Apple just filed a patent for a new MacBook design with its own integrated Apple Pencil

Earlier this week, a patent filed by Apple at the US Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) was discovered that outlined a schematic for a MacBook with a new input device – the Apple Pencil. According to the patent images, the pencil would conveniently sit docked within the keyboard when not in use, and could be easily popped out and used as an input device, either on the screen or the trackpad. Apart from being a mouse-alternative, the patent even mentions that the pencil would provide extra features to the MacBook like F-key functionality.

Based on these patent drawings, I decided to put a 3D model together and take it for a spin. Conceptually, the presence of an Apple Pencil within a MacBook feels confusing but also potentially exciting. The minute you introduce a pencil to the MacBook, you’re singlehandedly killing the iPad Pro’s upper edge, but the more you think about it, the more it feels like it just might work. A Mac”Book” and a “Pencil” just instinctively go together, like a notebook and a pencil, right? Besides, it creates a synergy between the two products, and I can just imagine Craig Federighi dragging files from the iPad Pro with a Pencil onto the MacBook and having them carry over from one device to another, extending the user experience of Apple’s Universal Control feature!

Potentially (at least according to the schematics in the patent), the Pencil or ‘Pencil-like device’ would sit right above the keyboard, replacing the area originally reserved for the largely ignored Touch Bar. At least for the concept, I’ve shrunk down the Touch Bar instead of removing it entirely. For now, it sits in the top right corner, between the Pencil’s docking area and the Touch ID button.

The Pencil or ‘input tool’ would sit within the MacBook’s magnetic docking area, charging while not in use. Pop it out and I’d imagine you could use it on both the screen as well as the trackpad, although Patently Apple’s article doesn’t really highlight usage. It does, however, show that the Pencil is no ordinary stylus. This new input device would have multiple buttons or touch-zones on it, allowing it to double up as a row of Function keys when docked, and even letting you calibrate/control settings like your screen’s brightness, media volume, or more specifically brush sizes as you sketch on the MacBook screen.

However, like all patents, this one should be taken with a pinch of salt too. Most patents serve a singular purpose – of protecting intellectual property. They aren’t indicative of what Apple plans on rolling out to the public, although my gut tells me the Pencil is due for a redesign too, so maybe it isn’t too farfetched to assume that new touch-features could be coming to the Apple Pencil. As for being able to dock a stylus inside your MacBook, the patent document (which can be found below) and these images are all I have to offer!

Visualizer: Sarang Sheth

Patent discovered by Patently Apple

This Polaroid camera comes with an inbuilt stylus that lets you doodle on your photos before they print

Looks like the Galaxy Note and the instant camera had a baby! Meet the NOTIC, a camera concept that takes instant photography to the next level. While most instant cameras are a mere two-step effort – clicking and printing (or developing if you’re pedantic), NOTIC adds a third intermediary step that lets you customize your photos before they print. The camera’s built-in stylus lets you doodle on your photos, adding notes, emojis, sketches, etc. to give your photo a more heartfelt, personal touch.

The NOTIC camera concept is roughly modeled on the format of the Fujifilm Instax series, with its almost boxy appearance. It comes with a viewfinder in the top corner that lets you compose your shot, a flash for dark scenes, and an autofocus sensor that ensures your images are crystal clear. Once you’ve clicked the picture, a screen on the back of the camera displays your photo (which you can either accept or reject), and a pop-out-stylus built into the side of the camera lets you doodle on your photo before printing it out. Just experientially, it feels a lot like doodling on an Instagram story or a Snapchat snap before posting it, except this isn’t really ephemeral. Once you accept your final result, the photo develops on the instant film which slowly makes its way out of the top of the camera.

Designer: Jinwoo Jang

The stylus isn’t just a mere pen-shaped hunk of plastic either. It comes with buttons that let you toggle the stroke-width of your brush and even a button on top that lets you swap between brush and eraser.

This nifty gadget turns any laptop or desktop monitor into a massive iPad Pro and Stylus




Plug the Hello X3 in the top left corner of any display (or any flat surface) and suddenly you have a stylus-capable screen that you can draw on, annotate against, and present with.

Up until just 5 minutes ago, I was ready to throw a little over a grand at a new, 12.9-inch M1 iPad Pro and the Apple Pencil. I’m honestly reconsidering now after stumbling across this $120 gadget that transforms any flat surface into a stylus-friendly touchscreen. Titled the YELANG Hello X3, this 3-axis-shaped device plugs onto the corner of any flat rectangular surface (although it’s much more useful when mounted on a display), practically turning it into an iPad. The Hello X3 works with displays as large as 27-inches, and comes along with a pressure-sensitive stylus too to rival the Apple Pencil.

Click Here to Buy Now: $120 $189 (37% off) Hurry! Just 14 hours left!

Currently in its third generation (hence the X3 suffix), the Hello X3 expands on what its previous generations could do. It comes with a camera-sensor that can now read surface areas that are anywhere between 10-27 inches, has 2mm precision (which is alright, to be honest), a 120 fps response time, and here’s the best part, compatibility with both Macintosh and Windows-based systems. Just plug it onto your iMac or your Windows desktop monitor and you’ve got yourself a massive tablet PC that you can sketch on, make models in, edit documents, sign papers, or even use in a bunch of other productivity apps and softwares. If you’re traveling, the Hello X3 plugs right off and is portable enough to be carried right in your bag along with the stylus.

The Hello X3’s universal design is perhaps its biggest selling point, but it’s also matched by the fact that setting it up on a new device is ridiculously simple. Just pop the gadget on the top-left of the screen (it works with left-handed as well as right-handed users), plug it in via USB, and you’re ready to calibrate it. To calibrate the Hello X3 to your screen, just tap the 4 corners of the display with the stylus and you’re done. The stylus is thick and grippy like a marker or a fountain-pen, and sports a pressure-sensitive tip that can make thicker strokes if you press harder and thinner strokes if you lightly touch a surface. In just minutes, your 4K monitor turns into a graphics tablet.

The Hello X3 works with regular surfaces too. If you’re not really comfortable with drawing on vertical surfaces (which, let’s face it, can get uncomfortable), just plug the Hello X3 onto a drawing pad or a clipboard and you’ve got yourself a makeshift tablet PC (remember the Wacom Intuos?). This setup works rather well when you’re using a projector too, instead of a laptop or a desktop monitor. Each Hello X3 comes along with its own drawing-board for good measure, and a stand for your stylus when it’s not in use. The stylus has a standby time of 120 days, and a use-time of 4 hours, although it charges completely in just under 30 minutes. The YELANG Hello X3 is currently in its final hours of funding and is set to ship as early as September. Grab it at its special early-bird price of $120 on Kickstarter!

Click Here to Buy Now: $120 $189 (37% off) Hurry! Just 14 hours left!

elago’s Apple Pencil protective case turns your stylus into a nostalgic rubber-tip graphite pencil

I don’t know about you, but those generic yellow pencils with pink erasers were a very strong part of my childhood. I practically grew up on them, developed a love for sketching, took on a career in Industrial Design, and I’m finally here, reliving those fond memories through elago’s Apple Pencil cover cases.

Designed to evoke a sense of nostalgia, elago’s Apple Pencil (2nd Gen) covers come with that familiar hexagonal pencil aesthetic, complete with the rubber-tip at the back. Slip them onto your Pencil and apart from giving you a blast from the past, the covers enhance your grip, thanks to the silicone construction, and protect your hardware from accidental drops and scratches. Moreover, the cover is compatible with the iPad Pro and even supports charging the Pencil by magnetically attaching it to the side of your tablet!

Designer: elago

Click Here to Buy Now

Click Here to Buy Now

This UVC sterilizer + touch stylus is the COVID age’s latest go-to everyday carry!

Cell phone? Check. Wallet? Check. Masks? Check, check. UVC sterilizer? Check. Nowadays, leaving the house is synonymous with being prepared to ward off any prospective germs outside. Adopting more hygienic practices after entering your home and while outside has become the norm in today’s world and designers are quickly catching on to it. Bringing their design into the mix, Hyeri Lee recently created a touch stylus with an integrated UVC sterilizer in collaboration with SAQ Design called Keepstick.

Keepstick works like any stylus might, albeit slightly thicker than the average stylus, granting users the ability to do daily activities like push elevator buttons, make credit card payments, or even use their smartphone without having to touch any of the items’ physical surfaces. UVC light is able to sterilize contaminated surfaces by using Ultraviolet-C radiation to break down certain chemical bonds that allow microorganisms to multiply. With this in mind, Keepstick not only keeps your fingers away from collecting germs from any given surface but also allows you to sterilize handheld items like your smartphone, wallet, and keys.

Keepstick comes with its own plastic box where users can store items to be sterilized. By attaching the Keepstick’s UVC light feature onto the box, Ultraviolet-C rays spread over the item inside the box to break down the chemical bonds that could contain germs or viral bacteria. Even your disposable masks can be worn more than once they’ve been sterilized by Keepstick. The UVC sterilizer touch stick is also compatible with USB-C charging ports so it can always be charged up before walking out the front door.

Designer: Hyeri Lee x SAQ Design

Keepstick was designed to supplement other means for germ-fighting like hand sanitizer.

Through plenty of ideations, Keepstick finally assumed the form of a compact, thick stylus that opens up to a UVC sterilizer.

Once detached, Keepstick transforms from your regular touch stylus to a UVC sterilizer.

Ultraviolet-C radiation breaks down certain chemical bonds that allow microorganisms to multiply.

Hyeri Lee equipped Keepstick with the ability to be worn around the neck for easy carrying.

Detach Keepstick to sterilize disposable items such as gloves and masks.

Apple patent reveals a new type of Pencil with replaceable nibs for different creative applications

Watch out, Wacom and Adobe! In a new patent granted to Apple by the US Patent and Trademark Office, the company is reportedly looking at a next-generation Apple Pencil with swappable nib modules. While the patent doesn’t exclusively outline what these nibs would look like or be used for, it focuses more on the underlying technology, which would allow nibs to connect to the pencil handle via a special lightning-style connector.

The Apple Pencil is arguably the iPad Pro‘s secret sauce. Along with the Pencil, the iPad Pro becomes the ultimate creator’s setup (for both 2D as well as 3D creation). It would therefore make sense to explore how the Pencil could further become a ‘power-user’ tool, allowing creators to unlock new potentials. Yanko Design has imagined what these new nibs could look like, with explorations for more niche 2D uses. The interchangeable nibs include a fine-tip nib, a chisel nib, and a flexible brush-pen nib. Other nib styles could unlock 3D modeling features like being able to sculpt on the iPad.

While the current Apple Pencil has features like tilt recognition and pressure sensitivity, allowing it to function as any sort of drawing tool, the presence of a specialized nib helps seamlessly replicate the tactile experience of, say, drawing with a brush pen or a chisel marker. Moreover, the ability to replace nibs essentially increases the lifespan of the Pencil by allowing you to replace nibs when they wear down after constant use. “The filing suggests the nib could contain several different sensors for varying purposes. The component list includes tactile sensors, contact sensors, capacitive and touch sensors, a camera, a piezoelectric sensor, a pressure sensor, or a photodiode”, reports Apple Insider.

Designer/Visualizer: Sarang Sheth

Patent via: USPTO

This $70 S Pen/case combo won’t turn your S21 Ultra into a Galaxy Note

It seems more likely than ever that the Galaxy Note line as we know it is on its way out, and that's sure to be dire news for fans of the S Pen. Or will it? With the launch of this year's Galaxy S21 Ultra, Samsung is apparently trying to give its fan...

This pressure-sensitive stylus lets you draw on the Switch

When the Nintendo DS came with a stylus at launch, some developers used this feature to create drawing games for the portable console. One of those was Colors! which, according to developer Jens Andersson, accumulated over a million downloads since i...