This Samsung short-throw projector merges with Bixby to create a gadget that does it all!





Bixby has become a household name by now. Practically every home features a virtual assistant or smart device that takes care of things like dimming the lights or searching recipes for dinner. All it takes is the calling of its name for smart devices to jingle awake and assume their position for service. Inspired by features from Samsung’s virtual assistant Bixby, Osay Imarhiagbe has designed Samsung Smart Prism, a smart home accessory that combines a projector with a smart speaker.

The Samsung Smart Prism is coated in a refined matte black finish and maintains a discreet cubic shape that could fit inconspicuously on any tabletop. Compatible with Samsung Galaxy devices, the Smart Prism as designed by Imarhiagbe brings the device’s integrated information like images, audio, text beyond the physical limits of a standard smart home device. By combining a smart home speaker with an ultra-short-throw projector, the Smart Prism is capable of announcing requested information and projecting images like recipes in a queue and perhaps even previously downloaded films. Whenever the Smart Prism has a message to deliver to its user, the projector can launch it onto the wall so even if the audio message gets lost, a physical reminder remains.

While the Smart Prism was designed exclusively with Samsung Galaxy users in mind, the merging of an ultra-short-throw projector with all the perks of a standard virtual assistant is sure to give way to future developments in the smart home devices industry. Designed for portability, the Smart Prism has a compact build and integrated battery perfect for movie nights away from home or for bringing the projector from the living room to the kitchen for dinner with friends or family.

Designer: Osay Imarhiagbe

Coated with a matte-black finish, the Samsung Smart Prism is inconspicuous and adaptive by design.

With an integrated projector, the Samsung Smart Assistant is able to leave physical messages on the wall as reminders to users.

Compatible with Samsung Galaxy devices, The Samsung Smart Prism’s digital experience was designed exclusively for Samsung users.

Combining the perks of virtual assistant Bixby with the convenience of projected messages, the Smart Prism can take care of it all.

The Samsung Smart Prism is perfect for those nights spent cooking new recipes or watching movies with friends or family.

This sustainable office building uses passive energy practices and promotes biodiversity with their green roof!

CABI is an international nonprofit committed to solving problems related to agriculture and the environment through fact-based scientific expertise, improving the lives of people across the globe– those who work for CABI needed an office that reflected their mission. Taking on the project, Scott Brownrigg designed a sustainable headquarters based in the UK that features a rolling green roof and encourages biodiversity through highly energy-efficient building practices.

CABI’s new headquarters in Wallingford hones in on passive sustainability as its main focus. The building’s location and orientation were specifically chosen to minimize solar gains, allowing for shade in the warmer months and plenty of sunshine during the colder months. To achieve natural air ventilation, the building dons a perforated facade, allowing cool air to flow throughout the interior day and night, and then heat recovery ventilation pre-warms fresh air during the winter months. While this means for maintaining natural airflow is energy-efficient and passively sustainable, it also works to keep office workers comfortable in the age of COVID-19, allowing for fresh air to enter the building throughout the day. While all the energy-efficient practices take place inside the building, CABI headquarters’s exterior promotes biodiversity through a living roof, attracting insects and birds to its sprawling green hills.

Scott Brownrigg firm director Ed Hayden describes a sort of symbiotic relationship between the building and its occupants that was achieved through, “A traffic light system [which] alerts users when the building gets too hot or doesn’t have enough fresh air. It will prompt occupants to open their windows and increase the levels of fresh air in the building.” CABI has come a long way since its conception in 1910, hosting close to 180 members inside its new, sustainable headquarters.

Designer: Scott Brownrigg

From the outside, CABI’s new headquarters appear as two rolling hills.

CABI HQ is filled out with floor-to-ceiling windows that dissolve the barrier between the outside and inside, bringing its occupants even closer to the environment.

Inside, office workers enjoy natural air ventilation through the building’s perforated facades.

Scott Brownrigg designed CABI’s new headquarters to merge seamlessly with its surrounding environment.

Situated in the middle of a manicured lawn, CABI’s location was specifically chosen to minimize solar gains.

A perforated facade allows fresh air to flow into the building throughout the day.

A traffic light system was put in place to indicate when the office could use some fresh air, signaling workers to open their windows.

IKEA + Apple redesigned their AR app, improving user experience and playing with your interior styling!

Two things were certain during the pandemic– we all redesigned our homes and shopped online…a lot. While some of us took this time to peruse IKEA and design the home that we’ve been planning for years, the rest of us took a riskier approach and just bought what caught our eyes. To help mitigate the embarrassing effects of buying furniture without seeing how it fits in our room, IKEA in continued partnership with Apple has given their AR app, now called IKEA Studio, a complete overhaul.

Previously called the IKEA Place App, the augmented reality app allowed users to position furniture even outside of the bedroom – landing sofas and armoires in distant factory lots and busy city streets. Nowadays, retail brands across the interweb are implementing AR apps into their online shopping experience– from sunglasses to makeup companies, consumers are more aware than ever of what’s headed for their doorstep. While IKEA largely started the AR app trend four years ago, since more brands are catching on, the retail tech company turned to SPACE10 to transform IKEA Place App into IKEA Studio, a reenergized and sensor-oriented AR experience.

Still operating in beta, IKEA Studio relies on LiDAR sensors in the iPhone to register and analyze rooms, allowing iPhone users to completely redesign their living spaces. Relying on iPhone’s LiDAR sensors to capture physical spaces, IKEA Studio captures complete 3D plans of the user’s living space including the measurements and placement of every piece of furniture from the window sill to the loveseat. Replacing their current furniture with white boxes, users can furnish their virtual room with new IKEA pieces, redesign previous color schemes, and then generate the final rendering in either 3D or 2D to export and share with others. Similar to IKEA Place, IKEA Studio still does not have a shopping feature so users have to exit the AR app to purchase furniture online or just fill up their shopping carts with prospective purchases.

Those interested in following IKEA Studio to its final stages can sign up for beta testing and start the design process as soon as they get approved. While the AR app is currently limited to a mobile application exclusively built for the iPhone, designers at SPACE10 are also envisioning a future AR experience that replaces the mobile application with glasses that users can wear to envision and redecorate their home spaces as they see fit, literally.

Designers: IKEA, Apple, SPACE10

With help from the iPhone’s LiDAR sensors, IKEA Studio captures and registers every piece of furniture’s exact measurement and placement within the room.

Additional functions within the app include features that allow users to redesign previous color schemes of living spaces.

IKEA Studio works by replacing old furniture with blank white spaces that generate virtual space for newly chosen pieces of furniture.

This Mars-inspired multipurpose building defies conventional architecture to ignite our imagination!

Seoul-based architecture studio Moon Hoon is known for designing whimsical and geometric buildings that take on unexpected angled roofs and contrasting color schemes. When a client asked him to create a residence that defied all traditional architecture conventions, Moon Hoon turned to outer space for inspiration. Mars is a multipurpose structure located in Hwaseong, South Korea that comprises three geometric blocks stacked on top of one another, almost appearing like a honeycomb gone wonky.

Mars is situated in the new urban development of Hwaseong, where its surrounding environment is still relatively vacant and flat, evoking a similar landscape to that of the Big Red Planet. The three slabs were initially conceptualized as a long mobile home, but the plans ultimately matured to form three independent floors stacked together like a conjoined 3D puzzle. Mars wears a brass frame that borders modernist glass panels and Mondrian-esque steel beams.

Inside Mars, Moon Hoon aimed to provide an illusory spatial experience where the floors were folded and the roofs formed angles to test the resident’s sense of gravity. Stacked together, each of the three floor provides different functions, creating “a small and symbolic universe where spaceships and planets mingle haphazardly, evoking some kind of strange universe,” as Moon Hoon describes it.

The first floor, a rectangular and open-air space, is devoted to commercial use for anyone to rent out and design as they like. Right above the first geometric block, two apartment spaces fill out the second floor, one offering three bedrooms while the other comes as a one-bedroom living space. The top floor, occupied by the clients behind Mars’s conception, is the structure’s loft. There, its residents can enjoy total flexibility in a two-bedroom penthouse with an observatory-like sphere that juts out from one of Mars’s side facades, resembling a purposely misplaced, miniature Pantheon roof or Boulle’s Sphere, further enlightening the structure’s ode to planetary design. 

Designer: Moon Hoon

When looked at head-on, Mars resembles a honeycomb gone purposefully awry.

The side facade features a Pantheon-like sphere that houses the loft’s living room.

Inside, Moon Hoon designed Mars to mimic a “strange universe” fit for spaceships and planets alike.

The underside of the structure’s folded and angled floors form the roofs of the floors beneath, creating an illusory spatial experience.

Sliding wooden doors open each floor up to flexibility and open-air living spaces.

The top floor is occupied by the clients behind the structure’s conception, where two bedrooms and various living spaces converge.

The Pantheon-like sphere resembles an observatory and enhances the structure’s tribute to planetary design.

This flat-pack chair is supported by three rounded legs and requires no tools for assembly!

Developing unique, original ideas for chairs can be a tough ask– chairs have been around forever. Still, perhaps due to their rich, eclectic history, chairs supply an endless source of inspiration for designers. Adding his own interpretation to the mix, Yunjae Lee, a Seoul-based product designer has taken to birch plywood and CNC-milling to design and construct a chair with three rounded legs, requiring no additional tools or hardware for assembly.

Before assembly, Yunjae Lee’s Tri-Round Chair breaks down to eleven separate pieces– reminiscent of IKEA projects. From the looks of it, the eleven pieces of Tri-Round Chair have been CNC-milled to fit into one another like a 3D puzzle. The chair’s center support structure is comprised of two wooden pieces that rest on the ground, providing stability for the chair from the ground up. One longer beam intersects and runs perpendicular to those two boards to connect additional support side legs that cradle the chair’s main seat and backrest. The complex interlocking formation of the Tri-Round Chair ensures stability and a solid structure.

Tri-Round Chair is built from birch plywood that measures 18mm in width. By using thick pieces of plywood, Yunjae Lee was able to create a chair with rounded legs that can support the chair’s weight without any bending or the use of additional hardware. Through innovative, original design, each piece of Tri-Round Chair seamlessly connects with one another to form a finished product that feels familiar while giving the traditional four-legged chair new energy, and one less leg.

Designer: Yunjae Lee

By joining each separate component together, Tri-Round Chair finds support through a complex interlocking building method.

Symmetrical and round by design, Tri-Round Chair comprises eleven separate pieces of birch plywood.

Through interlocking and overlaid assembly, Tri-Round Chair is stable enough to carry weight.

Yunjae Lee painted Tri-Round Chair a darker shade of brown, a sophisticated new look compared to natural plywood.

Before assembly, Tri-Round Chair can be seen as eleven separate pieces, echoing what might appear as a project from IKEA.

This minivan-inspired cabin features a round roof and an open-air interior to allow increased interaction with the environment!

Imminent Studio and Grafito Design Studio have teamed up to create Dwelling Pod or D-Pod for short, a mono-volume residence inspired by the shape and form of a minivan and the functionality of modernism. While D-Pod hovers somewhere above the architectural category of ‘cabin,’ its design and aesthetic follow today’s trend of prefabricated ‘cabins in the woods.’

Constructed from concrete, glass, and metallic material, D-Pod is “based on the concept of lightness,” as Grafito Design Studio puts it, “where the separation of the ground is sought and lifted; its internal functional modules also use this concept of being ‘separated’ from the floor and ceiling.” In fact, D-Pod’s mono-volume nature makes it so that walls or dividers are unnecessary. Aiming to create an interior of spatial fluidity, the ‘rooms’ inside D-Pod flow into one another without the added impediment of walls or physical boundaries.

With transparent, floor-to-ceiling walls enclosing the entirety of D-Pod, the dwelling’s interior expands the visual space, dissolving D-Pod’s only walls into the environment that surrounds it. Conceptualized in the middle of a dense forest and mounted on top of a solid rock formation, D-Pod’s spatial fluidity, transparent walls, and air of modernism allow the structure to blend right into its surroundings.

Based on the form and shape of automobiles, D-Pod’s curved edges and mono-volume frame were inspired by the structure of minivans. While the rounded corners provide D-Pod with a distinguishable and appealing frame, its flat surfaces, roof, and floor fill D-Pod out with functionality and stability. Measuring 170m2, D-Pod currently stands as a concept, but everything from the pod’s inside to its outside has been planned for future developments.

Designers: Imminent Studio and Grafito Design Studio

With transparent, floor-to-ceiling walls, D-Pod blends right into its surroundings.

Glass panels can slide open and close to either entirely open up D-Pod to the outside or enclose it with transparent walls.

Inside, the lack of walls and dividers give D-Pod a mono-volume feel, similar to that found in a minivan.

With a wooden roof and transparent walls, D-pod is discreet in nature.

D-Pod is made of concrete, glass, and metal.

Come night, D-Pod shines like a lantern.

This personal security wearable uses voice recognition + pressure sensors to keep you safe in an emergency!

Mathilde Blondel, a student of France’s Université de Technologie de Compiègne created EVE, personal security and anti-aggression bracelet, after experiencing an assault on the streets of France. In collaboration with friend and colleague Romaric Delahaie, the duo followed EVE through a ten-month period to design the wearable personal security bracelet that’s encrypted with cutting-edge communication technology to provide efficient defense solutions in the face of street attacks.

Once activated, EVE launches a 10-second alarm meant to discourage the attacker from continuing their assault and instantly calls the local police station, sending operators the location and live audio recordings of the attack. EVE follows a two-step activation process to launch the wristband’s emergency features. First, to unlock EVE and prepare it for activation, the user simply shakes their wrist repeatedly three to five times. Embedded inside the wristband, an accelerometer and gyroscope detect the shaking and rotation of the wrist, awakening the device and gearing it up for activation. Then, either by announcing previously recorded voice triggers or by placing pressure on the wristband’s sensors, the 110dB alarm sounds, and the police are called, sending live recordings of the assault to an emergency operator, along with the GPS location of the EVE user.

Blondel and Delahaie designed EVE to be totally autonomous and independent from smartphones so that the functionality of EVE doesn’t depend on a smartphone’s proximity or battery levels. Over a ten-month long period, Blondel and Delahaie sketched and produced multiple prototypes to ultimately settle on a lightweight, small, and accessible wristband whose emergency triggers are easy to activate. Located in the palm of the hand, the sensors that activate emergency departments are easy to trigger and discreet by design.

Designers: Mathilde Blondel & Romaric Delahaie

Discreet by design, EVE is also easy to use and activate.

One charge of EVE can last up to a whole month.

Once activated, either through vocal recognition or sensor technology, EVE launches emergency help from local police officers.

EVE is encrypted with communication technology that functions to launch protective services in the face of street attacks.

The designers behind EVE ensured that the wristband was lightweight and small by design for a comfortable wear.

EVE can be activated by pressing the sensors located in the band that stretches across the palm of the user.

EVE can be activated either through voice triggers or pressure sensors.

Once the pressure sensors are activated, EVE sends out live audio recordings and GPS location to local police operators.

Wrist movement adaption allows EVE to band when the user chooses to unlock emergency services by shaking their wrist three to five times.

Following a ten-month long period of conceptualization and production, EVE ultimately assumed a lightweight body for accessible use.

EVE is equipped with smart technology for instant feedback.

Father of NASA’s design Program x Anicorn launched a NFT that offers an actual limited edition Space Watch!

In early April of 2020, NASA announced the comeback of their iconic red-worm logo, designed by Richard Danne, the ‘father of the NASA design program.’ The logo is recognized across the globe and came to be NASA’s official logo only a few years after Apollo 11 landed on the moon back in 1969. Today, NASA has teamed up with watchmaker Anicorn to release a NASA-branded NFT (non-fungible token) that can be used to redeem a physical “secret timepiece,” designed by Richard Danne.

NFTs originally were unique tokens that could be bought to certify digital artwork, but they’ve since turned into digital pieces of actual artwork. Essentially, NFTs convert digital artwork into unique, coded investments that can be traded on the blockchain. On Rarible, a digital marketplace for selling and buying NFT collectibles, Richard Danne’s NFT-backed digital artwork was sold for £30,000. The digital artwork showcases a vacuum-sealed, spinning object that’s shaped like a coin and coated with a reflective chrome finish, placed in front of a jet-black background.

Once purchased for £30,000, the NFT grants its buyer access to a limited edition, Danne-designed Space Watch. Unlike bitcoin, NFTs are unique and one-of-a-kind, so they work somewhat like certificates of authenticity. In a truly unique twist, this NFT acts like a redeemable token – a “Collector’s Gacha” if you will, which entitles the owner to the actual physical Space Watch (which makes this NFT one of the most interesting mergers of digital design going physical). The buyers will also receive a high-resolution video and sound clip that reveal the timepiece’s production blueprint along with audio of Richard Danne’s design statement.

While actual images of Space Watch still hover somewhere in the digital world of cryptocurrencies and NFTs, it has been described by NASA and Anicorn as donning a sapphire watch face finished with anti-reflective coating and engraved with the code SB 001/150 on the Space Watch’s case back. Smooth Miyota 9015 automatic movement keeps the watch running for over 42 hours, while deep-water resistance of 50-meters braces Space Watch and keeps it afloat. The watch face is then held together with a black leather strap, matte-black buckle, and stainless steel bracelet.

Designers: NASA x Anicorn x Richard Danne

The digital artwork for the NASA-branded NFT features a vacuum-sealed disc encased in chrome foil against a black background.

In collaboration with NASA and Anicorn, Richard Danne designed the first NASA-branded Space Watch.

This cat kennel doubles as a cat tower and storage area with enough room for two indoor litter boxes!





For the most part, cats know how to take care of themselves. The only thing they can’t do is buy cat litter and tin cans filled with wet salmon puree or chicken. All they need is a tiny home to call their own and they’ll be set. Luckily enough, designers at PaiPai Pets created a sort of tiny home for cats to play inside of and where their humans can stow away the litter box.

PaiPai Pets’ double basin cat kennel is a cat tower and console storage cabinet in one. Looking at the kennel head-on, two wide doors border a narrower middle door, which opens up to the kennel’s storage unit and jungle-gym interior. On the left and right sides of the kennel, there’s enough space to fit two large litter boxes, which are always accessible through the middle door’s open porthole.

Behind the kennel’s center cabinet, storage shelves can be found where cat owners can stow away smaller items like cans of wet cat food and litter scoopers. Painted in bright white, with natural wood accents along the perimeter, the kennel can remain discreet even in busier home spaces like the living room or den. Along the sides of the kennel, smaller portholes allow for plenty of airflow as well as a fun way for you to play whack-a-mole with your cat.

One of the main reasons people stay away from adopting kittens and cats is due to the smell of cat litter and the hassle that comes with taking care of that– if only cats could take care of their business and its smell too. PaiPai Pets’ double basin cat kennel provides a way for you and your cat to have your tuna and eat it too. With enough space to house two litter boxes and all the feline accessories you might need, PaiPai Pets takes care of the dirty business that we wish our cat could.

Designer: PaiPai Pets

PaiPai Pets’ double basin cat kennel has enough room to git two full-size litter boxes.

When closed, PaiPai Pets’ cat kennel is as nondescript as any other console storage unit.

The middle door opens up to a shelved compartment area for smaller accessories like litter scoopers and cans of food.

While the double basin cat kennel features areas for two litter boxes, there’s also room for a play area in the middle.

The side panels of PaiPai Pets’ cat kennel feature circular portholes that allow airflow and an additional play area for cats.

The winning design of Volvo’s New Garage Challenge features a green curved roof and integrated solar panels!

In honor of the debut of Volvo’s first pure-electric vehicle, the new XC40 Recharge, Volvo Cars Canada, and the Interior Design Show Toronto have chosen a winner for their New Garage Design Challenge. Canadian designers were told to rethink the function and design of the garage to then be judged based on criteria gathered by Maru/Blue. Reimagining the garage space as an interactive family space and biophilic greenway, Montreal designer Tiam Maeiyat’s Parking Parc was chosen as the winning concept for merging clean design with sustainability.

Parking Parc was inspired by the pun in its own name– Maeiyat reinterpreted the garage as both a space for parking the vehicle and as an actual greenway that resembles a children’s park. Shaped like a rolling hillside, Parking Parc provides a storage area for parked vehicles that rests beneath the garage’s grassy, recreational exterior. As currently conceptualized, photovoltaic panels punctuate the taller regions of the garage’s exterior, providing clean energy for Volvo’s XC40 Recharge to well, recharge, and enough energy to sustain the rest of the garage’s inside operations. Describing the design in his own words, Maeiyat notes,

“The garage may be the last place in a house one might consider for gathering or entertainment, which is exactly why my design celebrates light and transparency and links the inside and outside of the garage. By doing so, there are new possibilities around quality family time, regardless of time or season.”

While the functionality of garages cannot be argued, they’ve largely stayed the same in design and structure while the vehicles that remain parked inside of them have changed drastically over the years. The New Garage Design Challenge aimed to introduce a new way of looking at garages that fits the contemporary and energy-efficient nature of today’s vehicles. Tiam Maeiyat’s reinterpretation of the traditional garage turns to biophilic design and green roofing to help maintain the home’s natural landscape and grassy surroundings.

Designer: Tiam Maeiyat

Inspired by the rounded edges of Volvo’s XC40 Recharge, Parking Parc’s shapes into a rolling hillside.

Parking Parc’s green roof collects rainwater, purifies the air, reduces the ambient temperature, and saves energy.

“My design upcycles the garage space into a new form of the family room,” notes Tiam Maeiyat.

 

Flexible solar panels line the top of Parking Parc, providing the garage’s inhabitants with energy.