Let’s forget about folding displays for a bit and admire Insta360’s folding camera!

The idea behind the Evo’s design is a simple, but unique one. 3D cameras and 360° cameras have one thing in common… the presence of at least two lenses. Where those lenses face in relation with each other, and the type of lens determines the kind of media you capture. Lenses that sit side by side (with a rough distance of 2.5 inches between them) can capture two different channels corresponding to the left and right eye, creating a sense of depth, and therefore a 3-dimensional video or image. Lenses (usually at least 180° fisheye) that face in opposite directions can capture an entire scene in 360 degrees, allowing you to create videos or images you can look around in and immerse yourself into. The Insta360 Evo simply creates a mechanism in which these two lenses can fold to either face in the same direction or the opposite, allowing the camera to alternate between shooting in 3D and in 360°.

The Evo can record 3D 5K/30fps video (or 18-megapixel stills) with a 180-degree field of view, viewable using a VR headset that comes in the box, or an innovative HoloFrame case that sits on your phone, turning your phone’s screen into a 3D display. Fold the cameras to face opposite each other and the camera captures 360° videos and stills that you can view in your VR headset, even looking around to see things behind, beside, above or below you.

What’s even more remarkable about the Evo is its ability to not just record, but also stabilize video. Using its 6-axis gyroscopic stabilization system, Evo’s videos are immersive, crisp, and jitter free. The FlowState stabilization system even allows the Evo to capture time-lapses that are incredibly smooth. Whether you’re walking on the footpath or on a bumpy trail, the Evo can capture videos without needing an external gimbal or stabilizer (the gimbal would end up getting captured in 360° videos too). A simple flip/fold mechanism allows you to transition between shooting in 3D and shooting in VR, allowing you to create fully immersive video content, and the Evo even packs kits, headsets, and cases that let you and your audience properly view the content you’ve created!

Designer: Insta360

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Image Credits: TuttoAndroid

Light waves allow scientists to 3D print with multiple materials

3D printing can already create sensors for NASA rovers, rocket engines, safer football helmets, dentures. Name it, and it seems like it can be 3D printed. But the technology is still pretty limited, partly because most 3D printing systems can only ma...

NVIDIA will stop supporting 3D glasses in April

Have you noticed that stereoscopic 3D is out of vogue, at least at home? So has NVIDIA. The graphics chip designer has unveiled plans to drop support for 3D Vision, its approach to gaming with 3D glasses. The last drivers to support 3D Vision will...

Apple quietly bought Lighthouse’s AI home security camera patents

When Lighthouse's intelligent security camera finally went on sale just over a year ago, the company believed that with AI recognition and 3D sensing technology, it offered something truly unique over its rivals. However, the promise of automatic fac...

Bringing the wonder of old-school survey maps into three dimensions

Mapping technology is infinitely better than it used to be, but satellites and LiDAR can never recapture the craft that went into making old-school US Geological Survey Maps. Instead, graphic designer Scott Reinhard is trying to bring a modern touch...

Fox Sports’ new virtual studio runs on Unreal Engine

It's no secret that Epic Games has enabled a number of gaming studios to create more-realistic visuals with its Unreal game engine. Since its debut in 1998, powering the first-person shooter Unreal, the technology has evolved to power hundreds of gam...

The Looking Glass makes sci-fi movie-style holograms a reality

The disclaimer at the very beginning of the video should be indication enough that the things you are about to see will blow your minds away. After decades of watching 3D holographic projections in movies like the Star Wars franchise, a Kickstarter project is bringing the promise of three-dimensional virtual imagery to life. No VR/AR headsets, no 3D glasses, no gimmicks, the Looking Glass display can actually showcase visual content in 3D, to the naked eye. Not only does the content being displayed on the screen have a z-axis, showing depth, it also responds to parallax, meaning that depending on where you’re viewing the display from, you see a different angle of the 3D file.

The Looking Glass pulls this fest off using its proprietary lenticular display that combines 45 angles of any given 3D model into one, allowing you to look at the model’s front, sides, top, and bottom. While the display is a thick chunk of glass, the results are far ahead of other conventional 3D displays. The thick lenticular screen comes in two sizes, and requires a laptop or desktop to power it. Using an HDMI cable to transfer data and a USB-C cable for power, the Looking Glass supports OBJ, FBX, STL, and gLTF formats, while working with softwares like Maya, Zbrush, Blender, Tinkercad, and Solidworks to provide live viewing of 3D files.

Currently, the Looking Glass is positioned to revolutionize any profession relying on CAD modeling, be it architecture, industrial design, or even game design. The display also offers the ability to connect to a Nintendo Switch joycon or a Leap Controller, allowing you to even interact with your models in a way that’s unprecedented. Having just completed crowdfunding on Kickstarter, the Looking Glass is estimated to deliver as soon as September 2018. If it does go mainstream, we may just skip the entire VR headset phase of 3D modeling!

Designer: Shawn Frayne

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What if we grew our fruits to be shaped as containers?

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I remember one snarky image that made its rounds around the internet. It featured peeled oranges stored in plastic containers, with a caption that read “If only nature could find a way to cover these oranges so we didn’t need to waste so much plastic on them”. It seemed like a glorious act of stupidity, that someone at the supermarket would peel fruits, discarding their natural packaging, and then store them in man-made plastic boxes… so Brooklyn-based design studio Crème did the exact opposite.

Crème chose to reverse the process, forming fruits into containers, rather than the opposite (storing fruits in them). Using the easy-to-grow and tough-when-dry gourd, Crème created specialized 3D-printed molds that allowed the gourd to grow in certain shapes. Gourds are fast-growing plants that bear robust fruit each season. Once dried, the gourds’ strong outer skin and fibrous inner flesh becomes watertight, explaining why they’ve been used for centuries as water-storage and drinking vessels.

Crème has devised a method of mass-growing these gourds, forming them into glasses and carafes, using 3D printed molds that limit the growth of the gourd and give it shape (the Japanese do the same with watermelon, making them cubical and therefore easy to pack). Once the gourd dries out, the mold is opened, the fruit is cut, and its insides cleaned. You’re left with the HyO-Cup… a product that’s watertight, and formed with a surprising amount of accuracy. If the molds are designed well, you can achieve any shape, making stylized containers, or even more functional, stackable designs. Once done, instead of going into a landfill, the HyO-Cups go into a composting pit!

Designer: Crème

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