the screen with a much broader curvature, so you’re not left with that godforsaken crease when you open it up. The folded version of the tablet also creates a perfect gap to dock the joy-cons. The Switch 2 also comes with a single-lens camera, a 3.5mm jack, and a USB-C port for charging it or hooking it to a variety of other devices. The designers even created a two-part case for the Switch 2 concept, with iPad-style foldable panels that allow it to dock at an angle as you play games or browse the internet on it!

Designers: Alessandro Cesa & Nicola Pizzato

Nintendo Switch 2 Foldable Android Gaming Tablet

Nintendo Switch 2 Foldable Android Gaming Tablet

Nintendo Switch 2 Foldable Android Gaming Tablet

Nintendo Switch 2 Foldable Android Gaming Tablet