This Origami-inspired lamp folds flat into a sheet while carrying, and opens into a nifty tabletop lamp when you need





Working almost like an iPad cover/stand would, the ORY lamp is a nifty little flat-packed number that you can slide right into your backpack and carry wherever you need. Upon arriving at a dark setting that requires tabletop illumination, the sheet cleverly folds into a two-way tabletop lamp that shines light downwards and forwards, letting you easily light up a space for work, reading, dining, etc.

The nifty little Ory lamp (named for its origami abilities) assumes the shape of a flat sheet of faux leather, making it ridiculously easy to slide into backpacks, briefcases, or folders. It uses two powerful COB (Chip on Board) LEDs that sit flat within the lamp’s design, and comes with crease-lines that allow the flat leatherette sheet to transform into a tubular structure with two offshoots (sort of like two banana peels) that sport the LED strips facing downward. Switch the lamp on and the LEDs cast a bright direct light onto a tabletop surface. Flaps on the sides of the LEDs act as lamp-shades, preventing the direct glare from the LEDs from hitting your eye, while focusing the light downwards towards an otherwise dark tabletop surface.

Designer: Il-Seop Yoon

As interesting as the lamp may look visually, its internals are just as awe-inspiring. The lamp’s folding/flexing design still manages to cleverly integrate all the necessary electronics in, while still remaining deceptively flat. The lamp runs on a mobile phone Li-ion battery, giving it a slim construction, and even sports a wireless Qi-charging coil on the side, allowing you to fold the lamp up and place it on a wireless charger to juice up its battery. The absence of a traditional charging port, according to designer Il-Seop Yoon, allows the Ory lamp to be water-resistant too, so a couple of drops of rain (or a knocked-over cup of coffee) won’t do anything to the lamp.

Metal plates inside the lamp’s design give it structure while also providing the creasing necessary for the lamp to flip and fold. Moreover, I wouldn’t be surprised if they acted as a heat sink too, dissipating any of the thermal energy generated by the LEDs.

There aren’t too many technical details (or pricing) on the Ory, given that it’s currently just a proof of concept. Although, I’d really like to see the lamp hit production soon!

This Transforming Robotic Furniture Going From Bed To living room setup Is The 2021 Investment We Need!





This past year has seen some pretty innovative work from home office solutions. But working from home is not all about work! In fact, the majority of our time oscillates between procrastination and clearing up home space to resemble that Instagram influencer’s tidy organized home setup. Fluffing cushions, folding throws, and making the bed is the first step that, if skipped, causes a residual tension you feel every time you walk past that untidy space and one thing’s for sure, you don’t need that!

Meet Ori’s latest bed that drops any time you want to drop! We love furniture design that saves space because space/building efficiency is key to climate change. Ori, an MIT-based startup has been a key factor in helping us look at designs a new way, Ori’s Cloud Bed, Sofa edition is giving us our Instagram goals, without the folding up you don’t want to do! Accurately called Cloud Bed because it drops from the ‘skies’ when you wish to sleep, this innovative piece can be a game-changer for tiny homes, urban apartments, and more. Logic dictates that for any person, only one product will be in use at a time – either their bed or the couch. Keeping this in mind, Ori’s bed hides in the ceiling when not in use during the day and reveals a complete living room setup underneath it – a couch as well as a matching coffee table. No more making the bed needed!

Brooklyn-based brand, Ori, adds this ceiling bed to complete its range of expandable closets and offices which are all created around the notion of minimizing space while maximizing functionality and never compromising on the aesthetics! Taking inspiration from the Japanese art of Origami, Ori is the need of the hour and finally gives you an easy way to Netflix, chill, and sleep without cramping on your tiny couch!

Designer: Ori

Click Here to Buy Now!

Origami-inspired product designs that promise to add a sense of Ikigai to your life!

There’s something so soothing and therapeutic about the Japanese art of Origami. Some may say it’s simply folding paper, but it is much more than that. Though I may not be very good at it, almost everything made using this technique is always super pretty and you feel like secretly storing it away from clumsy hands. Origami has been a major source of inspiration for designers. They’ve been integrating this technique into many of their designs, and the result is minimal, artistic, and beautiful products that instantly make you feel at ease. We’ve curated a collection of origami-inspired designs – from a minimal tea table that was inspired by it to a shoe grip inspired by Kirigami (a variation of Origami). Each of these designs will invoke a sense of peace and serenity within you, and you would love to add them to your daily life and living space!

Hasu transforms itself as the tea ritual progresses making it a contemporary piece of furniture that still pays a tribute to the process. It starts as a minimal compact structure and ends as a complete furniture set for tea time. Hasu’s design allows storing an extensive tea collection while presenting it in a unique and clean manner – it is almost like you can fold or unfold the tea time ritual like origami. There is a lot of storage for all the objects needed for tea rituals and the table allows you to present them one by one during tea time, it is all on-site so everything is handy as well as neatly tucked away. The unfolding of the four upper tabletops marks the beginning of the tea time ritual. Extend the seating to four guests by simply pulling the floor chairs from the table. Even when it is not in use, it still upgrades the space as an abstract piece.

The Origami Bottle may have a solution to that convenient problem. Designed to be reusable, but more importantly, be collapsible, the Origami Bottle folds down to 20% of its original size when not in use. Small enough to easily fit into any bag without occupying much space, the Origami Bottle neatly folds down to a nice, portable puck that’s easy and convenient to carry around. When you need to fill it up, the bottle opens up to a full size of 25oz (750ml). Made from a food-safe non-toxic TPE, the Origami bottle is characterized by its network of creases that cover the bottle’s sides. These creases act as fold lines, allowing the bottle to collapse and expand whenever you want it, but here’s where the Origami bottle’s design shines through.

With the Imagiro, the carpet isn’t just a carpet anymore, but instead is an imagination-fueled origami art-installation that decorates your home (or even a hotel/retail space) in all three dimensions, displayed as a part of the Wayon showcase by EINA University of Design, Barcelona.

The Clixo magnetic building set presents the most dramatic change to this classic idea, by disregarding the need for block-shaped pieces entirely. Instead of sticking to the tried-and-true design of geometric shapes, the Clixo pieces are thin and flexible, almost like a sheet of origami paper. Some of the pieces mimic the shape of a fidget spinner, with four leg-like structures with circular, magnetic connectors. What are the advantages of this design? Firstly, it allows a Clixo to do what a lego can’t: fold inward and attach to its own legs. Secondly, it allows you to build anywhere (literally). Conventional building blocks must be stacked on a flat surface, otherwise, they’ll topple over. Clixo pieces aren’t limited by that constraint. You can build a new creation on your lap, wrap them around your wrist like a bracelet, or even stick them on your fridge like magnets.

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The FODI is a nifty little stand for your tablet and smartphone. When flat, it measures a cool 1mm thick and uses the powers of Origami to fold open into a convenient stand that lets you dock your smartphone or tablet onto it at a convenient angle for watching videos, movies, or just regular video-chatting. The FODI is made from polymers that provide strength over periodic use (the PP gives it its flexible ability). Designed with alluring patterns like marble, granite, wood, or even graphical designs, the FODI goes rather well with the tech that docks on it as well as the decor around you. Its incredibly slim profile even means you can carry it around with you in your tablet-sleeve or backpack. If only it could wirelessly charge your devices too, that would just be perfect!

Inspired by the techniques used for origami, this compact and portable headphone is designed to fit into just about any space. Being a practical device, it is waterproof, dust-proof, and durable. Designer Vedang Kulkarni has kept in mind the key aspects of functionality and transformation. Needless to say, all controls are intuitively placed, so that you can access and adjust them easily. Audiball is your personal headphone and a smart speaker on the go. The telescopic headband is stylish and looks very chic as an accent in the speaker mode. Features include active noise-canceling technology for a better listening experience.

A century ago, not a soul would have imagined the advances in medical science we have achieved. Taking the evolution of medical surgeries a step further, MIT engineers have crafted an origami-inspired medical patch that can wrap around your internal organs with the utmost ease. This design makes it pretty useful in application to internal injuries or sensitive parts of the internal organs – airways, intestines, or hard-to-reach spaces. Aesthetically speaking, the design appears just like a foldable piece of paper; this patch contacts the tissues and organs. After that, it morphs into a thick gel that stays firmly on the injured area until it heals. The patch is made up of three layers – the top layer is an elastomer film consisting of zwitterionic polymers that become a water-based skin-like barrier. The middle layer is the bio-adhesive hydrogel having the compound NHS esters to form a strong bond with the tissue surface. The bottom layer is made up of silicone oil to prevent it from sticking to the body surface before reaching the intended target.

The University of Cambridge and The University of Queensland teamed up to create ‘The HappyShield’. The HappyShield is an origami face shield, that is created by simply folding a piece of clear plastic. The shield basically comprises a clear sheet and some elastic. Employing the curve-crease origami technique, the translucent plastic is folded on a template, and merged with a piece of elastic to create The HappyShield! The shield is very easy to make, and not does require 3D printing or any other complicated techniques. It can simply be made by hand and manufactured in bulk!

MIT engineers introduced a shoe grip, that was inspired by Kirigami – a variation of origami! It’s quite similar to snakeskin and is a sturdy friction-boosting material that will provide you with a stronger grip, especially when walking across a slippery surface. The super grip was designed bearing in mind older adults, as they are more prone to slipping, and it could reduce the risk of falling even! The Kirigami technique used here has been gaining a lot of popularity recently. It was even used to create a bandage that can artfully stick onto the tricky and deformable areas of your body. Origami has a lot more uses than we know, it seems!

The Bookniture Origami Furniture by MoMA is really as creative as a product can get! It’s a piece of furniture that folds into a book when not in use! When folded, Bookniture is basically a book, one that you can easily slide onto your bookshelf or your desk. When opened, it forms an accordion-style furniture design that can be used as a table, seat, or even a storage shelf. Despite the fact that it can be folded in origami-style, the design is quite durable and able to hold quite a bit of weight. So you can sit on it with ease, without fearing that it’ll break apart and you may fall!

Japanese tea rituals inspired this flexible, modular, origami-like wooden table!

Tea time is significant in many Asian cultures, it is a moment of pause in the day where one can enjoy a peaceful moment of solitude or socialize and relax with friends. Tea time is a beautiful ritual in Japanese culture and Hasu is a tea table inspired by that zen practice. Hasu transforms itself as the tea ritual progresses making it a contemporary piece of furniture that still pays a tribute to the process.

It starts as a minimal compact structure and ends as a complete furniture set for tea time. Hasu’s design allows storing an extensive tea collection while presenting it in a unique and clean manner – it is almost like you can fold or unfold the tea time ritual like origami. There is a lot of storage for all the objects needed for tea rituals and the table allows you to present them one by one during tea time, it is all on-site so everything is handy as well as neatly tucked away. The unfolding of the four upper tabletops marks the beginning of the tea time ritual. Extend the seating to four guests by simply pulling the floor chairs from the table. Even when it is not in use, it still upgrades the space as an abstract piece.

Hasu is produced using several construction techniques (traditional + modern) and different types of wood joineries. The body is crafted from solid oak and features powder-coated aluminum details. It includes a brand new hinge system that was specifically designed for Hasu. The simple yet innovative design gives tea lovers a chance to elevate their rituals without adding clutter. It allows you to disconnect from the surroundings and cherish peaceful moments with loved ones while enjoying the warmth of the teacup in your palms.

“Just like an opening lotus flower, when the first rays of sun caress the horizon during sunrise, symbolizes the start of a new day,” says Mortelmans while perfectly describing the soul of Hasu.

Designer: Dieter Mortelmans

This award-winning to-go coffee cup comes with its own integrated origami lid!

The LIDfree is less of a redesign and more of a re-imagination of lids themselves. A sustainable improvement on plastic lids would probably be to design lids that are made out of paper instead… but to redesign a cup in a way that it doesn’t need a lid? That’s truly something worth marveling. Meet the LIDfree, a to-go paper cup that comes with its own fold-in lid. While the lid isn’t 100% spill-proof (not even the plastic ones are), it does a few key things really well.

A. Preventing spillage.
B. Merging of two products (cup and lid) into one.
C. Giving you a central channel to put your straw (and even giving you the option to not use one)
and finally, D. replacing a wasteful plastic part with a recyclable paper one.

The LIDfree cup features a nifty folding rim that collapses inwards to shut the cup. While it leaves a central hole open, the design still, for the most part, remains spill-proof as the hole remains at an elevated position when the cup is lying on its side. Moreover, the central hole is perfect for inserting straws of any width (hopefully eco-friendly ones!) as the origami elements expand and contract to the diameter of the straw. Drinking from the cup is as simple as opening the rim outwards to turn it into a regular cup, and when opened, the LIDfree cup remains stackable, ensuring that the design satisfies all needs, from that of the barista to the consumer, to finally the environment!

The LIDfree Cup is a winner of the Golden Pin Design Award for the year 2020.

Designers: Chia-Chun Chuang & Pei-Chun Hsueh

Flexible Origami-inspired bottle folds down to a compact, pocketable size!

There’s a certain, undeniable convenience to the plastic bottle. It’s easy to just take off the shelf, drink from, and then throw away once you’re done. You don’t need to worry about carrying a bulky bottle along with you that occupies the same amount of space, even when empty. The convenience of plastic is addictive, but it comes at a price. There’s a garbage island the size of Texas floating around in the pacific sea, COVERED with plastic bottles we used and threw away without batting an eyelid. Plastic bottles are preferred because they’re more convenient than carrying your own bulky empty bottles around with you, but the Origami Bottle may have a solution to that convenient problem.

Designed to be reusable, but more importantly, be collapsible, the Origami Bottle folds down to 20% of its original size when not in use. Small enough to easily fit into any bag without occupying much space, the Origami Bottle neatly folds down to a nice, portable puck that’s easy and convenient to carry around. When you need to fill it up, the bottle opens up to a full size of 25oz (750ml).

Made from a food-safe non-toxic TPE, the Origami bottle is characterized by its network of creases that cover the bottle’s sides. These creases act as fold lines, allowing the bottle to collapse and expand whenever you want it, but here’s where the Origami bottle’s design shines through. When entirely expanded, the bottle remains rigid and upright, thanks to the Origami bottle’s curved walls which become robust when the bottle’s opened out. When you need to fold the bottle down, just unscrew the cap and push against the horizontal crease lines and the bottle goes back to its small, portable form factor.

The bottle comes with a spill-proof leakproof cap along with an integrated carry-ring that lets you suspend it from your backpacks. Perfect for hot beverages as well as cold drinks, the Origami bottle can be used as a regular bottle during your day-to-day outings as well as while traveling outdoors. Aside from helping take plastic bottles out of circulation, the Origami is made from a proprietary material called Arnitel Eco, allowing it to be “closed-loop recyclable”, which means the bottle’s materials can be 100% recycled to the same quality. Pretty neat, eh? Did I also mention they come in a bunch of colors, and since they’re collapsible they’re also ridiculously easy to clean??

Designer: DiFOLD

This beautiful accordion-inspired ambient light transforms into whatever shape you want!

You’ve heard about fidget toys, but have you ever heard about fidget lighting? The Accordion Lamp from Gingko is the perfect example of a lighting design that doesn’t just illuminate… it interacts too! The folding/foldable lamp comes a pleated Tyvek-paper shade sitting between two pieces of wood. The lamp’s lights illuminate through the pleated paper, while the Tyvek’s folded nature allows you to maneuver the lamp like a slinky, adjusting it in a variety of shapes and forms.

The lamp’s LED lighting and battery come built right into its wooden ends, and hidden magnets allow the ends to snap to each other, creating interesting-looking closed forms, or even allowing you to hook up multiple Accordion Lamps to create one singular, fun, flexible strip of lighting! The portable lamp comes with two light color-temperatures, allowing you to switch between warm and cool lighting just by shutting and opening the lamp, and provides 7-10 hours of lighting (and playing) on a full battery charge!

Designer: Gingko Design

Click Here to Buy Now

Designer: Gingko Design

How to Make an Origami Globe

If someone asked me to make an origami swan, I’d have a hard time doing it, so I can’t imagine being able to construct a complete globe of the Earth by folding paper. But those with more patience and papercrafting skills than I should check out this tutorial that was recently posted on Instructables.

Paper artist shared detailed instructions on how he created this vibrant globe using colored paper and lots and lots of folding.

The trick to building the paper globe is that it’s made up using little triangular units, each of which interlocks to form a piece of the finished model. He started out by printing a map projection that accounted for the curvature of the earth, then mapped out which paper colors would correspond to each continent. Once he had his plan, he had to individually fold over 1,400 pieces of paper, and assembled the globe one slice at a time, starting from the equator out.

The tutorial includes a listing of exactly how many triangles are needed for each slice, though I imagine you could simply multiply these counts if you wanted to build a bigger version – with some extra rows added to keep it round and not too blocky.  The main sphere is held together without glue, though the base structure benefits from some hot glue, and yes the globe actually spins, thanks to a pencil running through its center.

The Instructables tutorial makes it all sound simpler than it looks, especially since Jorik did all of the hard work planning things out. Still, you’re gonna need a lot of time and patience if you decide to build one of these for yourself,