Clear Resin Moon and Mars Keycaps: The Eagle Has Landed (on Your Desktop)

To celebrate some of humanity’s greatest achievements in space exploration (and sell some cool keycaps in the process), these are Moon Keys. Compatible with Cherry MX switches and clones, the keycaps are available in five varieties: a 1u Eagle Has Landed, Lunar Lander, and Curiosity Rover ($49), and 1.75u Eagle Has Landed ($52), and 2.25u Curiosity Rover ($58). You know, I was just thinking my keyboard could use more of a space theme.

Which is your favorite? I think I’m going to get all the moon ones. And all the Mars ones. That’s $258 in keycaps for those of you keeping track, instantly making it the most expensive component of my computer. Also the best looking.

The keys are available for pre-order now with an estimated shipping date of November 12th, or just in time to show up in the mail, and for me to have completely forgotten I ordered them in the first place. Like a time-traveling surprise gift to myself.

GMK Dualshot 2 PlayStation-themed Keycap Set: 108-bit

Keyboard accessory maker Omnitype’s latest keycap set features the dull gray base color of the original PlayStation, along with the colors of the OG PS logo. You can almost hear the startup sound when you look at it. If you’re wondering why it’s called the Dualshot 2, that’s because this is the second run of the set. It’s easy to see why it’s back. The base set is all gray, with only the lettering on the modifier keys bearing the PlayStation logo colors. There are however specialty keys sold separately that are entirely coated in bright red, yellow, teal, and blue. There’s also a variant of the base set with katakana characters, and a novelty set that features PlayStation button names and terms.

I wonder why they don’t have a blue X and a red O. You can pre-order the GMK Dualshot 2 from Omnitype only until June 4, 2021. The base set, which should have enough keys for most keyboards, will set you back $120 (USD). Omnitype also has other Dualshot 2 merch: a macro pad, a chrome or Rama key, and a desk mat.

Max Keyboard Offer Custom Printed Keycap Sets: Goodbye Group Buy

Mechanical keyboards have exploded in popularity in recent years, including swappable keycaps. You can easily find mass-produced keycap sets online, but if you truly want to stand out or have trendy or niche designs, your best bets are limited run or artisan keycaps. Aside from being expensive, custom keycaps are often made by small businesses that have to meet minimum orders. That’s why custom keycap designers or shops usually resort to group buys — limited-time full-price pre-orders that are announced in forums several months or even a year before they are produced and delivered. But if you’re willing to make a few compromises, you can design and order your own custom keycap set with Max Keyboard.

Max Keyboard sells entire mechanical keyboards, keyboard parts, and yes, custom keycaps. For the latter, you can choose between a 60%, TKL, or full set. The configurator has a limited selection of keycap fonts, colors, and modifier key names. But its flexibility comes in their downloadable keycap image templates that let you create and upload your own keycap designs, such as the ones in these pictures.

The keycap sets consist of Cherry MX keys. You can choose to have prints on the top, side, or both. You can also choose the size of the spacebar. I have not tried ordering from Max Keyboard, but from what I can see, their configurator has a basic preview and so requires a bit of imagination. But with prices starting at just $25 (USD), this is definitely worth considering.

[via randomfrankp]

Inspired by Westworld, the Am Hatsu is the world’s first split keyboard with an organic metal body

Look at the Am Hatsu keyboard and it instantly feels like it was fabricated by highly advanced robotic equipment. Part organic, part futuristic, the split keyboard was inspired by the sci-fi series Westworld. Its unique surface and key placement help relieve wrist pain while allowing you to sort of look like a cyborg as you browse the interwebs.

The Am Hatsu’s organically shaped metal surface is the result of 5-axis simultaneous CNC machining, an expensive fabrication technique that yields pretty remarkable results. The organic keyboard layout sits on a low-poly metal base, within which lies the keyboard’s internal hardware. The Am Hatsu runs on a low-frequency communication protocol that allows both keyboards to communicate with each other as well as your input device (laptop, desktop, tablet, etc) in real-time, ensuring that there’s absolutely zero lag between both keyboards while you type. “This ensures the best performance when it comes to power consumption, anti-interference ability, and latency”, says Angry Miao, the company behind Am Hatsu.

The keyboard was launched under Angry Miao’s “Make Art Not Tech” vision. It takes its inspiration from the intro sequence of HBO’s Westworld, where multiple specialized tissue-printing robots come together to build a living bionic man. The keyboard’s curved surface pays tribute to the sci-fi series while also aiming at enabling a much more comfortable typing experience by allowing your wrists to rest in their natural position. The unconventional 4×6 key layout also minimizes repeated movement of fingers, allowing you to type effortlessly.

The Am Hatsu is by no means your regular consumer-tech device. Its specialized manufacturing methods and state-of-the-art internals bring the keyboard’s price up to a mind-bending $1600 per unit. Early-bird purchasers will receive a special 20% discount by acquiring an NFT to authenticate their pre-order, although given how expensive it is to make one of these keyboards, your deposit is only eligible for a refund before July 29th – when production begins. The keyboard is limited to just 100 units in this initial run, so if you’ve got an arm and a leg to spare… although wait, you’ll need both arms to type!

Designer: Angry Miao

BlackBerry is still alive… And its latest smartphone will have 5G and even a physical keyboard





It seems like BlackBerry still has some fight left in it! After being unceremoniously dumped by TCL following a failed 4-year license agreement, BlackBerry partnered with OnwardMobility, a mobile security company, to work on its upcoming line of smartphones. In August last year, OnwardMobility issued a press release highlighting that they would be launching a “5G BlackBerry Android smartphone with a physical keyboard in North America and Europe.” The company even stated that they would be partnering with Foxconn subsidiary FIH Mobile Limited to design and manufacture these smartphones. As we gradually approach the launch of these phones, Jermaine Smit (better known as his internet alias Concept Creator) has partnered with LetsGoDigital to envision what these phones will probably look like… and let’s just say, they’re about as long as a meatball sub.

Ask any Max-sized iPhone users what an annoyance it is to reach the back button on the top-left corner of a screen and you’ll probably figure out that smartphones are already pretty big to begin with. The Blackberry Key 3 concept adds a further 1.5 inches to the smartphone’s height with a dedicated, physical, touch-sensitive keyboard. Now I don’t mean to dunk on the Key 3, the physical keyboard has always been BlackBerry’s schtick… but maybe a slide-out keyboard would work better for a smartphone in today’s world. That aside, the Key 3 looks rather impressive.

The BlackBerry Key 3 concept comes with a profile that’s reminiscent of the Note 20 Ultra. It features a flat surface on the top and bottom, while cascading edges on the sides result in a phone that’s comfortable to hold, along with a waterfall display, there may be a chance of the phone registering accidental palm touches. The camera setup on the back features 3 lenses and a flash, looking quite similar to the one found on the OnePlus 8, and sitting right beneath that is the familiar BlackBerry logo. Flip the phone back over to the front and it kind of looks slightly meme-ish. It’s obscenely long, considering the screen’s already 20:9 to begin with. Adding to that is a slight forehead bezel (which features a single front-facing camera) and a massive chin, which houses a full QWERTY keyboard. The QWERTY keyboard, from what I can tell, is a part of the display, but it’s always there… even when you don’t need it. Sort of like the soft keys often found on Android phones, the keyboard is static in its position, and can easily be used when you need to type. This ideally means a keyboard never blocks or overlaps elements on the screen, so you’re always treated to a full-screen interface all the time. I’m not entirely sure if the keyboard’s layout is dynamic, i.e., whether it changes to reveal emojis or other languages, but if I were a betting man, that would honestly be a pretty remarkable feature. I could even imagine having app-specific controls, like playback controls for YouTube and Netflix, or gaming controls while you play games (reminds me of the LG Wing if I’m being honest). There are a few undeniable perks to owning a BlackBerry phone, and I’d say the Key 3’s no different. Aside from the keyboard, BlackBerry phones are known to have a much higher security standard than your regular Android or iOS device. If you can somehow look past the length of this phone, the Key 3 could actually be a compelling device to a certain subset of people. Besides, look to the base and you’ll even notice a 3.5mm headphone jack!!

Designer: Concept Creator (Jermain Smit) for LetsGoDigital

A closer look at the camera module, which looks heavily borrowed from the OnePlus 8. There’s no reason to believe that the original BlackBerry phone will sport the same camera module, so we can write this one off as Concept Creator’s own personal touch. That being said, if the BlackBerry did have a camera that was as good as the OnePlus 8, it would still be leaps and bounds ahead of what they’ve currently got.

From the looks of it, the phone sports a brushed metal back, which would probably mean no wireless charging. There is, however, a Type-C port on the base… and I may be sounding like a broken record here, but I’m still pretty impressed by the fact that flagship phones in 2021 can still have 3.5mm jacks!

There’s no indication of what this concept’s dimensions are, although it’s worth remembering that the BlackBerry Key 3 is just a fan-made concept phone. OnwardMobility announced that BlackBerry would launch its 2021 smartphone sometime in the first half of the year, so if things are still going according to schedule, the phone should ideally be announced in the next 2 months or so!

Image Credits – LetsGoDigital

An iPhone with a Nokia-style sliding keyboard would make more sense than a folding phone

It’s the year 2005, and Nokia’s E-Series phones have a cult following that’s difficult to ignore. The phones came with a relatively large-ish screen, but what really sealed the deal was the fact that you could slide the screen to reveal a nifty, usable QWERTY keyboard underneath. Before the iPhone became the computer in your pocket, the Nokia E-Series phones were the computers in everyone’s pockets. The E stood for Executive, and it wasn’t uncommon to see businessmen in suits strutting down the road with Nokia phones in their hand and Jabra earpieces in one ear. It was the iPhone and AirPods combo, nearly 15 years prior.

I think the fundamental problem with the smartphone touchscreen isn’t its size, it’s how we use it. Screens have a finite amount of space for infinite amounts of data, which makes designing interfaces really complicated, and using them even more so. In that regard, just empirically, a bigger screen on a smartphone doesn’t make it ‘better’… which is why this concept by Johan Gustafsson feels so refreshing. In a world where smartphones are finding new ways to push more pixels into a smartphone, Gustafsson’s iPhone Q brings a level of sensibility to that computer in your pocket – by simply making it a miniature computer!

The iPhone Q (named after the fact that it comes with a dedicated QWERTY keyboard) presents a bold ‘new’ vision for the iPhone. I use the word ‘new’ in air-quotes because while adding a dedicated tactile keyboard to a phone isn’t new, it’s new for the iPhone, and more importantly, it presents a new format as smartphone companies desperately try to make their phones look less blockish and more gimmicky. In a world of folding phones with creased displays, pathetic battery-lives, and clunky bodies, the iPhone Q feels like that perfect premium, enterprise-grade smartphone to pair with the iPad Pro or the MacBook Pro. The phone comes sans a notch, but makes up for the lack of a front-facing camera with a complete tactile keyboard right underneath the screen. The screen slides upwards in landscape mode, revealing the 42-key keyboard below, which can be used as a much more functional alternative to the on-screen keyboard, allowing you to quickly replay to messages and send out emails in a jiffy. A dual-lens camera on the back reinforces the fact that the iPhone Q is less of a multimedia device, and more of a piece of functional hardware, designed for a niche of executive users.

Sure, the iPhone Q is just a concept, but even conceptually, it feels much more contextual and sensible than a folding iPhone with a larger screen. Quite like the iPhone Pro, designed for professional media-creators, the iPhone Q serves a niche group of users, becoming a perfect alternative to people who still use BlackBerries. Sure, they may be a small group RIGHT NOW, but if the iPhone did sport a dedicated slide-out keyboard, I’m pretty sure a lot of executives and office-goers would promptly make the shift!

Designer: Johan Gustafsson

Add a Touchbar to your keyboard with this sleek, infinitely customizable touchscreen gadget!





The Touchbar on the MacBook honestly felt like a solution without a concrete problem. It was designed to be a highlight feature without a highlight purpose, and was probably reduced to being something that people used just as a volume slider while watching videos. The Touchbar, in my opinion, failed because it lacked the two C’s – Context, and Customizability. CORSAIR’s iCUE NEXUS fixes that with its infinitely customizable little keyboard attachment that does anything from work as a miniature app launcher to a control panel, to even an always-on ticker tape that lets you see your computer stats or the GameStop stock price!

The CORSAIR iCUE NEXUS forms a modular add-on to CORSAIR’s line of high-end performance and gaming gear. The nifty little gadget can be used independently or snapped right to the top of a selection of CORSAIR keyboards, turning them into command-centers. Powered by the company’s iCUE software, the gadget’s screen can be entirely customized, fitting as many as 6 different buttons or modules into it to suit your needs. You can create custom layouts that change based on the program you’re running, and the capacitive-touch display lets you do everything from tapping to sliding. The screen measures 5-inches diagonally, and comes with a resolution of 640×48. The iCUE NEXUS’s power, however, lies in its contextual flexibility, letting you control practically any aspect of your computer with it. As mentioned earlier, you could use it to launch programs, but you could even control options within each program, changing features, display settings, or even controlling your computer audio with it. Moreover, it ties in with CORSAIR’s other equipment too, letting you customize and change color layouts on your keyboard, mouse, and desktop, activate or mute your headphone’s microphone, or even monitor your machine’s performance and control aspects like fan-speed, etc. With the ability to customize up to 256 screens at once, the iCUE NEXUS promises to do what the Touchbar could not. It focuses heavily on context, while giving you an infinite world of customizability.

Designer: CORSAIR

GeForce RTX 3080 Graphics Card Keycap Has a Spinnable Fan

Designed by Etsy seller Keycapper to replicate the look of NVIDIA’s high-performance GeForce RTX 3080 graphics card, this is a metal keycap designed to fit the right shift key of keyboards with Cherry MX switches. It costs $50 and includes a fan you can spin with a finger, making it an integrated keyboard fidget spinner!

You’ll have to be quite a fan of the GeForce RTX 3080 to actually spend $50 on a keycap that looks just like it. Of course, if you’re spending $800+ on a graphics card (if you can even find one), what’s another $50 for a matching keycap? Besides, that’s a small price to pay to be the envy of everybody who even knows what an RTX 3080 is (I thought it was a new Acura SUV).

My right shift key doesn’t even have a keycap, I just know where it is because it’s the button that’s missing a keycap right below the return key that’s also missing its keycap. None of the number keys work at all, so I have to copy and paste them from Notepad whenever I need to use them, which I avoid. Is it time for a new keyboard? Not yet, but I feel like I am getting close.

[via ThisIsWhyImBroke]

The HyperX Alloy Origins 60 is a small-but-mighty gaming keyboard

Maybe it’s because our homes are feeling increasingly cramped, but 60 percent keyboards seem to be coming into vogue. Those are decks that not only lack a number pad, but also jettison all the function keys and miscellanea like the “scroll lock” and...

Apple’s Magic Keyboard for iPad drops to $199 at Amazon

It’s now decidedly more affordable to get the combo of an iPad and a Magic Keyboard — if you act quickly, at least. Amazon is selling the Magic Keyboard for the iPad Air and 11-inch iPad Pro (no Pencil included) for $199, a full $100 below the usual...